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8 views

Why is the root vowels of 'salsus' and 'saliō' from 'sāl' shortened?

Working my way through the Duolingo course, I noticed that salsus has a short root vowel, even though sāl, sālis¹ is long-voweled. The etymology entry on Wiktionary states that the adjective is from ...
4
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2answers
24 views

Why is Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum in the feminine?

I often consult a website called Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum of Latin writings on music theory and practice. Note that the web address changes every couple of years. Why "musicarum latinarum&...
4
votes
1answer
132 views

βυκάνη < būcina: vowel reduction undone in borrowings from Latin?

So I've come across this word βῡκάνη, ostensibly borrowed from Latin būcina ('an ox-horn trumpet'), from bou- ('ox') + canere ('to sing'). The lack of vowel reduction is immediately striking; ...
2
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0answers
21 views

Is there a general method for creating an adjective from a noun?

In a comment on an answer to making an adjective from a noun, Joonas mentions that this is not a trivial matter and gives a solution to making an adjective out of chicken for an approximate ...
9
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2answers
631 views

Translate “I listened to… and all I got was this t-shirt” into Latin

I have a musical project I've been working on called Instruments of Ruin (it's instrumental, so the name is a play on that). I want to make shirts for it that have the phrase, "I listened to ...
5
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2answers
67 views

Does “Ob Eam Causam” introduce an indirect question

I apologize if there's an obvious answer here I'm missing, but I can't figure out why this line from De Bello Gallico 5.33 is subjunctive: "At Cotta, qui cogitasset haec posse in itinere accidere ...
2
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1answer
38 views

Verb + dative/ablative-supine

According to A&G, the ablative supine with verbs is "extremely rare" and even the example given: pudet dictu is somewhat not regular since pudet is impersonal (as if it is almost an ...
8
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1answer
1k views

How do you say “I am vaccinated” in Latin?

How do you say that you have been vaccinated in Latin? I'm not sure how to construct this tense, and I'm not familiar with a modern Latin verb for "vaccinate".
3
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0answers
32 views

Why is tonos (sometimes) rendered different from oxia?

Now cross-posted to Graphic Design SE, as per the discussion in chat. In the question ‘What is the difference between the accent on q and the accent on semicolon?’, Joonas Ilmavirta suggested I ask a ...
5
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3answers
553 views

Adapting Cato's motto for today

I need some help with the grammar here, I'm interested in learning Latin so I have been lurking around here for a bit, but I haven't really started, yet. (Well, I have had a couple of false starts). I ...
7
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1answer
131 views

Can -que be used with negation?

If I want to negate two things, can I combine them with -que? For example, if I want to say "I don't have a cat or a dog", can I say non habeo felem canemque? Or should it rather be non ...
7
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1answer
305 views

Is the constellation named Lupus a male wolf? or could it be female?

Unlike most constellations, Lupus isn't named after a specific character in mythology. It used to be a dog or beast, but eventually it was given the Latin name Lupus. I'm not really sure how gender ...
3
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1answer
78 views

What are two lines from the Bee-Gee's song, “Don't Forget to Remember Me”, in Latin?

The chorus in the Bee-Gees' haunting song, "Don't Forget to Remember Me" (1969), includes: "Don't forget to remember me, And a love that used to be" THE FIRST LINE To translate ...
6
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2answers
717 views

What is the best translation of the phrase `plebs together strong`?

I think the phrase plebs together strong is a cool one in English, but I'd like to translate it to Latin. In this context, I take pleb to mean a commoner, an ordinary person and the essence of the ...
8
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2answers
379 views

What is the connection between stipula (stalk) and stipulari (to extract a promise)?

How did the meaning of stipulari (to extract a promise) develop from stipula (a stalk), if indeed it did?
10
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3answers
2k views

Did the Romans have a word for “genius”?

I am looking for a Latin word corresponding to the common modern English sense of the word "genius", a person with extraordinary ability in a specific field. I do not want to refer to the ...
6
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0answers
63 views

Grammatical terminology

Do you know the book that describes the origin of grammatical terms, gives their definition, explains why they are called the way they are etc. (e. g. what is "conjugation", why do we call ...
4
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1answer
93 views

What is the Latin word for “polymath”?

