Questions tagged [word-comparison]

For questions about comparing two or more words, not for comparative forms of adjectives.

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12 votes
3 answers
953 views

What's the difference between aster, stella, sidus and astrum in Latin?

aster, stella, sidus and astrum are are all nearly means or related to stars. But are there any key differences between these words ?
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5 votes
1 answer
204 views

Relationship between συμφορά and συμφέρω

A συμφορά generally means a "misfortune"; συμφέρω, however, is unambiguously positive: "to be beneficial." It's a little strange that τὰ συμφέροντα and συμφορά are (essentially) ...
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5 votes
1 answer
160 views

Latin Equivalent of "Comparing Apples and Oranges"

Is there an equivalent Latin expression that is similar to "comparing apples and oranges"? For example: Person 1: Our hockey goalie is so much better than your hockey goalie! Our hockey ...
5 votes
1 answer
332 views

'Aurifer' or 'Auriferus'?

What is the masculine form of "Aurifera" ? I supposed it was "auriferus": Tibicen auriferus is like a goldish beetle. http://www.masscic.org/sightings/cicadas/tibicen-auriferus-in-...
7 votes
2 answers
167 views

The difference between ᾰ̓́στρον (ástron) and ἀστήρ (astḗr) in Ancient Greek

The words ᾰ̓́στρον (ástron) and ᾰ̓στήρ (astḗr) both apparently refer to a celestial body (typically stars and planets). Other than ᾰ̓́στρον being a 'second declension' noun and ᾰ̓στήρ being a 'third ...
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2 votes
0 answers
62 views

Prana = anima or spiritus?

On p. 188 of Breath, James Nestor writes: The concept of prana was first documented in India and China…, some 3,000 years ago, and became the bedrock of medicine. The Chinese called it ch'i and ...
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6 votes
1 answer
92 views

What is the difference in meaning between postposition "causa" and preposition "propter"?

What is the difference in meaning between the postposition "causa" and the preposition "propter"? Both mean "because", right?
10 votes
2 answers
667 views

Minimal pair for hidden quantity

Is there an example where the quantity of a vowel makes a difference in a syllable that is heavy by position? For a concrete example, this does happen in Finnish (where long vowels are written as ...
2 votes
2 answers
112 views

Difference between erga and quoad?

In medieval Latin, is there a difference between erga and quoad? They both seem to mean "with respect to".
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4 votes
1 answer
170 views

What is the difference between the words petere and interrogare?

I was trying to say something around the lines of what more to ask which it's kind of an idiom which I think it means something around the lines of "I don't need to ask for anything else"? ...
13 votes
1 answer
4k views

cunnilingus vs cunnilinctus

I'm interested in the morphology of these two words. How are they structured and does their structure affect their meaning at all?
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-1 votes
1 answer
106 views

Are Κηφάς (a Greek proper name), κεϕαλή (head), and πέτρος (rock) etymologically related?

Saint Peter was named Cephas by Jesus, which is recorded in the gospels as the Greek translation Πέτρος. Are Κηφάς (a Greek proper name < Aramaic כיפא‎, kēp̄ā, "rock"), κεϕαλή (head), and ...
  • 3,208
4 votes
2 answers
285 views

Suavis vs. dulcis

What is the difference between "suavis" and "dulcis"? Are they synonymous?
  • 3,208
1 vote
0 answers
112 views

Are pignus, pinguedo, & piger etymologically related?

Are pignus (pledge), pinguedo (fat), and piger (lazy person) etymologically related? de Vaan p. 465 says: The etymology [of pignus] is uncertain, since one can imagine a meaning "pledge, surety&...
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3 votes
1 answer
280 views

commence < commensa = "joint table"?

M. J. Toswell, Today's Medieval University p. 24 claims a new master would eat at the commensa, the joint table, after his commencement ceremony of stepping upward Does the English word "...
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5 votes
1 answer
312 views

Are ἄρσην, ἄρσις and θήλυ, θέσις etymologically related?

