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1answer
62 views

“Facilis descensus averno” or “descensus averno facilis est”?

I have always seen "facilis descencus averno" as the translation for "the descent to hell is easy", but I saw it written as "descensus averno facilis est" and I'm in doubt now. Which one is correct?
2
votes
0answers
31 views

Translating EMS quotes

I need some assistance. I'm attempting to translate some EMS quotes. Some come from local sources (like bracelets, tshirts, and patches.) Google translate and crowdsourcing has, as of yet, been ...
2
votes
0answers
46 views

Learning from scratch

I am interested in learning Latin. I have tried to find good resources to do this online but have found a great deal of noise. Does anyone have any good recommendations of how to properly learn Latin ...
6
votes
4answers
447 views

Is there a diminutive form for agent nouns?

I recently read a joke about the use of Latin -tor and -trix nouns in modern English. The punchline was that "trix is for kids". This got me wondering: Is there a way to make diminutives from agent ...
1
vote
1answer
113 views

What is the word for “now” in Classical Latin?

I found that the translation for the word "now" is "nunc." Is it correct that in the Latin language that there only exists capital letters and that the letter "U" is "V"? If so, would it be correct ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Trying to make a corny comeback in latin, also happen to be clueless in latin

One of my friends always has this status that goes "Per aspera ad abyssum" a variant of "Per aspera ad astra", though noticably more cynical and pessimistic. I thought of "Through difficulties to ...
11
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5answers
5k views

Learn Ancient Greek or Latin first?

I am in the beginning stages of thinking about learning both Ancient Greek and Latin. During my initial research, I have encountered some people saying that learning Latin first is what is commonly ...
2
votes
3answers
87 views

Help with translation “I choose”

I am looking to get a small tattoo with the phrase "I choose" or "I choose to" which will mean different things to me eg; I choose to be happy, I choose to forgive, etc. I would like it in Latin so ...
5
votes
1answer
135 views

What is the longest sequence of ablative/dative nouns ever to appear in Latin texts

I was intrigued by my question to ask this question. In that questions we have a sequence of 2 ablative nouns in a row: "[Dama] differt a capreis [solis] cornibus ..." I don't count solis because ...
5
votes
1answer
168 views

How to say: “X differs from Y by(in) Z”

I want to say something of this sort: The word "res" differs from the word "rex" by one letter. In "Lexicon totius Latinitatis" I saw under the term "dama": "[Dama] differt a capreis solis ...
5
votes
3answers
149 views

Fake family motto from English to Latin

Apologies, but could anyone translate the following to Latin, in the style of a family motto? "God loves those whom the fiend pursues" I tried Google translate, but, judging by the reverse ...
1
vote
2answers
101 views

How did 'apo-' shift from signifying 'off, away' to 'because of'?

What notions underlie 'off, away' and 'because of'? ἀπό - Wiktionary Etymology From Proto-Indo-European *h₂epó (“off, away”). Preposition ᾰ̓πό • (apó) (governs the genitive) ...
6
votes
2answers
215 views

middle voice in Latin

Does the sequence esse plus past participle (of a non-deponent Verb) occure in middle function in latin? Is the middle function restricted to the mediopassive r-form in the imperfective tenses (...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

What are some of the major words that we use in English directly (unmodified) from Latin?

I am looking through the Wiki page on Latin words used in English, but they mostly consist of words like "lux" and "terra", words that are sort of used in English, but really have that Latin feel to ...
0
votes
1answer
44 views

What's the latin translation of “proceeding in disregard of”

If I in a philosophical paper want to say for example that "It is foolish continue the discourse x without taking the relevant science y into account", is there an adequate latin phrase for "...
2
votes
2answers
91 views

What's the latin translation of “ We must know, we will know ”

I'm attempting to find a latin translation for the contrasting meaning of ignoramus et ignorabimus - We do not know and will not know i.e, We must know, we will know
1
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0answers
71 views

When God Softens The Heart

Q: How do you say "open your mind"in latin? (it's for a tattoo) was never resolved. A literal translation of "open your mind" would not work; therefore, some lateral thinking. From ...
3
votes
2answers
261 views

How do you latinize the name “Cole”?

