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Was Greek ever written in this way at any time in antiquity?

Are there any extant ancient Greek inscriptions that exhibit all of the following features: scriptio continua (i.e., majuscules letters only, no spaces between words, no diacritics, no punctuation ...
Noah J's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
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Patristic philology - editions of byzantine texts

We are aware of the editions of classical texts (ancient Greek and Latin) by Oxford, Teubner, Bude, Loeb. Where should I search for byzantine texts and especially works of Greek Orthodox Holy Fathers (...
SK_'s user avatar
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English pronunciation of Ancient Greek names

Are there any rules for converting Ancient Greek names into an English (borrowed) pronunciation? I'm imagining an algorithm of Ancient Greek letters → English IPA that would work in 90% or 80% of ...
Simon Branch's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
346 views

Is there any potential ambiguity in this phrase from Xenophon?

I'm (still) reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I came across this sentence: οἱ μὲν οὖν πρῶτοι ὅμως τρόπῳ τινὶ ἐστρατοπεδεύσαντο, οἱ δὲ ὕστεροι σκοταῖοι προσιόντες ὡς ἐτύγχανον ἕκαστοι ηὐλίζοντο, καὶ ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
623 views

One Syllabus Many Syllabontes?

Trask's Historical Linguistics (3rd Edition) makes an off-hand comment that "the Greek word syllabus has a Greek plural syllabontes". As we know syllabus is actually a spurious word, arising ...
Tristan's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
77 views

What is this grammar and how should I interpret this?

εἰσὶν δὲ οὗτοι οἱ οὐδὲν ἄλλο οἰόμενοι εἶναι ἢ οὗ ἂν δύνωνται ἀπρὶξ τοῖν χεροῖν λαβέσθαι, πράξεις δὲ καὶ γενέσεις καὶ πᾶν τὸ ἀόρατον οὐκ ἀποδεχόμενοι ὡς ἐν οὐσίας μέρει. I don't understand the bold ...
user21669's user avatar
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Ancient Greek sophós, Meaning of [closed]

I am not asking for what is available in any dictionary. I am not asking what is the oldest meaning. Or how it developed later. Or any theories whatsoever. What I am asking is this and ONLY this: ...
Attila the Pun's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

What are the differences between the words "QUASI", "HYPER", and "PSEUDO"?

As an opening our question, briefly consider the following three examples of mathematical terminology: Quasi-Sphere Hyper-Sphere Pseudo-Sphere What are the differences between the words "QUASI&...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
121 views

Have these Greek letters been related to these Latin/English letters?

Was each following Latin/English letter originated from, cognate with, or related to the Greek letter given after the Latin/English letter? Latin f and Greek phi Latin h or e, and Greek eta Latin j ...
Tim's user avatar
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How do I say " One more" in Ancient Greek?

How would I say "one more" (as in, "one more beer") in Ancient Greek. My friends and I have an inside joke of always saying "one more" whenever someone wants to leave a ...
Vuk's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
89 views

How shall I remember the order between the letters in Greek alphabet?

In Greek alphabet, letters are ordered from alpha to omega. Why is it the order? How was it originated? Does the order matter? I saw that the order is used in Greek numerals for naming numbers. What ...
Tim's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
73 views

Differences between φρονεω and νοεω

What is the difference between the meaning of these two words? How is it different when I φρονεω vs when I νοεω? So far as I understand it, νοεω is from the νους or καρδια, and φρονεω is from the φρην....
Phillip's user avatar
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2 answers
2k views

What are the Greek or Latin words for these SI prefixes?

Smith's Greek and Latin Roots gives the etymology of a few SI prefixes. For example, tera- is from Greek teras ("monster"), deci- from Latin decem, and micro- from Greek mikros ("small&...
Tim's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
140 views

Is μάλα (mala, adv.) derived or cognate with some adjective?

In Attic Greek, μάλα is an adverb meaning "very, very much, exceedingly." Is it derived from some adjective, or is there an adjective that is its cognate? Is μακρός (makros) the adjective? ...
Tim's user avatar
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0 answers
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Are monos and eis synonyms?

In Attic Greek, monos means only, alone, and eis means one. Are they synonyms? Can monos also mean one?
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
66 views

If the city name Napoli comes from Ancient Greek "Nea Polis" (new town), why isn't it called "Gnapoli" instead?

If the city name Napoli comes from Ancient Greek "Nea Polis" (new town), why isn't it called "Gnapoli" instead? Why wasn't the 'n' at the beginning yotated by the following 'e'?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
79 views

Does ὅδε (hode) refer to what follows or what precedes?

Learn to Read Greek by Keller says on p100: οὕτος [houtos] and ὅδε [hode] are both translated “this” in the singular and “these” in the plural. ὅδε [hode] however points more emphatically to people ...
Tim's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
461 views

What does enclitic mean here?

