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4
votes
1answer
63 views

Substantivization of “continuum”

I wonder how to translate "continuum hypothesis" into Latin. Indeed, "continuum" is an adjective in Latin (so we would have "continuous hypothesis" if we were trying a literal translation) and I don't ...
1
vote
0answers
20 views

Translation to latin of “everything is revenge”

I'm trying to translate a phrase. I'm trying to say "everything is (part of) revenge", as in "every action is an act of revenge against the ones that tried to break you". Sorry if it's not too clear ...
5
votes
1answer
169 views

May they rest in peace

This may become an inscription written on a historical marker commemorating a mass grave. Which of the following is correct: Requiesce in Pace or Requiescant in Pace? The former was offered up by a ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

Etymology of the adjective ‘idoneus’

All etymological dictionaries includung Wiktionary and De Vaan’s Etymological Dictionary state the ultimate origin of the Latin adjective idoneus (‘suitable’; ‘sufficient’) is unknown. I was ...
6
votes
1answer
159 views

Origins of the adjective ‘inanis’

According to Wiktionary and De Vaan’s Etymological Dictionary, the etymology of the Latin adjective inanis (‘empty’; ‘worthless’) is unknown. I was wondering if anybody had a theory on the origin of ...
5
votes
2answers
175 views

Why distinguish u/v but not i/j?

Latin Wikipedia and many other modern (Classical?) Latin texts use "u" for the vowel /u/ and "v" for the consonant /w/, but "i" for both the vowel /i/ and the consonant /j/. This practice is more ...
4
votes
1answer
59 views

When does est go at the end of a sentence?

How do i know when to put the latin word 'est' at the end of a sentence? For example: Scintilla fessa est, Scintilla est femina Why is 'est' in a different position in each of the above sentences.
6
votes
1answer
170 views

Why had the word “gold” morphed from “ausum” into “aurum”?

Etymologists/Linguists posit that the prefix for gold in Proto-Indo-European was: *aus- Which gave way to *auzom in Proto-Italic languages and ausum in Classical Latin. At some point, ausum ...
5
votes
1answer
92 views

In which cases the enclitic -ne is optional, and and in which is it mandatory?

As I get it, -ne is used to play the role of a question word when there's no question word, and of course, when it's a yes-no question. But is it good practice to omit it in such questions? Is it a ...
4
votes
1answer
98 views

Optimus and the comparative and superlative uses of adjectives in Latin

What are the superlative and comparative forms of "optimus"? Why is it also used as a simple adjective, meaning simply "excellent" and not a comparative? Isn't "optimus" a suppletive comparative for ...
6
votes
1answer
264 views

A poem that works in both Latin and Italian

Years ago an old colleague showed me a poem which had a miraculous feature: it was perfectly valid Latin and perfectly valid Italian. With clever choices of words one can make that happen, but it also ...
8
votes
1answer
94 views

In Ancient Greek, why ἑπτά vs. ἕβδομος?

I was marveling today at the word hebdomadal, from the Greek ἑπτά for seven. But that had me wondering why words derived from seven sometimes use /bd/ and other times /pt/. I notice, for instance, ...
6
votes
1answer
353 views

Translate “loyal animal” into classical Latin

I am translating the short phrase "loyal animal", or "faithful animal" into classical Latin. In this case, "animal" is intentionally very broad - I don't want to limit it to just domesticated animals ...
1
vote
1answer
61 views

Gerundial arguments selected by verbs taking Genitive: e.g., “Memento moriendi”? “Me paenitet vivendi”?

As a follow-up of two previous questions on Latin grammar, I was wondering if examples like Memento moriendi (cf. Memento mori) and Me paenitet vivendi (cf. Me paenitet vivere) are also attested. ...
2
votes
0answers
23 views

Meaning of “condition-ut-extremis” in Dune

Excerpt From: Frank Herbert, Dune “The wisdom of seeding the known universe with a prophecy pattern for the protection of B.G. personnel has long been appreciated, but never have we seen a condition-...
5
votes
1answer
95 views

How did the Romans refer to people of unknown gender?

Reference to other people's gender has become a delicate issue in today's world. I expect that the Romans had no controversy over it, but they must have encountered situations where they have to write ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

“If you can breath, you can stand. If you can stand, you can fight.”

