All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
1 vote
1 answer
16 views

If a Latin sentence cannot end in a preposition, how would you say "I have never seen that before." in Latin?

If a Latin sentence cannot end in a preposition, how would you say "I have never seen that before." in Latin? Would you say something along the lines of "Numquam illud vidi ante hoc ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
-3 votes
0 answers
22 views

Does verus (true) etymologically derive from viridis / vireo (green / to be green)? [closed]

Does verus (true) etymologically derive from viridis / vireo (green / to be green)? See my previous question "Are vir and virgo etymologically related?", in which St. Isidore shows that ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,682
-2 votes
1 answer
19 views

What English words derrive from "quaerere"?

What contemporary English words derive from "quaerere"? It might help to know that querer is one of the more popular Spanish words for the English desire. If it helps, then also consider the ...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
66 views

Use of the perfect to indicate "whenever I do someting"

In the following sentence I do understand the reason the perfect is used for veni: rure meo possum quidvis perferre patique; ad mare cum veni, generosum et lene requiro ("In my country estate I ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 6,991
2 votes
0 answers
33 views

Deciphering a banderole in Master Francke's "Nativity"

What is the text coming from Mary's mouth in this altarpiece by Master Francke? According to one source I found, the text says Dominus meus, Deus meus (my Lord, my God). But the third word in the ...
Doubt's user avatar
  • 417
0 votes
0 answers
26 views

Translation for tattoo Zach Bryan [closed]

I am really wanting my first tattoo, my wife has been opposed to all but one idea. The tattoo would be a quote on my arm above the sleeve line. I want to translate the English phase (from Zach Bryan) “...
Bobby Hunter's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
404 views

Having a hard time finding classical examples of eo (the verb)

I am having a hard time finding examples of the word eo (to go). For example, I searched Perseus for both it and isse in multiple plays of Plautus like Pseudolus, Menaechmi, Miles Gloriosus, and a lot ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 6,991
-1 votes
0 answers
47 views

What the titles for reputable academic journals that were published in latin between the years 1500 and 1900?

I want to use a computer system to find sentences in old academic journals, of good repute, that contain the word ludi, or words related to ludi. SentenceNumber ExampleSentence EnglishSentence 1 Mi ...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
18 views

What is the expanded form of "éd. augm."? [migrated]

What is the uncontracted form of éd. augm.? Consider the following snippet of text: « Ludis » (par C. du Cange, 1678), dans du Cange, et al., Glossarium mediae et infimae latinitatis, éd. augm., ...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
87 views

Exsistitne in lingua Latina verbum pro die post cras?

Ut didici cum rogavi meum praeviosum rogatum in hac agora, lingua Latina habet verbum pro die ante heri: nudiustertius. Sed nescio, habetne ea etiam verbum pro die post cras? Lingua Croatica habet id ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
540 views

Estne in lingua Latina verbum pro die ante heri?

Estne in lingua Latina verbum pro die ante heri? Scitis, ut Croaticum verbum "prekjučer" (quod legitur "trans-heri"). SUMMARY: Did Latin have a word for the day before yesterday?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
-2 votes
0 answers
43 views

Translating help for gift for Latin teacher [closed]

I would like to give our daughters’ Latin teacher a gift and have it engraved in Latin and want to be certain that it is correct. How would you translate this sentence in Latin? - You will always be ...
Kelli Hardman's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
54 views

What is the translation of a drop-in desk in Latin?

A drop-in desk is: a workspace that is set up to handle unscheduled visits by workers who don’t have a long-term desk in the facility, but need one for that day. What is the translation of a drop-in ...
Arunabh Bhattacharya's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
23 views

How do you say "table editor" (a software name) in Latin?

I want to know how to say "table editor" (a software) in Latin. I have searched that "table" is "mensa" or "tabula" in Latin on Wiktionary but it doesn't ...
Paalon's user avatar
  • 1
0 votes
1 answer
62 views

What is "Book of the Black Sacrament" in Medieval Latin?

What would the Medieval Latin translation be for the title "Book of the Black Sacrament"? (Note: black here means dark or evil, not the actual colour.) Thanks.
Anonymous's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
712 views

On the case of "patientia nostra" in Cicero

Very straightforward. I don't know any dictionary of latin regencies, so I come here whenever these questions rise up. In the famous quote: Quousque tandem abutere, Catilina, patientia nostra? we have ...
hellofriends's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
111 views

Does "iugiter" have any descendants in English?

