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2
votes
1answer
39 views

Latin sentences from 1683 epitaph

What does this mean? "Plantarunt vivi divino lumine coelos. Coelos nunc habitant. Ossa favilla fovet." It's from a 1683 epitaph for two Danish priests.
3
votes
1answer
28 views

Understanding a sacrifice in Horace's carmen 1.5

In Carmina 1, poem 5, Horace writes about an untrustworthy and seducing lady. He ends the poem in: (...) Me tabula sacer votiva paries indicat uvida suspendisse potenti vestimenta maris deo. ...
4
votes
1answer
269 views

“Never/do not forget, always remember” in Latin

I've looked around some forums and the translation I've got so far is: Ne Obliviscaris, Semper Commemoras I'm still not sure if this is correct. The context of the phrase that I wish to get the ...
2
votes
2answers
61 views

What is a “sockpuppet”?

Inspired by a recent meta question, which I had to write in English for lack of appropriate Latin vocabulary: A "sockpuppet", on the internet, is an alternate identity someone creates for nefarious ...
3
votes
1answer
22 views

Proper way to say “Traveler's Writ/Licence/Certificate”

I am looking for more or less the 'proper' (or any good approximation) way to translate a "Traveler's Writ," as in a certificate or license given to a traveler that allows him legal access to an area. ...
3
votes
1answer
33 views

The meaning of 'belgicare' in Notker Balbulus

What is the meaning of the obscure verb belgicare or belgico? Background Notker Balbulus of St. Gall (c. 840 to 912) writes this verb in a letter/epistle to a certain Lantbert, wherein Notker ...
4
votes
1answer
164 views

Why “amatus est” instead of “*amavitur”

Is there any diachronic reason whereby synthetic perfective passive forms like *amavitur (and similar ones) are not possible and analytic forms like amatus est (and similar ones) are selected instead? ...
2
votes
2answers
80 views

Pro paganos civitate est civitate dei

I want to say 'the City of God is established by the existence of (aggresive) pagans. What would be the grammatical and elegant (in the style of St. Augustine) way of saying this in Latin? I am ...
4
votes
0answers
74 views

How many vowel qualities did Oscan have?

Oscan was an Italic language related to Latin, which died out somewhere in the early centuries CE. It's notable for being used in the Fabulae Atellanae and for being the source of various loans into ...
2
votes
1answer
110 views

Does Latin “pingo” relate to “pix”? [closed]

Does Latin "pingo" to paint relate to "pix" tar by analogy with "pango" to agree and "pax" peace?
3
votes
1answer
44 views

Can I submit a manuscript with 'submittere'?

As a scientist, I frequently find myself submitting a manuscript to a journal for peer review and hopefully publication. What would be a good Latin verb for this sense of "submit"? It could also be a ...
3
votes
0answers
67 views

What is known about the feminine natural gender for trees in classical Latin?

It is a well known fact of Latin grammar, that trees follow natural gender and are always feminine, even when the word form would suggest masculine gender, as in populus "poplar". What does motivate ...
3
votes
2answers
314 views

Does “aurea” have the second meaning?

Does "aurea" have the second meaning? http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/morph?l=aurea&la=la#lexicon aurea doesn't mean "the bridle of a horse" in the following context in my opinion: "...
4
votes
1answer
110 views

The instances where verbs might take the genitive case

In Sixto-Clementine Vulgate we find in Genesis this verse: poenituit eum quod hominum fecisset in terra (Genesis 6:6) "hominum" is in the genetive case which I find strange. I try searching for ...
1
vote
0answers
46 views

I need help translating two sentences into Latin [closed]

Phrase 1 : Life is in the doing. Phrase 2 : The wood belongs to the families who have their roots in it.
1
vote
1answer
36 views

Where can I get a reliable list of words with macrons on?

When people are adding macrons to text, how do they know where the macrons should be? Is there a list somewhere? e.g. insula -> īnsula or īnsulā maxima -> maxima or māxima etc. I'd like to ...
3
votes
1answer
31 views

What is the translation for: “for those I love I will sacrifice”

How can I translate "for those I love I will sacrifice" to Latin? I got several different answers from different sources: prō meīs nihil nōn patiar prō dīlēctīs nihil nōn patiar Iillis quos amo ...
4
votes
1answer
57 views

In ancient Attic Greek, how (un)stable were “ΝΣ”/“ΝΖ” and preceding vowels?

