All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3
votes
0answers
25 views

Did “quartilis” exist?

In statistics, a point that separates out (a multiple of) 25% of the data set is called a "quartile". Similarly, if it separates out 20% of the data, it's a "quintile", 1% a "percentile", and in ...
3
votes
4answers
325 views

Disambiguation of “nobis vobis” and “nobis nobis”

For many words, the dative and ablative take the same form. Two examples are nos and vos (nobis and vobis, respectively). Imagine you want to say something like "from us to you [plural]" (where "...
3
votes
0answers
33 views

Do imperatives trigger reflexive pronouns in Latin?

In English, imperative verbs have "invisible subjects": syntactically, they act like there's an invisible pronoun in the subject position. This is why we see look closely at yourself instead of *look ...
3
votes
2answers
58 views

Translation to Latin: “Forward engineering”

I am looking for a new name for my engineering company. I want to translate the English phrase 'Forward engineering' into Latin language.
5
votes
0answers
47 views

How did “what” become “because”?

Two of the most common words for "because" in Latin are quod and quia, both of which began as neuter forms of quī "who". (At some point quia got replaced with the feminine plural quae, though I don't ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

Imperial Chariot Racing

In the made-for-TV re-make of "Ben Hur", Hugh Bonneville played Pontius Pilate. At one point "Pilate" said: "Chariot-racing is not a sport for amateurs. And to compete and to lose would be worse than ...
8
votes
3answers
2k views

Are there nouns that change meaning based on gender?

I was looking through a feature in some Romance languages, Spanish and French, where nouns in Spanish change depending on gender. I was wondering if Latin had a few of these. Here are examples in ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

What is a “click” in Greek or Latin?

Linguistically, "clicks" are a type of sound found in certain African languages, mostly Khoisan and Southern Bantu. The English word is also used for various other sharp, high-pitched noises (like ...
3
votes
0answers
44 views

An unambiguous example of 'īt'

The regular perfect them form for "he went" is iit. In an answer to this question about two short versus one long vowel, TKR mentions that this form can be contracted to īt. In a text without macrons ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

Did the Romans ever use 'decimatio' in a generalized sense?

Decimātiō was a Roman term for a military punishment where a group was reduced by a tenth. But in modern English, decimation is used generically to mean 'greatly reduced or damaged', often in ...
4
votes
1answer
91 views

What is the evidence for a long vowel in χριστός “anointed” and Latin Christus?

The Greek word χριστός, used as a translation of Hebrew משיח "messiah", and meaning something like "anointed" (Liddell and Scott), apparently has a long vowel in the first syllable. The quantity of ...
5
votes
2answers
101 views

What is the correct etymology of ignōscō “pardon”?

The verb ignōscō, with the meaning "pardon, forgive", is explained in some sources as coming from the negative prefix in- and (g)nōscō. For example, Lewis and Short says "lit., not to wish to know, ...
7
votes
4answers
2k views

Can 'in-' mean both 'in' and 'no'?

The prefix in- can mean "in" or "into" or similar, as in inire. It can also mean "non-" or "un-", as in infelix. Both meanings of the prefix are attested, but I am not familiar with any case where ...
2
votes
1answer
51 views

How is the word “Eboracum” stressed in Latin?

John Walker in his work A Key to the Classical Pronunciation of Greek, Latin, and Scripture Proper Names suggests pronouncing it as "Ebóracum": Are there any other sources of this word's ...
6
votes
1answer
50 views

Why do numbered months in the ancient Roman calendar have different suffixes?

Wikipedia and other sites detail the (possibly legendary) ancient Roman "Calendar of Romulus": I'm curious about the suffixes to the "numbered" months, the fifth through tenth. The names of the ...
-4
votes
0answers
65 views

What semantic notions underlie haemophilia and 'A constitutional (usually hereditary) tendency to bleeding'?