Salvete, I can't figure out how I would go about latinizing my name. I would also appreciate a declension of my latinized name. I was thinking that maybe "Colus," "Colis," or "Coleus" could work, ...
0
votes
1answer
34 views

Translate “from fiction, truth” into Latin

I would like to translate the following into Latin: "From fiction, truth" The semantic suggestion is that truth is manufactured from fiction.
3
votes
1answer
104 views

How do I translate “Eternal light guide me”?

Am a guy, planning to get this tattooed and coming from a Latin-illiterate background (never studied Latin in my life). Context: to remind me of God's guidance throughout my life and to continue to ...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

How did 'folding' semantically shift to mean 'reply'?

I seek more details and other opinions than Cerberus's answer that cited Lewis & Short on what notions underlie folding and replying. As to why folding (back) came to mean uttering (back), I ...
0
votes
1answer
54 views

How would learning Latin only to read Latin change the way I should learn it?

So I studied GCSE Latin but there was no English to Latin on the Exam, we only ever had to read in Latin or translate from Latin into English. So my question is this: If I wanted to learn to read and ...
3
votes
1answer
91 views

Partitive genitive in Spinoza

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 15, Scholium: Sane rerum quae realiter ab invicem distinctae sunt, una sine alia esse et in suo statu manere potest Is rerum partitive genitive and is it ...
0
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2answers
133 views

How to say “living a purposeful life” in Latin?

In Google it translates to "propositum animam viventem", but the translation itself goes different when it's translated back to English. I wonder what is the accurate translation for this phrase. ...
4
votes
2answers
141 views

Using Participles in Latin Tenses

In English, we can communicate progressiveness of an action by combining a form of "to be" with a participle. For instance, "I am acting" is progressive, whereas "I act" is not. I am wondering about ...
2
votes
0answers
62 views

Latin in Popular Music

Several German bands (Helium Vola, Qntal, Estampie) sing in Latin (and often in other "dead" languages like Old French and Middle High German)*. Is this a phenomenon unique to Germany, or are there ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Looking for Personal Lexicon / Dictionary Program

I'm trying to find a personal lexicon/dictionary/language study/flash card program - preferably one that makes allowances (ie has a place to enter) all of the forms of a word (noun declensions, verb ...
3
votes
2answers
114 views

Infinitival impersonal passives

The impersonal passive is a familiar construction: Pugnatur. "There is fighting / people are fighting / etc." Pugnatum est. "There was fighting / etc." Here a finite passive verb is being used ...
1
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0answers
46 views

Translating “win against all odds”

Does the phrase "non obstante omnes, vinco" have a coherent meaning? I wanted it to mean something like "in spite it all (or) against all odds, win/conquer!". I want to get this phrase engraved in ...
6
votes
1answer
213 views

Is 'volo' ever used with a future infinitive?

One can certainly use volo with an infinitive to express a wish: Volo amari! I want to be loved! A future sense is often implied, as one would probably interpret that I'm not loved now if I wish ...
3
votes
1answer
162 views

The usage of present passive infinitive

In Augustine confessions we read: "quid tibi sum ipse, ut amari te iubeas a me et, nisi faciam, irascaris mihi et mineris ingentes miserias?" (book I, cap. V) I can't understand the usage of the ...
6
votes
1answer
217 views

Trouble transcribing a line of Latin from Codex Claromontanus

I am trying to transcribe Hebrews 6 from Codex Claromontanus, but am unable to decipher two lines from verse 1: Source: https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b84683111/f907.item (see halfway down the ...
4
votes
1answer
79 views

Maxima - a speech competition?

At some point in childhood I learnt there were speech competitions in ancient Rome when people would express complex ideas in very few words. And I believed since those short sentences called "maxima" ...
7
votes
0answers
80 views

Which name came first, Lucius or Λουκᾶς?