I'm trying to help my sister. She heard this phrase that she like to have tattooed but she wanted it to be in Latin. Now I haven't been practicing for a few years so I could use with some help. The ...
8
votes
1answer
201 views

Is my translation correct?

I translated "illuminate my heart/soul/mind" as "illuminas animus meus" in Latin. I know "animus" doesn't directly translates to heart but I want to express these 3 things in a word and it seems fit. ...
2
votes
1answer
70 views

Memento Mori: Indirect Speech

In Q: Memento Mori--Revisited I attempted to develop the idea of C. M. Weimer that "Memento Mori" could be translated indirectly, giving "Remember that you can die"; improving, hopefully, to "Remember ...
4
votes
0answers
52 views

Why is the form “Antares” used as an ablative in some Latin texts?

Jam inquiro nomen stellae Antares. Multa documenta quae "ab Antares" dicunt comperi. At non scio ablativi qui in "es" terminantur. Potestne nomen "Antares" indeclinabile esse? Quare? Exempla: "Lanx ...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

How do you say “you first” in Latin with all the options for saying you

I would like to say “you first” in Latin. With all the different ways to say you (tu/vos....I can’t remember it that well from school)....with the correct corresponding first.... Thanks so much!!!!
2
votes
1answer
55 views

How did 'licentiare' semantically shift to mean employment dismissal?

I was researching the etymology for the French licencier, and Wiktionary refers to Latin licentiare. I can't see it exhibited in Oxford Latin Dictionary (2012 2 ed) but Latdict does. Please see the ...
5
votes
1answer
74 views

Generic toast in classical Latin

Was there a generic toast that Romans would say to each other when drinking, along the lines of Cheers, or Sláinte. It doesn't need to have the meaning of those so much as have the same cultural usage:...
2
votes
2answers
77 views

How do I translate this phrase?

The phrase is "apud milites questus fratrem sibi insidias comparare". I know all the words individually but for some reason, the sentence just is not coming together in my mind. To give some context, ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

Are the two types of lustra distinguishable?

One meaning of the word lustrum is a sacrifice for purification done every five years; another is a house of ill repute. I'd always figured that the two were complete homophones. However, someone ...
6
votes
2answers
122 views

Vergil Book XII, Line 756 | Meter Question

"tum vero exoritur clamor ripaeque lacusque" When you do the meter for this line, if you do the elision it does not work out, having 6 feet and all. So, to make it work what I had to do was not do ...
3
votes
2answers
44 views

Indirect questions and the passive subjunctive

How would you translate: "He asked if the the city had been captured?" Quaerit num civitatem captum esse? Here I am using an accusative (captum) plus infinitive (esse). Am I right? Thank you!
3
votes
2answers
83 views

Latin words over this door?

We took our son to college and this was written over one of the doors on campus. I cannot figure out what it means! Can anyone here help? I assume it is Latin, but...
5
votes
1answer
257 views

Under what conditions can “length by position” occur, and what does it actually mean?

I am studying Latin and one of the definitions in my textbook is kind of confusing. A syllable can be long in one of two ways: Length by nature. If the syllable contains a long vowel or ...
14
votes
4answers
3k views

What does this text mean with capitalized letters?

I saw this text carved at the foot of a statue in Klagenfurt, Austria: I guess it's in Latin and Google translate gave me a sketchy translation. But I don't get why some letters are capitalized? ...
2
votes
1answer
99 views

Pronunciation of “Formulæ”

What is the pronunciation of Formulæ in Latin ? Is there any difference (in pronunciation) between classical and vulgar Latin ? The answer can be in International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) format.
10
votes
1answer
2k views

Translate “Everything burns” into classical Latin

In a project of mine I have an event which was named "everything burns", or potentially "Everything burned" (I am open to both tenses). What would this be in classical Latin? I tentatively have this ...
7
votes
2answers
68 views

Shuffling Latin sentences

So, I have heard an interesting claim about Latin, and I wonder how true it is. The claim is, given that Latin has declensions, you can shuffle words around and keep the sentence's meaning. Is that ...
1
vote
1answer
91 views

Memento Mori--Revisited

In Q:What does memento mori actually mean? there does not appear to be a natural conclusion. Apposite contributions appeared as comments but were not developed. Perhaps it was believed that the Q. had ...
10
votes
3answers
5k views

How do you translate “Don't Fear the Reaper” into Latin?