In Latin, it is thought (as far as I know) that within a single word, /ns/ and /nf/ were always preceded by a long vowel. This is a somewhat complicated result of a hypothesized sound change in words ...
5
votes
2answers
114 views

Is this an actual quote from Euripides?

There's a passage I've seen quoted in several books on self-help and spiritualism: Look what the goddess does when she is sad: she takes up a tambourine, made of taut skin and rimmed with castanets ...
0
votes
3answers
49 views

Could Atlas Ad Astra mean “A collection of maps to the stars”?

If Ad Astra means to the stars, and Atlas means a collection of maps, would Atlas Ad Astra convey the meaning that a collection of map? If not, what is the grammatical way of saying it?
2
votes
0answers
32 views

Are there specific exceptions to the rule of lengthening a vowel before “ns” or “nf”?

A while ago, I wrote an answer summarizing my understanding of the rule that a vowel is long in Classical Latin before ns or nf. As far as I know, this rule applied very regularly. But I'm not sure ...
4
votes
0answers
55 views

Do we have evidence of clipped words in Latin?

In English, it's common for words to be clipped down to their first couple syllables: "brother" becomes "bro", "university" becomes "uni", "doctor" becomes "doc", "veteran" becomes "vet", and so on. ...
3
votes
2answers
72 views

nuance of difference in etymology of “intend” and “attend”

I am trying to tease out the etymological difference between "intend" and "attend." Both "in" or "en" as a Latin prefix and "ad" translate as "toward". So the etymological sense of both words is "to ...
4
votes
2answers
84 views

Can one create a diminutive of a truncated form of “frater”?

In Spanish we have the word mano for hermano ("brother"), and that form can give the diminutive manito, when the brother is very small (less than one). In Latin, like in Italian, it might be possible ...
7
votes
1answer
639 views

Translating 'Liber'

I'm new to Latin (in the first semester), and recently found myself tripped up when reading a text from another student in my class, which was: ille liber mihi nunc bonum est Whether it was lack ...
3
votes
1answer
40 views

First use of capital letters

The first standard latin script which consisted of both majuscule and minuscule letters (lowercase and uppercase, or small and capital letters) in one word is Carolingian minuscule. It is a fact. But ...
11
votes
2answers
289 views

Etymology of 'calcit(r)are'?

While interested in the etymology of 'recalcitrant', most sources, namely OED, M-W, etymonline) give something like the following: 1823, from French récalcitrant, literally "kicking back" (17c.-...
2
votes
1answer
72 views

“eandem esse rationem totius et partium”?

In galileo's dialog of two chief world systems he reffer to an axiom "eandem esse rationem totius et partium" I can't quite make out what that means, and nor can i find the axiom anywhere else, ...
1
vote
2answers
47 views

Translation: that which was to have been made

I still remember quod erat demonstrandum, but ...that which was to have been made (actually generated)? How would I best say that? I am thinking quod erat factum, but am unsure.
-2
votes
0answers
45 views

Classical Pronunciation IPA Resources

Is anyone able to link me to a IPA vowel chart for classical Latin? Also, any other useful IPA resources for learning classical pronunciation of Latin that could be recommended is most appreciated.
10
votes
1answer
108 views

Do any Latin authors mention other Italic languages?

By the power of modern linguistics, quite a lot is known about the early history of Latin: for quite a while it coexisted with close relatives like Oscan, Umbrian, and Faliscan, as well as the ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

What is the correct translation for “The story is not over”?

What is the correct translation for "The story is not over"? "Story" here refers to the metaphorical story of our lives (so rather fabula than historia). "Not over" means that's not completed and that ...
1
vote
2answers
48 views

Genitive with assigno

In Ethics, De Dei, Proposition 11, Second demonstration we read: Cujuscunque rei assignari debet causa seu ratio tam cur existit quam cur non existit cujuscunque rei is genitive, but ...
5
votes
2answers
236 views

Is EUM the only possible translation for HIM as direct object?