I wonder what Latin word or expression best describes a polymath, someone who masters several subjects. The two solutions I thought of are the following but I find them unsatisfactory. polymathēs, -...
8
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2answers
702 views

How do you say “under an angel's wing” in Latin?

How do you say "under an angel's wing" in Latin? Should it be sub ala angelus or sub ala angeli? A friend of mine has a tattoo (using the 1st option), and she's afraid it's not correct.
6
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0answers
62 views

How was the Concept of Price-Wage Inflation Expressed in the Roman World?

Inflation bedevils capitalist economies. Despite the power of Rome, the low-wage slave-economy, and a single currency (quite an achievement), the Roman World suffered from inflation. This happened ...
4
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1answer
63 views

Star age of exploration translation

A while ago I asked about a translation for "star age" to ancient Greek. I ended up with the wording: Astereaon. I am now curious as to what the translation would be for something like: &...
11
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1answer
1k views

How did the Romans congratulate a new father?

One of our users recently became a father and of course congratulations are in order. How did the Romans do that? More specifically, are there any attested congratulations to a new father in the ...
5
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1answer
606 views

What is the percentage of loan words in Classical Latin?

I want to know the percentages of loanwords in Classical Latin (maybe including Old Latin but NOT post-classical Latin), including native terms and words, for example: 90% Native 7% Greek 1% Etruscan ?...
5
votes
1answer
260 views

Adverbial intensifier

Populi! I try to find a word in Latin which couriers this specific sense: right, just, the very; and still found nothing. I mean that I can find it in many another languages: right here, just behind, ...
5
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1answer
124 views

How to say “bad batch” in Latin?

Suppose one of the four batches of amphorae produced yesterday at my pottery is discovered to be deficient and has to be thrown away instead of being sold. What should I call such a "bad batch&...
4
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2answers
674 views

How to say “next star” in Latin?

What would be some ways to say "next star", "the next star" or something very similar in Latin? By next I mean next as in "the next star to visit/conquer/study", not &...
3
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2answers
218 views

Does anyone know what the New Latin adaption of iens (family to eo) was?

I am guessing jens since j was the most common heading alphabet for replacing i as a first letter. Addendum for clarity: One of New Latin's nominations was the adjustment to spelling of certain words, ...
8
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1answer
264 views

Differences between cano and canto

In Cap. X of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces the verb cano, having introduced canto in a previous chapter. The usage of both so far is just sing, but are there more nuanced differences between the two? From ...
8
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1answer
688 views

How do I say “Don't forget to forgive” in Latin?

I would like say in latin "Don't forget to forgive". It would be like a declarative/recommendation statement.
9
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1answer
1k views

How to say “black market” in Latin?

How does one say "black market" in Latin? According to the OED, this word first originated in English in 1727.
5
votes
1answer
153 views

How do you say “anything is possible” in Latin?

If you wanted to say that anything is possible in Latin, how would you do it? One possibility I thought of was something like: Omne posse I'm not sure that omne quite captures the nuance of anything ...
8
votes
1answer
144 views

Usage of quidquid: “dominetur piscibus aquatilibus … et quidquid in terra movetur”

In Gen. 1:26 by Sebastian Castellio: ita fatur: Faciamus hominem ad imaginem nostram, nostri similem, qui dominetur piscibus aquatilibus, volucribus aereis, pecudibus, denique toti terrae, et ...
7
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1answer
339 views

Is Greek ἀρά, prayer, cognate with Latin ara, altar?

Is Greek ἀρά, prayer, cognate with Latin ara, altar? Wiktionary had ἀράομαι, with the etymology pointing to a red-linked ἀρά. I created an entry for ἀρά based on LSJ, but I have no source of ...
5
votes
1answer
143 views

The verb 'utor' in gerundive constructions

I was wondering about the logic of the usage of the verb utor in gerundive constructions. The following relevant quote is from Woodcock's (1959: 164) A New Latin Syntax: "one can say ad hanc rem ...
14
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2answers
1k views

What would an election campaign be called in Latin?

Our site has its first election now and the voting period starts in 12 hours. Therefore it is a good moment to figure out some of the election vocabulary in Latin. What would be a good Latin word for ...
9
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2answers
392 views

Why subjunctive mood in this sentence from a Vatican document?