What does enclitic mean in Learn to Read Greek, by Keller? In Attic Greek the word tis, ti may function either as an indefinite pronoun or as an indefinite adjective. Its forms are identical with ...
Tim's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
88 views

How to find the transliteration of a (Attic) Greek word?

Is there a way to find the transliteration of a (Attic) Greek word in English/Latin? Also called Romanization of a Greek word, I guess? Is there a dictionary that provides the transliteration of each ...
Tim's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
891 views

Is there a relationship between καθαιρέω ("destroy") and καθαίρω ("purify")?

καθαιρέω and καθαίρω look remarkably similar and seem to have similar meanings: "destroy" and "purify/purge," respectively. It came as some surprise to me, though, that I couldn't ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
251 views

Using "u" to transliterate Greek "υ" (upsilon) into English

The typical advice that you receive, when transliterating Greek words into Roman letters, is that Greek υ (upsilon) can either be Roman "y" or "u." (See, for instance, the ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
627 views

What is μέγεθος referring to in Jewish War 3.4

In the Jewish War chapter 3.4, it says: μόνον [οὖν] εὑρίσκει Οὐεσπασιανὸν ταῖς χρείαις ἀναλογοῦντα καὶ τηλικούτου πολέμου μέγεθος ἀναδέξασθαι δυνάμενον "He found only Vespasian a match for the ...
greglo's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
91 views

Are there any unambiguous examples in Biblical or ancient Greek texts where "gymnos" means " wearing a loincloth or light tunic"?

The Latin "nudus" can mean wearing only the first layer of tunic or a loincloth. BAG says gymnos can mean wearing a loincloth. Many writers say that where the Biblical text says that Peter ...
user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
379 views

Can someone explain this choice of word?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I came across this sentence: στρατευόμενος οὖν καὶ αὐτὸς εἰς ταύτας τὰς χώρας, οὓς ἑώρα ἐθέλοντας κινδυνεύειν, τούτους καὶ ἄρχοντας ἐποίει ἧς κατεστρέφετο χώρας, ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
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Is khrysodory Athenaie the accurate way to say Athena's golden spear?

The closest I have come is khrysodory Athenaie (χρυσόδόρυ Αθηναία). Since I am piecing this together from the internet, I am uncertain if this is correct. I have also pieced together the latin, which ...
Walter's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
409 views

Origin of /h/ in ἅζομαι (házomai), ἁγνός (hagnós), ἅγιος (hágios)

According to Wiktionary: ἅζομαι (házomai) ← PH *haďďomai ← PIE *h₁yáǵyeti ἁγνός (hagnós) ← PH *hagnós ← PIE *h₁yáǵnós ἅγιος (hágios) ← PH *hágijos ← PIE *h₁yáǵyos I am aware of Proto-Hellenic /h/ ...
Arfrever's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
617 views

(Ancient and Modern Greek) Pronunciations of ‘epsilon’ and ‘eta’

I asked this question in an online forum, but did not get a response, so I thought I would try it here. It is about the proper pronunciation of the letters ‘epsilon’ and ‘eta’ in Archaic/Ancient Greek,...
Zwing's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
290 views

Bilingual Latin/Greek and English texts online?

I'm currently about halfway through Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I think possibly I might have a crack at Herodotus Histories after that. I found a great source for a bilingual edition of Ανάβασις in Greek ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,051
4 votes
2 answers
306 views

Verb tense when qualified by αεί/αἰέν

In particular, I am wondering about Epic Greek, but I am supposing that the rule is the same in Classical Greek. My question is about what verb tenses are allowed by the adverb αεί when it is ...
Mike's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
107 views

How would the term golden shaft be translated in Latin?

There is a epithet for the greek goddess Artemis, Khryselakatos (Χρυσηλάκατος), which means "of the Golden Shaft." How would one translate that into Latin? The closest I can determine would ...
Walter's user avatar
  • 509
6 votes
3 answers
2k views

How to say good job in Ancient Greek?

Question: If I was a teacher in Ancient Greece, and I wanted to write "good job" or "great job" or "excellent" on a students paper. What text would I write? Thank you so ...
NicWow's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
327 views

How did Αμμόχωστος become Famagusta?

Hope I found the right place to ask and we can avoid a migration to Linguistics or History SE Wikipedia says it is Αμμόχωστος that developed into Famagusta (original Famagouste in French). How did it ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
131 views

Ancient Greek-Latin and Latin-Ancient Greek books II

Is there any book of comparative Ancient Greek-Latin text-based teaching? (I am talking about a parallel method containing e.g. latin texts' fragments translated in ancient greek with comparative ...
SK_'s user avatar
  • 147
2 votes
1 answer
169 views

What's the Difference Between αχρι and μεχρι?

