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Questions tagged [word-order]

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4
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1answer
110 views

The instances where verbs might take the genitive case

In Sixto-Clementine Vulgate we find in Genesis this verse: poenituit eum quod hominum fecisset in terra (Genesis 6:6) "hominum" is in the genetive case which I find strange. I try searching for ...
5
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2answers
182 views

What is the term for extremely loose Latin word order?

For a Latin-language artificial intelligence called Mensa Latina the user manual will need to discuss and therefore refer to the phenomenon in Latin prose where meaning comes from grammar and ...
5
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3answers
98 views

“Semper” in the beginning of a sentence

This is my first attempt at a translation for a motto. My intent is to convey "Always be good" as an advice. I think it is "Semper bonus esto". A quick digression on the motto I'm using Subject+ ...
4
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1answer
145 views

Latin usage & perfect passive finite verb forms

I understand that a perfect passive finite verb is formed by combining the perfect passive participle with the correct form of 'esse'. My question is this: Does it ever happen that the second ...
2
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1answer
60 views

About the “element + plural verb + et + element” word order

In the "Libera me" prayer, the following verse is said: Libera me, Domine, de morte æterna, in die illa tremenda Quando cœli movendi sunt et terra Dum veneris iudicare saeculum per ignem. ...
5
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1answer
57 views

New to Latin—why is the Present Indicative sometimes at the end, and sometimes in the middle of a sentence?

I'm working my way through Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, and I've come across something that's tripping me up when I try to write. Example: Gallia est in Europa (pardon the lack of accents); and ...
0
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1answer
151 views

NSFW - Trying to create a Latin motto for a coat of arms - Edited for clarity

So, I took a couple years of Latin in school, but it's been awhile. I was trying to create this motto, and I'm not sure if I'm declining the nouns properly. Also not sure I remember if word order is ...
3
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2answers
86 views

Does -ne affect word order?

My intuition suggests different word orders with and without the enclitic -ne. For example: Vir canit. — The man sings. Canitne vir? — Does the man sing? I know full well that Latin ...
3
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2answers
102 views

Is my translation (to Latin) correct for this burial quote?

Sorry for the vague title but my request is pretty arbitrary. I'm trying to translate in Latin some kind of poetic quote. I studied Latin in college so I know the basics, but I'd like a confirmation ...
2
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1answer
62 views

“Implied Power”

I am looking for a way to say "Implied Power" in Latin. When I say "Implied Power" I mean to say "Implicit Political Authority." Here is an example to walk readers through what I am trying to get at: ...
8
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1answer
79 views

How do you say “imply” in Latin?

I need to know how to say the present, past and future tense of "imply" in Latin. I don't know much Latin, I just need the grammatically correct way to say: "Implied ______" For example, for "Implied ...
10
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2answers
122 views

Word order in latin

A few days ago, I found the following sentence: Est mea cunctorum terror vox daemoniorum. The sentence is readily translated as "My voice is the fear of all demons". But it prompted another ...
9
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1answer
1k views

Homo Novus vs Novus Homo

To my surprise, the English Wikipedia article about the concept of homines novi is called Novus Homo, not homo novus as I would expect. I have been taught that Latin order is almost always ...
4
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2answers
875 views

Puella Mea OR Mea Puella?

E. E. Cummings wrote a poem called 'Puella Mea'. A quick skim of the omniscient google suggests that 'Mea Puella' might be more accurate. Which would be more accurate, in isolation, when used as a pet ...
5
votes
1answer
279 views

On the word order of “Sapere aude”

In putting together his dictum, Horace, as a native speaker of Latin, perhaps instinctively chose to put first the word "sapere," and then the word "aude," even if, strictly grammatically speaking, "...
6
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1answer
161 views

Corpus analysis of word order frequency

Inspired by an earlier question about Yoda's word order in Latin, I would like to know how common different word orders were in classical Latin. To be more specific, I would like statistical ...
9
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1answer
201 views

Yoda's distinctive speech syntax in Latin, “lost in translation”?

You might be familiar with Yoda's speech style, with phrases like: Powerful you have become... Patience you must have... Wars not make one great... If ..., only pain will you find. As Wikipedia ...
7
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2answers
448 views

Showing which words are emphatic in a Latin sentence

I have the following sentence: Quis lata in silva habitat? Diana, lunae clarae pulchra dea, lata in silva habitat. I initially thought these words were emphatic: Lata, the adjective, because it'...
5
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1answer
68 views

Can the adverb nunc be used in apposition?

For a textbook exercise, I translated this sentence from English into Latin. The terrified Callisto, now a wild animal, avoided men and beasts (animals). (Latin via Ovid) Here's my ...
17
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1answer
225 views

Can “si etiam” have the same meaning as “etiam si”?

As is well known, "etiam si" is a Latin conjunction that means "even if." Are there any examples in Classical or Medieval Latin in which reversing the word order and saying "si etiam" preserves the ...
4
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3answers
114 views

Word order with relative clauses

Last night I watched the movie Matilda, which I really liked, and I decided to write a few sentences about it in Latin. I was attempting to write a sentence involving a relative clause, when I became ...
3
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1answer
240 views

Trying to translate “Best Man, True Friend, Bad Influence” into latin for an inscription

I'm trying to translate "Best Man - True Friend - Bad Influence" into Latin for a gift inscription for (unsurprisingly) my best man. So far I've got to "Optimum Vir - Verum Amicus - Malum Auctoritas." ...
6
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1answer
71 views

Need a Latin backronym for military unit - defensive, national, secret

I came up with legio apsconditus defensorius patriae, but it doesn't really suit my need (and is not quite correct). For certain project of mine it has to be acronymable to "PLDN" (preferred) or "...
8
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3answers
126 views

Elementary word order question

Why is this word order correct, as opposed to putting the verb at the end of the sentence? Frater meus habet unum filium. This site supplied this quote.
14
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2answers
338 views

What word order resolves the ambiguity of two nominative nouns in a sentence?

This question is a beginner's confusion about sentences of the form: [subject_noun] [object_noun] est. E.g. Bob agricola est. From my understanding, both the subject and object are declined in ...
12
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1answer
201 views

Did word order have any function in colloquial Latin?

In Latin, word order is mostly free. This is used intensively by poets and other authors to achieve a desired rhythm or rhetoric figures like chiasms. However, this does not apply to regular, spoken ...
12
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1answer
850 views

Why might “Philosophiae Doctor” (the source of “Ph.D.”) have been preferred over “Doctor Philosophiae”?

The English abbreviation Ph.D. comes from the Latin for Doctor of Philosophy, which I understand would be either Philosophiae Doctor or Doctor Philosophiae. I know word order is flexible in Latin, ...