In Mt. 19:14, "άρσεν και θήλυ" means "male and female". In music terminology ἄρσις means a stressed/emphasized sound, and θέσις the corresponding unstressed one. Is ἄρσις ...
  • 3,208
2 votes
1 answer
197 views

Amar vs encantar in Latin

As I've understood it, in Spanish there's a difference between using amar for people and encantar for things. Is there a similar difference in Latin? This page describes the difference: https://...
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7 votes
2 answers
751 views

Did the Romans use 'animus' and 'anima' together?

The words animus and anima are pretty close to each other, and their difference has been explored on this site before. In order to understand their nuances in classical Latin I would like to see an ...
1 vote
1 answer
102 views

Are "pater", "parens", "parturitio", & "partitio" etymologically related?

Are pater (father), parens (procreator), parturitio (parturition), and partitio (partition) etymologically related? Phonetic and semantic similarities lead me to think they might be related. I can't ...
  • 3,208
10 votes
1 answer
627 views

Differences between cano and canto

In Cap. X of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces the verb cano, having introduced canto in a previous chapter. The usage of both so far is just sing, but are there more nuanced differences between the two? From ...
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6 votes
1 answer
814 views

When to use ae vs a for plurals?

I'm reading Familia Romana book and encountered these 2 sentences. Corsica et Sardinia insulae magnae sunt. And Brundisium et Sparta oppida magna sunt. Why does the ae changes to a and vice versa?
4 votes
1 answer
164 views

What is the relation and history of 'si' and 'sic'?

Lewis and Short tell me that sic comes from si by adding the particle -ce. I can understand sice wearing down to sic, but I do not quite understand how I am supposed to understand the meanings of the ...
6 votes
1 answer
228 views

Two levels of 'and'

What I am looking for is best illustrate by an example, so please excuse the detour. In Finnish there are two words for "and": "ja" and "sekä". When used together, "...
10 votes
1 answer
276 views

Lonely vs. alone

A person is alone when there are no other people around. A person is lonely when the presence of other people is missed. Neither implies the other; you can be lonely but not alone or alone but not ...
3 votes
0 answers
135 views

What are the differences between "demens" and "insanus"? Are there any single Latin words (nouns) for "insane person"?

First, I'm struggling with understanding the difference between demens and insanum. My understanding is that demens is an adjective (insane). I've also seen insanum in a few online dictionaries (here'...
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6 votes
1 answer
736 views

Can we finally know the difference between these words?

There seem to be four different Latin words, all of which are common, and all of which seem to mean exactly the same thing, "finally": tandem denique demum postremo Is there any difference ...
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4 votes
2 answers
290 views

What is the difference between etiam and enim?

In Latin etiam and enim seem to have pretty similar meanings. I notice that both Greek and Latin seem to use connective words like this a lot, I suppose because they had no punctuation, so they serve ...
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6 votes
1 answer
191 views

Euler passage translation (Latin in 18th century)

I would like to include a translation of a brief passage from Euler's music text Tentamen novae theoriae musicae (1739) in an article I am writing, but find the original somewhat tricky to work with. ...
8 votes
1 answer
603 views

Difference between 'urbe' and 'oppidum'?

I have found that LLPSI uses oppidum to describe cities (at least in the early chapters) while Duolingo uses urbe. What is the difference, and which should I usually use?
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11 votes
2 answers
4k views

Distinguishing house from home

The common word domus can mean both "house" and "home". How can I make a distinction between a house and a home in Latin? For example, I might buy a house but it doesn't feel like ...
3 votes
0 answers
61 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
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1 vote
0 answers
44 views

Romans and Ancient Greek language [duplicate]

Is there evidence in the inscriptions, that Romans have realised, that Hellenic languages are very close to theirs own language!? It seems to be that the distinguish was applied to the Etruscan ...
  • 329
2 votes
1 answer
147 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus (is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
4 votes
1 answer
93 views

Τέλος vs. πέρας

Meanings of πέρας listed in wiktionary: end, goal, extremity All these fall within the scope of τέλος. I would like to understand the nuances of these three meanings (there is no problem with ...
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8 votes
1 answer
146 views

When/whether to use "ineō" instead of "eō"

I am learning Latin for the first time this year, and I have a question about the usage of the verb 'eō', I go. The textbook that I am using, Henle Latin 1st Year, lists 'eō' as follows: eō, īre, ...
2 votes
1 answer
205 views

Is there any difference between "minime" and "minume"?

