Questions tagged [terminology]

For questions about technical or specialized words in fields like grammar, IT, politics, sports, etc.

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1answer
138 views

Grammatical terminology

Do you know the book that describes the origin of grammatical terms, gives their definition, explains why they are called the way they are etc. (e. g. what is "conjugation", why do we call ...
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2answers
156 views

What does causa procurans mean?

What is the definition of the expression causa procurans, and who may have been the originator of the term? I found this expression used by a number of people, but I haven't been able to find it ...
3
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1answer
47 views

Create new word: super + portare

I want to create a new word by analogy to "support" with the prefix super-. According to Google the modern English word "support" comes from Latin supportare and is composed of sub-...
5
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1answer
220 views

Changing tones (?) in Classical Latin

When I heard Classical Latin for the first time on Horatii carmina quae voce canora Thomas Nudipes pronuntiat, I was surprised to hear what I will describe as changing tones! The reason why I was ...
5
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1answer
103 views

Is there a Latin equivalent to ἐπίκοινος?

The Ancient Greek grammatical tradition, going back to Dionysius Thrax (or maybe farther), distinguishes five types of nouns: masculine, feminine, neuter, common, and epicene (ἐπίκοινος). Four of ...
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6answers
9k views

What should the corona virus be called in Latin?

The corona virus (or a specific kind thereof) is a hot topic, and one should of course be able to discuss it in Latin. But what should we call the thing in Latin? Both corona and virus are Latin words,...
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3answers
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Does ancient Greek have its own terms for grammar?

I'm working on ancient Greek (Homeric) vocabulary, and sometimes it's helpful to write down, e.g., on a flashcard, some grammatical information. For example I might want to record that ἕν is neuter (...
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2answers
228 views

Why was the subjunctive mood 'so called because the Greek subjunctive mood is used almost exclusively in subordinate clauses'?

Concerning the adjective "subjunctive", OED (3rd ed., 2012) mentions (emphasis mine): Post-classical Latin subiunctivus is a translation equivalent of Hellenistic Greek ὑποτακτικός , which as a ...
5
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2answers
337 views

What is the term for extremely loose Latin word order?

For a Latin-language artificial intelligence called Mensa Latina the user manual will need to discuss and therefore refer to the phenomenon in Latin prose where meaning comes from grammar and ...
10
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1answer
899 views

Exactly what is a declension?

I was reading a Latin grammar book (Jenney's First Year Latin, for the curious) having recently resolved to learn a bit about the language and what I understood was as follows: Latin is an inflected ...
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2answers
97 views

in order of temporal proximity

In Latin, how would you refer to the concept of sorting events according to temporal proximity (i.e. most recent, or nearest to now, first); as opposed to sorting by priority, or starting from the ...
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5answers
401 views

What is the "economy principle" in papyrology exactly?

I have come across the phrase "economy principle" somewhere I cannot recall, talking about why some combinations of papyrus fragments were made. What is this principle exactly? Update As I typed it, ...
5
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1answer
517 views

How to translate machine learning?

Machine learning is a roughly method where a machine learns to perform a certain task by learning on its own. The machine gains experience and can solve a very specific problem intuitively. It is not ...
5
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1answer
205 views

Why did the Romans link Autumn with earth and melancholy, Spring with air and sanguine, and Winter with water and phelgm?

I don't understand the Romans' linking of humor, season, and characteristics for Humours 1-3. E.g. for 1: 1.1. Why'd black bile predominate in autumn (which I agree, is cold and dry)? 1.2. Why'd ...
5
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1answer
117 views

What does 'iure civili' mean in Apuleius VI.23, when Cupid and Psyche get married?

When Cupid and Psyche get married, at the end of their story in Apuleius' Metamorphoses VI.23, Jupiter announces that they will be wed iure civili: Et ad Venerem collata facie, ‘Nec tu,’ inquit ‘...
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1answer
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What is the difference between a roman ("novel") and a "Milesiae fabula"?

Apparently, the fabula Milesiae, "story of Miletus", was a Greek genre. Apuleius calls himself "the author of this Milesian tale" in his Metamorphoses (IV.32, below). From what I remember of the (late)...
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1answer
65 views

General term for each inflected form of a lexeme

illī is a X of ille declension. illī is singular dative masculine form of ille. In the first sentence what we should say instead of X?
6
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1answer
326 views

Meaning of Spiritus Lenis

I'm studying Arabic grammar from an old text book and it uses the term Spiritus Lenis. What does it mean? To quote the book: The object of it is merely to distinguish elif as the long vowel (ie ...
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1answer
544 views

What exactly is brevis brevians?

I have come across the term brevis brevians a couple of times on this site. Unfortunately Google does not provide me with a clear definition with examples, so I am still not entire sure what it means. ...
4
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1answer
143 views

Is there a rhetorical term for personification?

In the ancient inventory of technical terms for rhetorical effects and devices, was there a term corresponding specifically to personification, in the sense of "the attribution of a personal nature or ...
5
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1answer
181 views

Caeteris paribus

Caeteris paribus means "all else being equal" yet, terminologically, also stands in for "all else unchanged". I'm interested in knowing actually how to say "all else unchanged" in a way that bears ...
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2answers
548 views

Why do we call a case a casus? And why rectus, obliquus?

I would translate the grammatical word casus (whence English case) as "a fall". And, indeed, the German word is Fall, Dutch naamval ("name fall"). Why is this word used for the grammatical function of ...
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1answer
161 views

Please briefly define "futurum instans"

I am writing a book, quoting from Aune: “There are several instances in Revelation of this use of ἔρχεται as futurum instans…” Note that Aune uses the term “futurum instans” for Greek, not ...
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0answers
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What is meant exactly by the "familiae Troianae"?

I have seen the term familiae Troianae mentioned in Pauly and elsewhere. It has something to do with Roman families and Trojan ancestry, but it seems to be a fixed and well known term: what does it ...
12
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1answer
268 views

Did the Romans have a Latin name for their domestic peristylia?

A typical upper- and probably also middle-class Roman house in the classical age contained a peristylium or peristylum, or so I was told. I wonder why they used a Greek word for such a standard Roman ...
9
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1answer
161 views

How does the gerund 'bear' or 'carry'?

[ Etymonline: ] 1510s, from Latin gerundum "to be carried out," gerundive of gerere "to bear, carry" (see gest). In Latin, a verbal noun used for all cases of the infinitive but the nominative; ...
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696 views

What's the difference between coniunctivus and subiunctivus?

I was thrown off by a recent question that talked about the "conjunctive" mood, which I had never heard of. A few searches of William Whitaker's Words reveals that both coniunctivus (or conjunctivus) ...