The etymology of the name Luke is commonly said to be the Latin name Lucas, itself from Lucius, from the praenomen Lucius, from the root Lux (gen. Lucis). [A separate etymology says Λουκᾶς/Λουκανός, ...
2
votes
2answers
180 views

How do you say “open your mind”in latin? (it's for a tattoo)

Can anyone please translate "Open your mind."? I need an accurate translation for a tattoo and I'm not that good at latin since I just started learning it. Open your mind should be translated ...
4
votes
1answer
105 views

How does one express adjectives in the present tense in Latin which aren't everlasting?

Exempli gratia, how would one say 'I am perturbed' in Latin opposed to 'I am human'? The state of being perturbed can change, but the state of being a human being cannot change, so how does one write ...
4
votes
1answer
87 views

difference between Impleo (+acc) and Impleo (+abl)

I found two instances in Augustine's Confessions: "... caelum et terram ego impleo" (book 1, cap. 2) and: "et quo refundis quidquid impleto caelo et terra restat ex te?" (book 1, cap. 3) I ...
2
votes
2answers
113 views

Zombie version of “Homo homini lupus est”

According to wikipedia "Homō hominī lupus est" is a Latin proverb meaning "A man is a wolf to another man." Say, I want to apply "zombie transformation" to this proverb, which would make it "A zombie ...
2
votes
1answer
54 views

Online text of the Officium Parvum

What version do you have of the Little Office of the Blessed Virgin Mary (Officium Parvum Beatae Mariae Virginis)? I have the one posted on Play Books but it has some errors. Can you show me where the ...
1
vote
1answer
40 views

How would I translate “Lead the way” or “Pathfinder”, “Leadership”

This is for a tattoo, so I want the meaning to be accurate. My friend who passed was an Aiborne Ranger and they had the motto of "Lead the Way" as they were the first into battle. It will be next to "...
13
votes
6answers
5k views

How to correctly say Star Wars in Latin?

I know that the nouns are stella and bellum, but I think the translation should in spirit be closer to stellar wars or something similar.
1
vote
1answer
42 views

What do “inexquisitum” and “supramemorati” mean?

In a medieval document I am reading the words "inexquisitum" and "supramemorati" appear. I do not know these words, can not find them on Google and they are not in my dictionary. Does anyone know what ...
4
votes
1answer
73 views

Help with a medieval Latin sentence

I am trying to translate a sentence in medieval Latin (see below). It comes from a document that concernes an estate that is given to a monastery. Below you can see the relevant excerpt, I bolded the ...
8
votes
2answers
103 views

Why vowel lengthening in Greek compounds?

In Greek compounds, when the second member of the compounds begins with a short vowel, this vowel is often lengthened: στρατ-ηγός < ἄγω ἀν-ώνυμος < ὄνομα ἡμι-ώβολον < ὀβολός What is ...
7
votes
2answers
112 views

What is the etymology of “chorāgus”?

Lewis and Short indicates that "chorāgus" is from Greek χορηγός (Doric χορᾱγός), which LSJ says is a compound of χορός and ἡγέομαι. The entries for choragus in the Oxford English Dictionary and a ...
4
votes
1answer
42 views

What is the etymology of Laches? (The Ancient Greek name.)

I'm studying Plato, but am ungreeked. Does the Ancient Greek name Laches have a known or suspected etymology? My searches have only turned up the modern legal term, related to the Latin word laxo. ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Did “sanctifico” ever mean “to make the sign of the cross”?

The Spanish word "santiguar" means "to make the sign of the cross". So for instance, when a Catholic enters a church, s/he "se santigua" (s/he makes the sign of the cross on her/himself). According ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

How did the preposition “de” evolve into meaning “from”?

I see that in reconstructed PIE "de" or "do" has a meaning of "towards" which is retained in Germanic "to" and Slavic "do". But in Latin "de" has a meaning of "from". Is that simply due it taking the ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Should one use the singular or plural when the number is unknown?

It just occurred to me (I'm that guy maybe starting the YouTube channel) that I don't know whether to use the singular or plural to address my audience in Latin. My thinking goes like this: plural ...
3
votes
1answer
112 views

Where does this plural come from?

I am translating a medieval Latin text about the donation of a monastery. In the text there is this sentence: Idcirco noverit omnium fidelium sanctae dei ecclesiae nostrumque praesentium scilicet ...

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