Prompted by cnread's answer to another question, I wanted to ask: is there any difference between mĭnĭmē and mĭnŭmē? The linked L&S entries do not offer any obvious commentary. A quick corpus ...
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7 votes
1 answer
644 views

Difference between αὐτός and οὗτος

In the sentence οὗτος λέγει ὅτι αὕτη τὸ βιβλίον γράφει translated by "He says that she is writing the book." would the meaning change if οὗτος was substituted by αὐτός thus forming the sentence αὐτός ...
9 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is the difference between "lux" and "lumen"?

Latin has two common words for "light": lux and lumen. What are the differences between these two words? Are there any contexts in which one would be appropriate while the other would not? It would ...
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1 vote
1 answer
514 views

About the difference between the enclitic "ne" and the non-enclitic "ne"

So, I know that -ne is an enclitic to express a yes/no question. But, the "Ne", as a non-enclitic, as I understood it, could also be a word question. In "Ne....annon" or "Ne....necne" Meaning Is it....
  • 1,706
4 votes
2 answers
168 views

Difference between Sententia and Opinio?

Could you give some examples of sentences showing the difference between Opinio and Sentencia? Aren't both good translations for "opinions?" "Through" and "opinion" seems to be translated by both: ...
  • 1,706
3 votes
1 answer
259 views

Meanings of cibus, and cibi

The dictionary I use tells me that Cibus, could mean "food", or "meals" or "dishes", and many other related meanings. So, I find logical, that, when you have the plural, it means rather meals/dishes. ...
  • 1,706
4 votes
1 answer
62 views

How do you translate "My potions are too strong for you?"

It is really just the "are too strong for you" I am having trouble with. We haven't gone over how to say stuff like that in class yet. Would you use the superlative?
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3 votes
1 answer
75 views

Are the two types of lustra distinguishable?

One meaning of the word lustrum is a sacrifice for purification done every five years; another is a house of ill repute. I'd always figured that the two were complete homophones. However, someone ...
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5 votes
1 answer
222 views

Difference between "senex "and "senilis"?

What would be the differences in uses of "senilis" and "senex". I know "senilis" is constructed with senex+illis, it should help me, but I don't get it. Thank you.
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2 votes
2 answers
137 views

How was 'fissiparus' mistakenly analogized with 'vīviparus'?

Is the Wiktionary entry on fissiparous below correct? Why's the analogy "mistaken"? The compounding makes sense to me? Etymology An adaptation of the New Latin fissiparus, from fissus (“...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why is the phrase "horror vacui" commonly interpreted as "nature abhors a vacuum"?

Why is the Latin phrase: horror vacui commonly interpreted as: nature abhors a vacuum? It may well be Aristotle's intended message, given the context, but it seems like a bit of a jump. Doesn't it? ...
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16 votes
6 answers
9k views

Is Cola "probably the best-known" Latin word in the world? If not, which might it be?

I found this in an ecological park: Cola is actually a Latin word (a scientific one, referring to the plant), albeit its etymology is African. I am curious about whether it is "probably" the best-...
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6 votes
2 answers
2k views

Uter vs. Uterque

The way I learned 'uter' and 'uterque' was as follows. 'Uter' is like the Greek 'πότερος', meaning (in interrogative uses) 'which, of two?' and (in non-interrogative uses) 'either, of two'. I learned ...
  • 91
6 votes
1 answer
215 views

<quality> even for being a <noun>

Salvēte omnēs, hocc erit mihi prīmum rogātum hāc in sēde. Haud dūdum vīdī quendam hominem scīscitārī, quōmodo posset Latīnē dīcī "he has a long tail, even for a cat". Ad quod rogātum cum respondēre ...
7 votes
1 answer
156 views

ἤ = vel or ἤ = aut?

LSJ says ἤ is a "disjunctive or", but does it correspond Latin's vel ("inclusive disjunction") or aut ("exclusive disjunction")?
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