In T. Pratchett's Discworld series, Death's motto is "Non Timetis Messor", meant to be a translation of "Don't Fear the Reaper". But in other books he uses "Timetere", and I am unsure of which would ...
4
votes
2answers
190 views

How long is a banana?

The word banana and variants thereof appear in a number of languages. The origin appears to be the word banaana in Wolof, if Wikipedia is to be trusted. This word is straightforward to adopt into ...
7
votes
2answers
994 views

Translate “iconoclast” to classical Latin

I am translating "iconoclast" into classical Latin. It was translated into Ecclesiastical Latin as Iconoclasta, but I would rather translate it from the original Byzantine Greek meaning of image-...
4
votes
2answers
83 views

Is “ante a priori” correct?

As I understand it, "a posteriori" means "from the latter," and "a priori" means "from the former." Suppose there was something predating the former in the context above. How would that be expressed ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

What evidence is there of a short vowel in the first syllable of “vallum”?

Two sources that I've come across indicate a long vowel /aː/ in the first syllable of the word vallum 'palisade wall' (that is, vāllum). This form is given in The Latin Language, by Charles E. ...
5
votes
3answers
911 views

Does “Op. cit.” stand for “opus citatum” or “opere citato”?

Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary says "opere citato" American Heritage Dictionary, Collins and Oxford (at Lexico.com) say "opere citato" Merriam Webster Dictionary has an entry ...
5
votes
2answers
130 views

“Venire ad” or “Venire in”?

When can I use "venire ad", or "venire in". (excepting the few locative cases) What kind of buildings, place, etc, can accept the one or the other? Is "venire ad" insists more on the move than "in"? ...
5
votes
1answer
59 views

Difference between “senex ”and “senilis”?

What would be the differences in uses of "senilis" and "senex". I know "senilis" is constructed with senex+illis, it should help me, but I don't get it. Thank you.
3
votes
1answer
45 views

An epigram in Latin

Nam id facinus inprimis ego memorabile existimo sceleris atque periculi novitate. Sallust vom Catilina. This is an epigram to Friedrich Schiller's "die Verschvörung des Fiesco zu Genua" (in Gutenberg ...
3
votes
1answer
151 views

When were /k/ and /q/ first distinguished in the Greek or Latin alphabet?

Nowadays, in languages which make a distinction between velar and uvular stops, it's common to use K for the first and Q for the second. This is best-known nowadays from transcriptions of Arabic names,...
5
votes
0answers
63 views

Why didn't readers prefer spacing to scriptio continua before 600 A.D.? [duplicate]

Naomi Baron. Words Onscreen: The Fate of Reading in a Digital World (1 edn 2015). Top of p. 21. I'm assuming that even in one's L1, “spaced words make it easier to decode in your head”. Why ...
6
votes
1answer
90 views

Origin of “haru-” in “haruspex”

I am trying to understand better the etymon of the first part of the word haruspex. The Wiktionary entry and other sources mention «haru- (“intestines”)», but there seems to be no Latin word *haru or ...
9
votes
2answers
331 views

Present participles of the verb esse

Inspired by the answers to this question, I want to ask about the different present participles of esse over time and their fate. I am aware that esse is a defective verb that classically does not ...
3
votes
1answer
71 views

Finer Tuning on Expressions-of-Time

Qs have been asked about expressions-of-time, of the type: "in the second year" = "secondo anno"; "within three days" = "tribus diebus"; "for two years" = "(per) duos annos" ("per" is optional) which ...
5
votes
1answer
61 views

Translating part of the preface of the Clementine Vulgate

I wanted eliminate all acronyms from my digital copy of the Clementine Vulgate, when I came across this acronym: S.R.E, which I'm pretty sure it means Sancta Romana Ecclesia (Holy Church of Rome). Now,...
7
votes
1answer
143 views

Latin in the European Parliament

I vaguely remember that once the following happened in the European Parliament: One member of the parliament delivered a speech in Latin, and afterwards another member stood up and answered the speech ...

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