In an exam a teacher has put the following example to fill in the gap: Amici Rufi ____ noscebant. According to the docent, if the right word has been selected, the translation in English should be:...
1
vote
1answer
78 views

What is the original, most earliest meaning of 'Nostrum'?

I found the following definition of "nostrum" online: A secret elixir, ingredients being secret and only known by the Maker, and it is a cure-all to mankind. I want to discover the true meaning of ...
4
votes
1answer
985 views

Socratic Paradox

According to the Wikipedia page of the Socratic paradox 'I know that I know nothing', Latin version of the same is — 'Scio me nescire' (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/I_know_that_I_know_nothing). ...
3
votes
1answer
146 views

Grammar of “Nec huic publico, ut opinantur, malo turba tantum et imprudens uulgus ingemuit”

I'm a novice trying to learn Latin, and I hope this question is appropriate to this forum (please let me know if it is not the case). I tried to read this section from De Brevitate Vitae (text here):...
4
votes
1answer
35 views

Grammatical analysis of comparative parts (i.e. “tam … quam”, etc.)

I have the following sentence from Seneca, epistula 1, §2: "Cum placuerit fieri, toto illum pectore admitte; tam audaciter cum illo loquere quam tecum." However, I'm not sure what the "tam audaciter ...
4
votes
2answers
101 views

Translation of “Do it for her”

Could someone help me translate "Do it for her" into Latin? Context: The "it" refers to keep working, fighting, striving, while "her" actually refers to two persons; sometimes individually (so I'd ...
2
votes
1answer
55 views

Did the Romans make bilingual puns?

I know that the Romans appreciated wordplay. But there's a rare and specific type of pun that I'm curious about now: a pun based on words sounding similar between languages. For example: Have you ...
3
votes
2answers
126 views

Subjunctive mood in comparison

In Spinoza's Ethics we see: nihil in natura clarius quam quod unumquodque ens sub aliquo attributo debeat concipi I know meaning of the sentence. My question is about debeat. Why is this verb ...
1
vote
1answer
55 views

looking for a pair of texts in a Greek/Latin comedy

I'm looking for any pair of texts (Ancient Greek, Latin), meeting the following criteria: Both texts may be very brief. The Latin text should be a translation very close to the Greek text. The Greek ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

What is the Tinctura Physica?

This question quotes an alchemical text by Sendivogius, which mentions the Tinctura Physica as equivalent to the Lapis Philosophorum, i.e. the Philosopher's Stone. But what exactly was the Tinctura ...
3
votes
2answers
145 views

Can you please help me understand passages from an alchemical text?

I am reading Novuum Lumen Chemicum with the help of Waite’s English translation. (https://www.sacred-texts.com/alc/hm2/hm204.htm) The following passage I cannot understand clearly. It seems that Waite ...
4
votes
1answer
61 views

What should we call the space beyond the world?

To the Romans, if I understand right, the word caelum "sky" incorporated everything above the earth: the atmosphere, the space beyond it, and even the thrones of the gods. But nowadays we divide ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

Nominativus cum infinitivo

Can somebody please tell me if my translation for the sentence: "It seems that the slave is carrying a letter." is correct? Videtur servus epistulam portare. videtur - 3rd person present passive ...
3
votes
2answers
51 views

How do I translate “Putting many ducks into space”?

I'm trying to find how to say "Putting many ducks into space" in the most proper way, but I have very little experience in Latin and so the different forms of words are somewhat confusing to me. What ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Imposing Conditions On The Conditional

North & Hillard p.157: Footnote (1): "Moreover in Impossible Conditions, if the verb of the apodosis is possum, debeo, oportet, or a gerundive (or any verb expressing obligation or possibility), ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Why is the phrase “horror vacui” commonly interpreted as “nature abhors a vacuum”?

Why is the Latin phrase: horror vacui commonly interpreted as: nature abhors a vacuum? It may well be Aristotle's intended message, given the context, but it seems like a bit of a jump. Doesn't it? ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

“Etiam si omnes” and “Et si omnes”

Is there a semantic difference between "Etiam si omnes, ego non" and "Et si omnes ego non"? I know Latin is loose when it comes to word order, and it seems to me the answer is no, but the way this ...

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