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19 views

Dative of Reference: (D of R)

North & Hillard Ex. 204; Q1: the following is to be translated into Latin: "If he had not mocked me, I should perhaps have forgiven him." (Impossible conditions: past tense: pluperfect subjunctive ...
3
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3answers
33 views

Latin phrase for “at the moment” or “immediate”, temporal equivalent for in situ?

I know phrases like "in situ" which means in the current place/position, is there another phrase for the temporal equivalent which means "at the moment"?
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0answers
47 views

Can gender be kept from Latin to a descend language? Are there patterns for this?

I read this in a random forum: "Words neuter in Latin become masculine in Spanish" (For instance "vāsum" = el vaso) Could it be some patterns making predictable the gender from Latin to a descend ...
6
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1answer
173 views

Difference between αὐτός and οὗτος

In the sentence οὗτος λέγει ὅτι αὕτη τὸ βιβλίον γράφει translated by "He says that she is writing the book." would the meaning change if οὗτος was substituted by αὐτός thus forming the sentence αὐτός ...
6
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3answers
79 views

Why plural “laudantium” with singular “militiae”?

In the Latin Vulgate, Luke 2:13 is translated: Et subito facta est cum angelo multitudo militiæ cælestis laudantium Deum, et dicentium ... "And suddenly there was with the angel a multitude of ...
3
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1answer
45 views

How to translate this medieval sentence

I am trying to translate the following sentence: Si liberalitatis nostrae munere de beneficiis a deo nobis conlatis locis ecclesiasticis quiddam conferimus, id nobis procul dubio as aeternae ...
2
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1answer
54 views

How would you translate this sentence?

I am currently working on a translation passage adapted from Livy 43.4 by Ashley Carter, titled Hortensius at Abdera, but got stuck only a few lines into it. Here is the sentence that I am struggling ...
0
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0answers
35 views

Negotia Essentialia and Essentialia Negotii

As Per Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials. Did the Classical Roman Scholars in Roman Law use Essentialia Negotii? Wouldn't it be more gramatical to use Negotia Essentialia to refer to ...
4
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0answers
38 views

How to translate “by means of utterance”?

If I in a philosophy paper wish to say that a statement renders itself meaningless/contradictory "in utterance" or "by means of utterance" (i.e. upon being uttered), is there a way to do this? ...
5
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1answer
49 views

Can the title “Pie Pellicane, Iesu Domine” be shortened?

I have a question regarding the Pelican Piety allegory. Is it accurate to inscribe it this way: IESU PIE PELLICANE For lack of space on artistic scroll work, is this accurate?
2
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1answer
233 views

Do Crashing Vowels Disqualify Words?

In Q: "Contra felicem vix deus vires habet" - Need advice on replacing the word "Felicem"; suggested that "felicem" be replced by "audacem". Thanks to Hugh who indicated the ...
8
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2answers
1k views

When can “qui” mean “how”?

From brianpck's comment on another answer: "qui" quite often means "how" in Plautus This took me by surprise, since I'd never seen that use before. In what contexts can quī mean "how"? And where ...
4
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2answers
56 views

May I request a translation for “Tacita decisio controversiæ quam præcedendi desiderium pepererat in adventu.”?

I am translating a biography of Alessandro Farnese from French into English. The original source occasionally quotes a Latin phrase here and there. Most of them are known proverbs but this one comes ...
1
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1answer
41 views

Is “mobile (vulgus)” used to refer to a “mob”?

According to Wiktionary, the English term "mob" (as in group of people) comes from the Middle English "mobile", which comes from the Latin "mobile (vulgus)" (a moving crowd). Is this meaning attested ...
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1answer
53 views

How to translate: “If anyone asks what you are now learning tell them they are unworthy?”

I am curious about the best way to translate this sentence into Latin: "If anyone asks what you are now learning tell them they are unworthy" Thanks in advance! -Sue
1
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1answer
53 views

How do you translate 'preferring man' into Latin as 'wise man' is translated into Homo sapiens?

My initial try was “Homo Praeferens”. What I mean by 'preferring man' is that we can always find the most favorite from a set of alternatives, which is the finding from my behavioral study. I think it ...
8
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3answers
2k views

Are there any surviving Ancient Greek letters (epistolary)?

I was wondering how the Greeks in the archaic or classical age wrote letters, if there was some sort of convention for them, thus I searched for Ancient Greek letters but found nothing. Is somebody ...
3
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1answer
80 views

Why “ sibi ” in “ sibi conscius”?

Originally " conscius" meant " knowing something with someone, sharing the knowledge of something with someone". ( Ref : Gaffiot Dictionnaire Latin Français). This may explain why a pronoun ( "sibi")...
3
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2answers
99 views

How do I say “I own myself” in Latin?