Is this auto-antonymy? I'm guessing this, as humans who love blood undeniably wouldn't want to lose it, let alone so effortlessly! I'd reckon that hemophiliac bodies DON'T love blood! If not, which ...
4
votes
0answers
43 views

Opposing meanings of the suffix -gena

I recently came across the word "deigena" while reading c. 2, lectio 4 of Aquinas's Commentary on the Divine Names of [Pseudo-]Dionysius. This led me to discover what seems to be a productive suffix ...
4
votes
1answer
123 views

μονάδαι as plural form of μονάς

In the text that I am reading now, the Greek word μονάδαι is used to indicate "units". I have understood it as a plural form of μονάς, however, I could only find μονᾰ́δε in the dual form and μονᾰ́δες ...
3
votes
2answers
149 views

Not fallen in Latin

Would "Non Lapsus" be a good way of writing "Not Fallen" in Latin? (Lapsus chosen because it refers to the Biblical Fall of Man)
3
votes
3answers
86 views

What should we call a laptop?

This question arose the other day in our chat room: What is a laptop in Latin? There are several possible ways to approach this. It feels most reasonable to me to take a word for "computer" and ...
5
votes
2answers
291 views

What evidence points to a long ō in the first syllable of nōscō's present-tense form?

I've read in various sources that the verb nosco 'know' had a long vowel in the first syllable in Classical Latin pronunciation: nōscō [noːskoː]. I'm wondering what the linguistic evidence is for the ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

Which word best translates spark as in a spark of energy?

Any latin, my tags aren't a mistake. The more variations the better thanks
3
votes
1answer
56 views

What is the relationship between “cut off” and “X-coordinate”?

Etymonline claims that abscissa originally meant 'cut off', but what's 'cut off' about an x-coordinate? X-coordinates are merely numbers, not lines. How did a word for 'cut off' come to be used for x-...
5
votes
1answer
121 views

Does an ig- prefix mean there's an underlying g in the root?

There seem to be certain words in Latin which start with an underlying /gn/, such as noscō /gnosko:/ [nɔsko:]—this "hidden" /g/ appears when prefixes are added, as in cognoscō /congnosko:/ [cɔŋnɔsko:] ...
3
votes
1answer
69 views

Latin for a “control knob”

What is an appropriate Latin word for a knob that controls something else, such as a volume control knob, a light dimmer, the tuning control on a radio, the temperature control knob on a space heater, ...
2
votes
1answer
56 views

On the etymology of Greek ἄελλα, and the mysterious Hesychius gloss for αυεουλλαι

I see on Wiktionary that ἄελλα is related to ἄημι, which comes from the PIE root *h₂weh₁-, meaning "to blow". This explains ἄε, but not the rest. Prompted by the weird Alcaeus word αυεουλλαι glossed ...
6
votes
1answer
56 views

Superlatives In Subordinate Clauses

North & Hillard Ex. 198 begins: "It was already dawning when the general gave the signal, promising a great reward to the first man who climbed the walls." The translation: "iam illucescebat cum ...
0
votes
1answer
67 views

Has 'com-' been a causative prefix?

constitute {verb}     Etymology : [..] con- intensive + statuĕre to set up, place: [...] 6. To make (a person or thing) something; to establish or set up as. (With obj. and compl.) Cf. 2. 8....
1
vote
1answer
75 views

Ablative of Specification or Dative of Reference

Spinoza, Ethics, De Dei, Propositio 15, Scholium: Ego saltem satis clare meo quidem judicio demonstravi ... meo judicio is dative or ablative? I cant recognize that it is Ablative of ...
2
votes
1answer
42 views

What are the conventions for transcribing Semitic languages into Latin?

(Inspired by this question) Latin definitely had contact with Semitic languages over the course of its existence, most notably Punic. When words and names from these languages were transcribed into ...
5
votes
1answer
103 views

Opposite for desideratum to mean “something not wished for”

Desideratum means "something that is desired", and quite often is used in philosophy to refer to the subject of a philosophical investigation. (Wiktionary, Merriam-Webster) I want another word, ...
0
votes
0answers
40 views

Be oneself among others

I stumbled upon a two word motto a while ago that translated more or less as the tile above, I believe it started with the word “Simul”. Does this ring any bells with anyone?
7
votes
1answer
239 views

What are the conventions for transcribing Semitic languages into Greek?

