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Questions tagged [word-comparison]

For questions about comparing two or more words, not for comparative forms of adjectives.

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Does verus (true) etymologically derive from viridis / vireo (green / to be green)? [closed]

Does verus (true) etymologically derive from viridis / vireo (green / to be green)? See my previous question "Are vir and virgo etymologically related?", in which St. Isidore shows that ...
Geremia's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
92 views

Why is computatorium considered to be a better word than computatrum? (For the English word "computer")

I was watching a Luke Ranieri video in which he mentioned that computatrum isn't a very good word for computer, and that computatorium is much better, and that people should stop using computatrum. ...
Nomad1004's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
891 views

Is there a relationship between καθαιρέω ("destroy") and καθαίρω ("purify")?

καθαιρέω and καθαίρω look remarkably similar and seem to have similar meanings: "destroy" and "purify/purge," respectively. It came as some surprise to me, though, that I couldn't ...
brianpck's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
64 views

Adverbial numeral for the "teen"s

I noticed this numeral while reading Regulus, the Latin version of the Little Prince. In the scene that the businessman shows his sum of stars, he says: Cinq cent un millions six cent vingt-deux ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
137 views

sempiternus vs. æternus

What's the difference between sempiternus ("always eternal") and æternus ("eternal")? Does æternus refer to creatures (e.g., angels and human souls) that were created in time but ...
Geremia's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
722 views

What's the difference between "ultio" and "vindicta"?

my Latin is terrible and a buddy of mine wants a proper translation for a tattoo, “Revenge is in the hands of the father” and I am getting mixed up by vindicta and ultio. Would it be, “Ultio in ...
TattooFriend's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
145 views

What is the best Latin translation of 'towards truth'?

I am looking to create a Substack publication where I can share articles I have written on philosophy. I want to choose a name for the website that best summarises or encapsulates the nature of the ...
Joseph's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
2k views

How to say "after all" in Latin?

Wiktionary says "after all" is a prepositional phrase. It shows these three words: denique, demum, tandem The English-Latin dictionary I have says it's an adverbial phrase. It shows these ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
214 views

What is the difference between the Greek words "χρονος" and "καιρος", both meaning "time"?

In my YouTube video explaining why I don't believe in afterlife, I used, among others, the following argument I came up by myself: Et si homines habent animam quae tempus potest sentire, quomodo id ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

What are the differences between these three words linguistically?

According to Annals of Tacitus there are three words that derive from "Arsac": Arsacis (e.g. VI:33) Arsacidis (XIII:37) Arsacidarum (e.g. XII:10) What are the differences between these ...
user64617's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
264 views

What is difference between adit and advenit?

In LLPSI I was introduced to two verbs "adit" and "advenit", but what is difference between them if both of them mean "to go to"? Same to "abit" and "exit&...
Umicron's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
72 views

Best translation - "Live Deliberately" - vive de industria? vive deliberate? vive consilium?

What would the best translation of "Live Deliberately" be as a motto? I'm thinking of a few different phrases: vive de industria? vive deliberate? vive consilium? Not sure what is best. ...
Bad Pockett's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
191 views

Differences between natio, populus, vulgus, cultus, and societas?

Is there a distinct differentiation between the words natio, populus, vulgus, cultus, and societas in classical Latin? I'm encountering conflicting definitions in various dictionaries.
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3 votes
2 answers
147 views

Difference between ἑβδομάς and Σάββατον?

Searching for "week" in the LXX Septuagint, I think hebdomas is used for the entire week as a whole, whereas Sabbath for weekdays, and weekend. But hebdomados could be used for the week as ...
Michael16's user avatar
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16 votes
1 answer
3k views

Both "fēmina" and "mulier" mean "woman": what's the difference?