Does the Latin term iugiter (or jugiter) have any descendants in English, even remote ones? It is morphologically similar to judge, but the two don't seem to have any etymological relationship.
Doubt's user avatar
  • 417
3 votes
0 answers
121 views

Sentence without a verb

After finishing Haury's Latin translation of The Little Prince, namely Regulus, I found another Latin version by Alexander Winkler. In Chapter 1, I noticed this sentence (in boldface): Semper vero ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
28 views

How do you say "forever" in Latin? [duplicate]

I am trying to translate the lyrics of the Eric Bogle's song "The Green Fields of France" into Latin. In the second stanza, we have: Or are you a stranger without a name, enclosed forever ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
92 views

How to obtain the stem of a comparative adjective?

Learn to Read Latin says on p276 in Section 109. Comparison of Adjectives and Adverbs: Comparative Degree of Adjectives All regular first-second and third-declension adjectives in Latin form the ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1,167
2 votes
1 answer
158 views

Is -is the feminine singular nominative endings of third-declension adjectives with three or two nominative singular forms?

Learn to Read Latin says on p151 in Section 74 Third-Declension Adjectives: To find the stem of third-declension adjectives with three or two nominative singular forms, take the feminine singular ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1,167
1 vote
0 answers
57 views

from dēfēcisse to deficisse

My question concerns the forms dēfēcisse (dēficio, active infinitive perfect) and the variant dēficisse. I found both forms in a text from Justin/Trogus (Epitome.11.2.7) : In cuius apparatu occupato ...
suizokukan's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

Usage of "prorsus ut" (idiom?)

I don't quite understand the following clause from the Historia Augusta: ...prorsus ut autem patrem militibus praeberet ("so he showed himself to be much like a father to his troops") ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
  • 6,991
1 vote
1 answer
120 views

Was Greek ever written in this way at any time in antiquity?

Are there any extant ancient Greek inscriptions that exhibit all of the following features: scriptio continua (i.e., majuscules letters only, no spaces between words, no diacritics, no punctuation ...
Noah J's user avatar
  • 113
2 votes
0 answers
43 views

Patristic philology - editions of byzantine texts

We are aware of the editions of classical texts (ancient Greek and Latin) by Oxford, Teubner, Bude, Loeb. Where should I search for byzantine texts and especially works of Greek Orthodox Holy Fathers (...
SK_'s user avatar
  • 147
1 vote
1 answer
67 views

Translating a motto (you can't always please everyone, but you can always save money)

I'm just looking for some feedback and advice in translating a whimsical family motto: you can't always please everyone, but you can always save money. The literal translation isn't very punchy: ...
adam.baker's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
400 views

What does "quod" refer to in Vulgate in Matthew 26:75?

In Vulgate: Et recordatus est Petrus verbi Jesu, quod dixerat : Priusquam gallus cantet, ter me negabis. Et egressus foras, flevit amare. https://www.bible.com/bible/823/MAT.26.75 What does "...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
52 views

In "Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles", why is it "per totam insulam" and not "totam per insulam" or "per insulam totam"?

Tris dies per totam insulam matrem quaerebat; tandem quarto die ad templum Dianae pervenit. http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/ritchie.html Why is it "per totam insulam", and not "per ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
161 views

What does "Tris dies" mean in "Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles"?

From Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles: Tris dies per totam insulam matrem quaerebat; tandem quarto die ad templum Dianae pervenit. http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/ritchie.html What does "Tris dies"...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
196 views

"hōc enim ūnō modō...scelus" or "hoc enim ūnō modō...scelus" ? (Ritchie's Fabulae faciles, §20)

I read in Ritchie's Fabulae faciles ([Hercules, §20], macrons are mine): Vbi Herculēs fīnem fēcit, Pȳthia prīmō tacēbat; tandem tamen iussit eum ad urbem Tīryntha īre et Eurysthēī rēgis omnia ...
suizokukan's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
241 views

What does "labore" mean in this passage of Hugh of Saint Victor?

To be precise, I'm aware labore is generally translated as work, but I'd like to know if it's to be understood as physical work, intellectual work or any kind of work in the following passage of Hugh ...
Useless's user avatar
  • 63
5 votes
1 answer
117 views

In Vulgate in Matthew 26:29, is "bibam" present subjunctive or future indicative?

In Vulgate: Dico autem vobis : non bibam amodo de hoc genimine vitis usque in diem illum, cum illud bibam vobiscum novum in regno Patris mei. https://www.bible.com/bible/823/MAT.26.29 So, is "...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
652 views

English pronunciation of Ancient Greek names

Are there any rules for converting Ancient Greek names into an English (borrowed) pronunciation? I'm imagining an algorithm of Ancient Greek letters → English IPA that would work in 90% or 80% of ...
Simon Branch's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
166 views

How to distinguish between "X is Y" and "Y is X"?

triggered by a question on how to render "The past is a thought", the naive pattern as suggested in the question is "X Y est"; In English that gives us insight on the nature of the ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.1k
3 votes
0 answers
58 views

What is the Latin translation of ‘The past is a thought’?

