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Questions tagged [stress]

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How do we know how -iī and -iit perfects were stressed?

The question Are there exceptions to the Latin stress rules? has an answer by Joel Derfner saying that the first-person singular perfect forms dormiī, audiī, veniī (for dormīvī, audīvī, venīvī) have ...
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How were Greek patronymics stressed in Latin?

According to Wikipedia, the Scipios (as in Africanus) were known collectively as the Scīpiadae rather than the Scīpionēs. This was a rather poetic Greek way to say "sons of Scipio", as in the Atreïdae ...
4
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2answers
107 views

When did the penult stress rule disappear?

Classical Latin stress was famously based on the "penult rule": stress goes on the penult if heavy, the antepenult otherwise. In later Latin, vowel length seems to have been lost very early: before ...
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1answer
104 views

Were enclitics considered part of a word for stress purposes?

One rule of Latin stress is that it can never go farther back than the antepenult: the third syllable from the end. For example, we have cár-men "song", cár-mi-ne "with a song", and car-mí-ni-bus "...
15
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1answer
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Dating the penult rule

When did initial-syllable stress give way to the penult rule? W.S. Allen suggests that the former persisted "until around Plautus's time", and provides metrical evidence from Plautus and Terence that ...
3
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3answers
137 views

Did Classical Latin stress impact any sound changes?

It's fairly well-known that Old Latin had initial stress, which is why vowels generally only get reduced in non-initial syllables: see aptus versus in-eptus, which is continued by English "apt" and "...
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0answers
106 views

Is there a difference between prose stress and metric stress?

According to an earlier question, we do not know how stress was realized on classical Latin. It may have been dynamic (stressed syllables are louder), tonal (stress changes pitch), or a combination, ...
7
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2answers
122 views

Accents in compound words and words with enclitics

I've been learning Latin on my own for the last 4 months or so using Wheelock and Moreland & Fleischer. I've not been able to find answers to the following accentuation questions in either of ...
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1answer
116 views

How is stress realized in Latin phonetically?

I have heard that Latin does not lengthen stressed syllables. If so, are they pronounced louder or with altered articulation, maybe a higher pitch?
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4answers
769 views

Why do some Latin adverbs have accent on the last syllable?

In the opening chapter of De Musica (written 387-391), St. Augustine gives an example of a Latin oxytone, i.e. a word with accentual stress on the ultimate syllable: MASTER: Now when we pronounce ...
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0answers
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Pronunciation when adding -que [duplicate]

Wheelock's Latin says: In a word of two syllables the accent always falls on the first syllable: sér-vō, sáe-pe, ní-hil. In a word of three or more syllables, the accent falls on the next to ...
8
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1answer
82 views

Stressed syllables in certain prefixed verb forms

I've managed to confuse myself about which syllables to stress in prefixed verbs of two syllables, the first one being short (e.g. circumdare or alloquor). Do I stress the penultimate syllable in each ...
3
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1answer
105 views

How do we know where the Roman prose stress was?

I have been taught that the stress in classical Latin is on the second last syllable if it is long and on the third last syllable otherwise. In two-syllable words the stress is on the first syllable. ...
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0answers
177 views

Etymology and pronunciation of words ending in “-iasis”

Unfortunately, I don’t own any Latin or Greek dictionaries or etymological texts, but I tried to research this topic on the internet. Here is what I found: Perseus: words ending in “iasis” in L&S ...
7
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1answer
118 views

How to place a second stress on a long word

In terms of stress, what should I do with a long segment anterior to the stressed syllable of a long word? An example would be: comperiēbātur --where I have emboldened the stressed syllable as I ...
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0answers
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Rules of syllabification [duplicate]

In Latin Grammar, Robert J. Henle wrote (p. 2), Accent. a. In words of two syllables the accent is on the first. vía; béllum b. In words of more than two syllables, if the second last ...
3
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2answers
153 views

Gemination after stressed vowel

Sometimes I hear people geminate consonants after stressed vowels in speech. For example, amāta might be pronounced as amātta. I have not heard enough to tell if this gemination is ...
3
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1answer
104 views

Moving the stress in sung Latin

Is there a convention for moving the stress out of its spoken position when singing Latin? Or should the singer endeavor to keep the stress where it would occur in speech even when the melody seems to ...
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3answers
1k views

Are there exceptions to the Latin stress rules?

Do the Latin stress rules (antepenultimate if penultimate is light, penultimate if heavy) have any known exceptions? If so, what are the exceptions, and what evidence is there in the grammatical ...