The word fēmina is used with the meaning "woman": Of human beings, a female, woman (cf.: uxor, mulier, matrona; conjux, marita) (Lewis and Short) (Fēmina also means "female" when ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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11 votes
3 answers
5k views

What's the difference between aster, stella, sidus and astrum in Latin?

aster, stella, sidus and astrum are are all nearly means or related to stars. But are there any key differences between these words ?
imdevskp's user avatar
  • 219
5 votes
1 answer
219 views

Relationship between συμφορά and συμφέρω

A συμφορά generally means a "misfortune"; συμφέρω, however, is unambiguously positive: "to be beneficial." It's a little strange that τὰ συμφέροντα and συμφορά are (essentially) ...
brianpck's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
192 views

Latin Equivalent of "Comparing Apples and Oranges"

Is there an equivalent Latin expression that is similar to "comparing apples and oranges"? For example: Person 1: Our hockey goalie is so much better than your hockey goalie! Our hockey ...
stats_noob's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
339 views

'Aurifer' or 'Auriferus'?

What is the masculine form of "Aurifera" ? I supposed it was "auriferus": Tibicen auriferus is like a goldish beetle. http://www.masscic.org/sightings/cicadas/tibicen-auriferus-in-...
ephesinus's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
424 views

The difference between ᾰ̓́στρον (ástron) and ἀστήρ (astḗr) in Ancient Greek

The words ᾰ̓́στρον (ástron) and ᾰ̓στήρ (astḗr) both apparently refer to a celestial body (typically stars and planets). Other than ᾰ̓́στρον being a 'second declension' noun and ᾰ̓στήρ being a 'third ...
Pharap's user avatar
  • 177
2 votes
0 answers
110 views

Prana = anima or spiritus?

On p. 188 of Breath, James Nestor writes: The concept of prana was first documented in India and China…, some 3,000 years ago, and became the bedrock of medicine. The Chinese called it ch'i and ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
155 views

What is the difference in meaning between postposition "causa" and preposition "propter"?

What is the difference in meaning between the postposition "causa" and the preposition "propter"? Both mean "because", right?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
717 views

Minimal pair for hidden quantity

Is there an example where the quantity of a vowel makes a difference in a syllable that is heavy by position? For a concrete example, this does happen in Finnish (where long vowels are written as ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
144 views

Difference between erga and quoad?

In medieval Latin, is there a difference between erga and quoad? They both seem to mean "with respect to".
Geremia's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
230 views

What is the difference between the words petere and interrogare?

I was trying to say something around the lines of what more to ask which it's kind of an idiom which I think it means something around the lines of "I don't need to ask for anything else"? ...
Johhan Santana's user avatar
13 votes
1 answer
5k views

cunnilingus vs cunnilinctus

I'm interested in the morphology of these two words. How are they structured and does their structure affect their meaning at all?
Bill Heap's user avatar
  • 333
-1 votes
1 answer
163 views

Are Κηφάς (a Greek proper name), κεϕαλή (head), and πέτρος (rock) etymologically related?

Saint Peter was named Cephas by Jesus, which is recorded in the gospels as the Greek translation Πέτρος. Are Κηφάς (a Greek proper name < Aramaic כיפא‎, kēp̄ā, "rock"), κεϕαλή (head), and ...
Geremia's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
362 views

Suavis vs. dulcis

What is the difference between "suavis" and "dulcis"? Are they synonymous?
Geremia's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
117 views

Are pignus, pinguedo, & piger etymologically related?

Are pignus (pledge), pinguedo (fat), and piger (lazy person) etymologically related? de Vaan p. 465 says: The etymology [of pignus] is uncertain, since one can imagine a meaning "pledge, surety&...
Geremia's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
290 views

commence < commensa = "joint table"?

M. J. Toswell, Today's Medieval University p. 24 claims a new master would eat at the commensa, the joint table, after his commencement ceremony of stepping upward Does the English word "...
Geremia's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
338 views

Are ἄρσην, ἄρσις and θήλυ, θέσις etymologically related?

In Mt. 19:14, "άρσεν και θήλυ" means "male and female". In music terminology ἄρσις means a stressed/emphasized sound, and θέσις the corresponding unstressed one. Is ἄρσις ...
Geremia's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
257 views

Amar vs encantar in Latin

As I've understood it, in Spanish there's a difference between using amar for people and encantar for things. Is there a similar difference in Latin? This page describes the difference: https://...
Teson's user avatar
  • 131
7 votes
2 answers
975 views

Did the Romans use 'animus' and 'anima' together?