I tried Google translate and got praeteritum est cogitatio A friend who studied Latin 30 years ago said correct to the above or praeteritum memoria est However, he wasn’t sure if memoria should ...
Stefano 's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
89 views

Help with inscription

The following is part of an inscription in the wine cellar of a private residence in Tuscany which dates back to 1573. The rest of the inscription is in Latin and easily translated but would like to ...
Berks103's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
89 views

How do you say "dry river/watercourse" in Latin?

Is there a specific/right term to refer to this Mediterranean natural entity, i.e. a place where a stream runs sporadically?
ephesinus's user avatar
  • 565
5 votes
1 answer
283 views

Can facio be used to express visiting someone?

In Duolingo's Latin course, they have examples like the following: Cliens patronum facit. The answer they expect you to choose is, "the client visits the patron". Can facio be used to mean ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,592
3 votes
1 answer
346 views

Is there any potential ambiguity in this phrase from Xenophon?

I'm (still) reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I came across this sentence: οἱ μὲν οὖν πρῶτοι ὅμως τρόπῳ τινὶ ἐστρατοπεδεύσαντο, οἱ δὲ ὕστεροι σκοταῖοι προσιόντες ὡς ἐτύγχανον ἕκαστοι ηὐλίζοντο, καὶ ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,051
9 votes
1 answer
623 views

One Syllabus Many Syllabontes?

Trask's Historical Linguistics (3rd Edition) makes an off-hand comment that "the Greek word syllabus has a Greek plural syllabontes". As we know syllabus is actually a spurious word, arising ...
Tristan's user avatar
  • 645
7 votes
1 answer
930 views

Precise pronunciation of b, d and g

I'm a native speaker of Catalan and Spanish, so for me it is way more natural to pronounce b, d and g as [β], [ð] and [ɣ] between vowels, instead of as [b], [d] and [g]. For example, is nobis ...
Agente 156's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
266 views

How would you say "He says he used to remember that." in Latin?

"He says he remembers that." would be, if I am not mistaken, "Is dicit se illius meminisse.". But how would you say "He says he used to remember that."?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
10 votes
0 answers
87 views

When does a Latin relative pronoun get "attracted" into the case of its antecedent?

Generally, a relative pronoun agrees with its antecedent in gender and number, while its case is determined by its grammatical function in the relative clause, e.g. Do pecuniam filio [dat.] quem [acc....
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.5k
11 votes
3 answers
705 views

Latin minimal pairs, distinguished only by the length of the vowel in an unstressed non-last syllable

I'm thinking about which diacritics to use in Latin to give pronunciation hints without writing the length of all the vowels (which I find very noisy). My main aim is to avoid homographs that are not ...
Anserin's user avatar
  • 422
1 vote
2 answers
141 views

Very new learner looking for feed back

I am brand new to the Latin language but have been wanting to start learning for some time. As a first project for myself I’ve attempted to translate my family motto from English to Latin the best I ...
Mister Gables's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
113 views

«Dream and believe» in Latin

I want to get a tattoo in Latin. I already have one but for another, my knowledge is not enough to translate correctly. The text I want is: “Dream and believe” Just to clarify, the phrase does not ...
Vaasinaa's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
1k views

Latin translation of "no slavery beyond death"

How would you say (or express the sentiment of) "no slavery beyond (as in 'after)' death" in Latin? Thanks!
Keho Kreivi's user avatar
-1 votes
0 answers
89 views

Needing to know correct Latin variant

Need to know the correct Latin variant for the following words to put on a mental health themed coin. Wanting to put: Body. Mind. Community. Spirit. Currently have: Corpus. Mens. Civitas. Spiritus. ...
Jordan Bates's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
111 views

Which vowel lengths and stressed syllables are marked in the Vatican Lexicon?

I noticed that the following are marked in the Parvum verborum novatorum léxicum: the (ante)penultimate vowel when it is long by nature (ovorum intrīta), the antepenultimate syllable when it is ...
Anserin's user avatar
  • 422
2 votes
1 answer
113 views

How to correct say: "Gaius de deo" or "Gaius de dei" or "Gaius de deus"?

I wanna say "Gaius from god" in Latin. That means God create Gaius or God send Gaius out. How to correct say: "Gaius de deo" or "Gaius de dei" or "Gaius de deus"...
Fakt309's user avatar
  • 121

15 30 50 per page
1
2 3 4 5
132