The surviving Koine Greek corpus contains quite a lot of transcribed Semitic words, borrowed from Hebrew, Aramaic, and maybe others. (For example, the LXX is full of Hebrew names.) Were there ...
3
votes
1answer
106 views

How to say “Third time lucky” in Latin

Answering a recent question, I've realized that I don't know how to say the following idiomatic expression in Latin (cf. Spanish: "A la tercera va la vencida"). Any suggestions? "Third time lucky" ...
3
votes
3answers
94 views

Why is largest number in Roman Numerals not represented as “MMMIM”?

according to wikipedia, the largest number Roman Numeral system can represent is represented like following: (answer below has much bigger number represented) MMMCMXCIX why can't it be represented ...
8
votes
2answers
736 views

How to say “fit” in Latin?

The English word "fit" has a number of different uses, and that makes searching difficult. I am looking for a verb or phrase to be used in a sentence like this: The souvenir does not fit in my bag. ...
2
votes
1answer
73 views

What evidence is there for volēre over volere?

In this answer, fdb mentions the Classical verb volō, velle transforming into *voleō, volēre in Vulgar Latin. The main evidence for this is a form volendi in Augustine and reflexes like voglio, volere ...
4
votes
1answer
64 views

Where does the word “tudes” 'hammer' show up in texts?

Lewis and Short has an entry for a noun tŭdes, with the genitive singular given as "is (ĭtis, acc. to Fest. p. 253 Müll.)". It is defined as "a hammer, mallet". The two citations in the entry show the ...
4
votes
2answers
794 views

Was there ever a difference between 'volo' and 'volo'?

The words "I want" and "I fly" are both volō. Was there ever any difference in pronunciation in the classical era or later? I expect such differences to be more likely in vulgar Latin. The rest ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Latin expression for “carrying something on one's back”

In Spanish, the word cuesta is nowadays used as slope. Nonetheless, the etymology of the word indicates that it comes fom Latin costa, ae meaning "a side" but also "a rib". In fact, an old meaning for ...
4
votes
1answer
53 views

Using perfect participle as perfect active participle

Is perfect participle, in spite of the general notion, used both as perfect passive participle and perfect active participle? Spinoza, Ethics, De Dei, Propositio 15, Scholium: nam omnes qui ...
3
votes
1answer
69 views

Is “Stanford populi” bad Latin?

In their "Open Loop University" concept vision, Stanford introduces "populi" as the next conceptual step after "alumni". Examples of usage follow. "...we now have a populi of 215,000 ongoing students....
6
votes
0answers
72 views

Is there any database on idiomatic expressions in Latin?

It is often said that one has an excellent command of a language when one is able to use it in an idiomatic way, which typically involves making use of Idioms and Collocations, i.a. There are many ...
3
votes
2answers
76 views

Two by four meters in size

If I want to describe the dimensions of my office, I might say that it is about two by four meters. How do I phrase this size, "two by four meters", in Latin? I don't just want to say that the area ...
5
votes
0answers
89 views

Translation into Koine (perhaps Testament?) Greek

Could someone translate the following into Koine Greek (or Testament Greek, if there were juicy differences.) We won’t tell Helen why we could leave her at the beach without company. The older ...
2
votes
0answers
34 views

auscultare < aus - clutare

A question was asked on French stackexchange about ausculter as a medical term and when it started being used in that sense. The meaning seems to go back to the early 19th century and Laennec, the ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

How to start learning Latin?

I am a newbie to this language so I don't know where to start. I am ready to take a lot of effort and would really like to know how to master this language. How can I get started with learning Latin?
0
votes
0answers
31 views

How doesn't katholikos connote any boundary or inclusivity or exclusivity?

I don't understand the bolded phrase from HuffPost beneath. How isn't the notion of “throughout-the-whole” identical to 'universal''s 'certain sense of inclusivity' that 'necessarily implies exclusion'...
3
votes
2answers
101 views

How does drawing circles with a compass explain the etymology of 'universe'?

I don't understand the imagery in the quote below that I bolded: The centerpiece of his research is the etymology or origin of the word “catholic.” While we do commonly use it to mean “universal,” ...
5
votes
4answers
262 views

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a “middle voice”?

In Ancient Greek, verbs often take a "middle voice", neither active nor passive. The forms usually look identical to the passive on the surface, but can take direct objects and cannot take an agent (...

15 30 50 per page