The words animus and anima are pretty close to each other, and their difference has been explored on this site before. In order to understand their nuances in classical Latin I would like to see an ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
181 views

Are "pater", "parens", "parturitio", & "partitio" etymologically related?

Are pater (father), parens (procreator), parturitio (parturition), and partitio (partition) etymologically related? Phonetic and semantic similarities lead me to think they might be related. I can't ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,682
11 votes
1 answer
938 views

Differences between cano and canto

In Cap. X of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces the verb cano, having introduced canto in a previous chapter. The usage of both so far is just sing, but are there more nuanced differences between the two? From ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,592
6 votes
1 answer
1k views

When to use ae vs a for plurals?

I'm reading Familia Romana book and encountered these 2 sentences. Corsica et Sardinia insulae magnae sunt. And Brundisium et Sparta oppida magna sunt. Why does the ae changes to a and vice versa?
Johhan Santana's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
256 views

What is the relation and history of 'si' and 'sic'?

Lewis and Short tell me that sic comes from si by adding the particle -ce. I can understand sice wearing down to sic, but I do not quite understand how I am supposed to understand the meanings of the ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
250 views

Two levels of 'and'

What I am looking for is best illustrate by an example, so please excuse the detour. In Finnish there are two words for "and": "ja" and "sekä". When used together, "...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
329 views

Lonely vs. alone

A person is alone when there are no other people around. A person is lonely when the presence of other people is missed. Neither implies the other; you can be lonely but not alone or alone but not ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
175 views

What are the differences between "demens" and "insanus"? Are there any single Latin words (nouns) for "insane person"?

First, I'm struggling with understanding the difference between demens and insanum. My understanding is that demens is an adjective (insane). I've also seen insanum in a few online dictionaries (here'...
mig81's user avatar
  • 253
7 votes
1 answer
814 views

Can we finally know the difference between these words?

There seem to be four different Latin words, all of which are common, and all of which seem to mean exactly the same thing, "finally": tandem denique demum postremo Is there any difference ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 6,991
3 votes
3 answers
479 views

What is the difference between 'etiam' and 'enim'?

In Latin etiam and enim seem to have pretty similar meanings. I notice that both Greek and Latin seem to use connective words like this a lot, I suppose because they had no punctuation, so they serve ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 6,991
6 votes
1 answer
203 views

Euler passage translation (Latin in 18th century)

I would like to include a translation of a brief passage from Euler's music text Tentamen novae theoriae musicae (1739) in an article I am writing, but find the original somewhat tricky to work with. ...
Thomas Nicholson's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
920 views

Difference between 'urbe' and 'oppidum'?

I have found that LLPSI uses oppidum to describe cities (at least in the early chapters) while Duolingo uses urbe. What is the difference, and which should I usually use?
James's user avatar
  • 529
12 votes
2 answers
5k views

Distinguishing house from home

The common word domus can mean both "house" and "home". How can I make a distinction between a house and a home in Latin? For example, I might buy a house but it doesn't feel like ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
98 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
K-HB's user avatar
  • 420
1 vote
0 answers
48 views

Romans and Ancient Greek language [duplicate]

Is there evidence in the inscriptions, that Romans have realised, that Hellenic languages are very close to theirs own language!? It seems to be that the distinguish was applied to the Etruscan ...
TrmIntrs2's user avatar
  • 329
2 votes
1 answer
155 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus (is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
103 views

Τέλος vs. πέρας

Meanings of πέρας listed in wiktionary: end, goal, extremity All these fall within the scope of τέλος. I would like to understand the nuances of these three meanings (there is no problem with ...
Pavel V.'s user avatar
  • 1,863
8 votes
1 answer
164 views

When/whether to use "ineō" instead of "eō"

I am learning Latin for the first time this year, and I have a question about the usage of the verb 'eō', I go. The textbook that I am using, Henle Latin 1st Year, lists 'eō' as follows: eō, īre, ...
Jacob Lockard's user avatar