This is a question about ancient Greek language. I thought this would be the best place to post the question as there are other Greek questions here and stack-exchange doesn't have a Greek forum. If ...
Phillip's user avatar
  • 193
3 votes
0 answers
184 views

Can someone explain this word?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I came across this sentence: "--ἀλλ᾽ ἔστι μὲν ἡμῖν, ὦ ἄνδρες, ἀρχὴ πατρᾐα πρὸς μὲν μεσημβρίαν μέχρι οὗ διὰ καῦμα οὐ δύνανται οἰκεῖν ἄνθρωποι, πρὸς δὲ ἄρκτον μέχρι ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
367 views

Which Latin declension do feminine nouns in -o (gen. in -us) belong to?

While the answer should be obvious because of the genitive in -us is for the fourth declension, my question is why they are classified as the fourth declension, seeing that they are all Greek nouns ...
Davide's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
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Greek/Latin lexical or compositorial correspondences

I'm always intrigued by lexical correspondences and kinships and the underlying etymology (where it is not completely obvious, of course), such as between English town and German Zaun, English war and ...
Lumi's user avatar
  • 111
2 votes
1 answer
222 views

Why does the future of εἰμί have the middle voice while the other tenses are active?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I just found this out when I came across this sentence: "κακῶς γὰρ τῶν ἡμετέρων ἐχόντων πάντες οὗτοι οὓς ὁρᾶτε βάρβαροι πολεμιώτεροι ἡμῖν ἔσονται τῶν παρὰ βασιλεῖ ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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9 votes
0 answers
188 views

Why do we say "misogyny" and not "gynemisia"?

The Greek prefixes phobia and philia are commonly used in many words, such as 'gynephilia' and 'androphilia'. Why is 'miso' (from the Greek μῖσος) primarily used as a prefix in words such as 'misogyny'...
user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
288 views

Is Hyksos unique, or is there a rule about when κ + σ doesn't equal ξ?

I was trying to find if there was a true analogue to the spelling of Hyksos in Greek without a ξ. Most instances of words with -κσ- in Classical and Hellenistic Greek were compounds with the prefix εκ-...
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes
0 answers
121 views

Are these transliterations of 11th dynasty names plausibly formed?

Question: Are Mentophis (Μεντῶφις), Monton (Μωντων), and Anatophis (Ἀνατοφις) plausible Greek (and Latin) names for Mentuhotep, Montu, and Intef respectively? Background: Manetho's Egyptian chronicle ...
cmw's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
110 views

Etymology of Acolyte

Why is the Greek word ἀκολουθος borrowed into Latin as acolythus and not acoluthus? Compare Θουκυδιδης and Thucydides.
user67637's user avatar
  • 314
2 votes
1 answer
119 views

How did ἄρρην turn into αρσενικός?

The Greek word for male is αρσενικός. From the Greek Wiktionary page: αρσενικός < (κληρονομημένο) αρχαία ελληνική ἀρσενικός < ἄρρην / ἄρσην I translated it with Google Translate: male < (...
Snack Exchange's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
645 views

Pronunciation of Ancient Greek sigma as voiced [z] before voiced consonants

Throughout the development of Ancient Greek, was σ ever pronounced as [z], perhaps when before a voiced consonant, as in ἄσβεστος?
user67637's user avatar
  • 314
5 votes
1 answer
220 views

How did 15th century Dutch “Van Lanckvelt” correspond to neo-Latin “Macropedius”?

The 15th-century Dutch humanist Georgius Macropedius was originally named Joris van Lanckvelt, and his adopted Latin name is generally described as a direct Latinisation of that, without further ...
Peter LeFanu Lumsdaine's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
848 views

What is this word and what is it doing?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Xenophon. Here Klearchos has basically said: "someone else might want to command at this point". ὡς δὲ τῷ ἀνδρὶ ὃν ἂν ἕλησθε πείσομαι ᾗ δυνατὸν μάλιστα, ἵνα εἰδῆτε ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
86 views

What is the correct way of referring, in Greek, to Theocritus' third Idyll?

I might want to write, in English, something like, "This passage alludes to Theocritus, Idyll III specifically." I think it would be more natural to write "Idyll III" and not "...
Tom Hosker's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
702 views

Four different greek words roughly translated as 'With' - I'm missing one?

I'm not knowledgeable on ancient greek. I was listening to someone who said in passing that ancient greek has (at least) four different words roughly translated as the English word "With". ...
Jamin Grey's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

Capital and non-capital letters in the Greek alphabet

Is there a reason why only some of the capital and non-capital letters of the Greek alphabet are different?
Farcher's user avatar
  • 163
5 votes
1 answer
271 views

Meaning of ἂν here?

I've read that Ανάβασις is quite a good choice for a first Ancient Greek text to read (i.e. relatively simple). This is a bilingual text from somewhere. Ἀρίστιππος δὲ ὁ Θετταλὸς ξένος ὢν ἐτύγχανεν ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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