In this recent question we looked at the following sentence from the apostolic constitution Provida Mater Ecclesia: § 2. Instituta, salvis communibus iuris canonici normis quae ipsa respiciant, ...
5
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3answers
493 views

Is “Ut facerem sed retro oblitus” idiomatic for “I was going to, but then I got distracted and forgot”?

I translated "I would have done it, but turned and forgot" via google translate, hoping that phrasing would be end up with a more idiomatic latin phrase. Otherwise, how do I convey the ...
4
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1answer
119 views

What does “Prout necessitas ferat atque experientia suffragetur” translate to in English?

What would this latin sentence mean : "Prout necessitas ferat atque experientia suffragetur" ? No idea... Note: found in this link
3
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1answer
65 views

What is “A man only does something that sits easily with his conscience.” translated into Latin?

The infamous and long-discredited legal defence: "I was only obeying orders.", has become almost the traditional excuse for cowardice & brutality. Of the legal (There is a higher moral ...
5
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0answers
77 views

Is “Te id dicente id non fit.” good Latin for “You saying so does not make it so.”?

Is "Te id dicente id non fit." good Latin for "You saying so does not make it so."? There are a couple of things I am not sure about it. When the participle is in ablative ("...
5
votes
1answer
415 views

Understanding the sentence “Cum avis volat, alae moventur” from LLPSI

In Cap. X of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces these three sentences: Cum avis volat, alae moventur. Cum homo ambulat, pedes moventur. Cum piscis natat, cauda movetur. While I understand the general meaning ...
6
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1answer
352 views

In Matthew 27, why does the Vulgate call the graves of people who were resurrected along with Jesus “monumentum”, but Jesus's grave “sepulchrum”?

In Matthew 27, why does the Vulgate call the graves of people who were resurrected along with Jesus "monumentum", but Jesus's grave "sepulchrum"? Matthew 27:53 says, in Vulgate: ...
7
votes
1answer
207 views

Tellus' “briny robes”

I read in Keats' Hyperion: [...] No, by Tellus and her briny robes! (Hyperion, 246) Tellus is a Latin goddess, her Greek counterpart being Gaia. I am looking for the Greek or Latin source of the ...
15
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1answer
384 views

Is there any rule for determining whether a verb beginning with ε- will augment to η- vs ει-, or must all verbs' behaviors be memorized?

For instance, the verb ἐλευθερῶ augments to ἠλευθέρουν in the past, whereas the verb ἔχω augments to εἶχον (not ἦχον as might have been predicted).
5
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1answer
174 views

Latin justification for the English word tradent

I was reading the following thread https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/tradent.3819293/ - There it is stated that the English word tradent, according to the OED means Chiefly in Rabbinic Jewish ...
5
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3answers
471 views

How to say “in a certain respect” in Latin?

How does one say the adverbial phrase "in a certain respect" or "in certain respects" in Latin? For example, would whatever under a certain condition is such-and-such, is such-and-...
7
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1answer
433 views

Translate “I will cast my shadow” into Latin

I want to translate I will cast my shadow into Latin. This phrase is inspired from a poem by Horace, that has the line: Pulvis et Umbra Sumus My interpretation of this is that we are simply our ...
5
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1answer
149 views

Homeric hapax legomenon ἐγγεινομαι — is it not real?

There is a 2018 thesis by Alexandra Kozak, "Le Dictionnaire des hapax dans la poésie grecque archaïque, d'Homère à Eschyle," freely downloadable from https://tel.archives-ouvertes.fr/tel-...
11
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1answer
504 views

In Vulgate Lk 22: 62, “Et egressus foras Petrus flevit amare.”, it says. How to understand “flevit amare”?

I know "flevit" means "wept" and "amare" means "to love", but the Greek text is "ἔκλαυσεν πικρῶς", which means "wept bitterly". If I parse ...
5
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1answer
128 views

recordor + genitive?

In the Vulgate, Gen 8:1, we have Recordatus autem Deus Noë, cunctorumque animantium, et omnium jumentorum, quæ erant cum eo in arca, adduxit spiritum super terram, et immunitæ sunt aquæ. I would ...

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