I am trying to grasp the difference between "I" and "myself" in Latin. How would the phrase "I own myself" translate to Latin?
3
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1answer
54 views

On the origin of the name “culture” ( possible confusion between “cultura” and “cultus”)

The context of my question is a philosophical reflection on the concept of culture in the anthropological sense. The anthrological concept of "culture" dates from Tylor: culture is “that complex ...
4
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1answer
47 views

Grammar and Meaning in Context SUMMIS

I have a choral text set to music by Anton Bruckner. (I do not know Bruckner's source.) The text VIRGA JESSE reads as follows: VIRGA JESSE FLORUIT VIRGO DEUM ET HOMINEM GENUIT PACEM DEUS ...
6
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1answer
135 views

Grammar and Meaning in Context of EIUS

I have a question regarding the translation of the Gregorian chant OS JUSTI, which Wikipedia claims to be used as gradual of the Commune Doctorum, and as introit I and gradual II of the Commune ...
9
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3answers
863 views

Dropping “to be” and other verbs in Latin?

Some languages, like Indonesian, can drop the verb to be when the meaning is obvious. They are zero-copula languages. I heard that some Latin authors wrote some sentences with this feature. Do you ...
3
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0answers
47 views

'War is hell' in Latin

Some ideas I have come up with are:- bellum est infandum war is an abomination inmite est bellum war is pitiless res cruenta et infanda est Mars War is a blood-soaked atrocity Mars furit infandus War ...
2
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1answer
44 views

Ethics of Spinoza - Question about Translation

Spinoza, Ethics, De Dei, Propositio 15, Scholium: Si igitur ipsi ex suo hoc absurdo concludere tamen volunt substantiam extensam debere esse finitam, nihil aliud hercle faciunt quam si quis ex eo ...
3
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0answers
45 views

Climate Change--Revised

Firstly, thanks to brianpck, Joonas, cnread & Quidam for their intervention and many helpful suggestions on the restructuring of this Q. Climate change (CC)/ Global Warming (GW)--phrases that ...
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0answers
30 views

A good source for macrons et apices?

I try to learn Latin vocabulary with macrons. But online dictionaries, either don't give the diacritic, or give them only for the nominative, have some errors, or give only macrons, and no apices. ...
1
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4answers
94 views

Translation of “Too many people have opinions on things they know nothing about. And the more ignorant they are, the more opinions they have.”

Can anyone provide an accurate translation for this quote? I would try to do it myself, but my Latin knowledge is limited as I am still learning.
6
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0answers
65 views

What is the difference between “lux” and “lumen”?

Latin has two common words for "light": lux and lumen. What are the differences between these two words? Are there any contexts in which one would be appropriate while the other would not? It would ...
5
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1answer
76 views

“By the power of dark light, I shall rise.” What is the accurate way to say this in Latin?

I am looking for an accurate way to say the following phrase in Latin. “By the power of dark light, I shall rise.” Since context matters for an accurate as possible translation, I give said context ...
2
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2answers
103 views

“Contra felicem vix deus vires habet” - Need advice on replacing the word “Felicem”

For context, this is for a tattoo I'd like to get but I want to make sure it's syntactically correct as best as possible. I think the phrase is a great one, however I would very much prefer it to be ...
4
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1answer
113 views

Should I learn the four conjugations?

So I did well in my Latin GCSE this year but we just learned that -o is first person, -s is second person, etc. But I had a closer look at the textbook today and it lists verbs in four conjugations ...
5
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1answer
40 views

Origin of Auspicium Melioris Aevi

Auspicium Melioris Aevi, commonly translated to “Augur/Omen/Hope of a Better Age” serves as the motto of the Order of Saint Michael and Saint George. Does it have any ancient origin? Or is it's ...
6
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1answer
84 views

Is “The beginning is half of every action” truly a Greek proverb?

I found in a book from 2015 a box with the quote: The beginning is half of every action. (Greek proverb) I googled it and there are many "pop websites" with the same quote. But none with a ...
5
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3answers
4k views

Translation of “Love makes it grow” in Latin for my tattoo

Thank you very much for all your replies. However the answers do not exactly match the meaning. "Love makes [anything] grow." -- This anything can be anything - a person, work, condition, anything ...
4
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0answers
52 views

Why does “urgueo” exist as a variant of “urgeo”?

The rule I learned for the pronunciation of the digram "gu" before a vowel in Latin was /gw/ after "n", vs. g + vocalic u anywhere else. But I just discovered the exception urgueo /urgweoː/. This is a ...
0
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0answers
40 views

How were vowels u and i discerned from consonants v and j?

If in original texts there were no means of distinguishing whether u and i were consonants or vowels, how then do we now know which ones were which? The easy ruleset I learned in high school is that ...
5
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2answers
87 views

How to ask “how much time does it take?” in Latin

This question suggested the verb consumere to represent time spent/taken. I wonder what would be the appropriate way to ask "how long does something take?". For some reason "quot/quotus/quam tempus ...
3
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0answers
49 views

What was the difference in the concept of “colour” in Latin and modern languages?

For this question: Are there Latin words for hair color?, I had to search a little about the concept of "color" in Latin. I also had a debate on another SE, with people who consider that "color" is ...
2
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1answer
51 views

Is the word χιραϲ used in the Codex Sinaiticus as a proper noun to mean Hira or as another part of speech to mean hands?

Codex Sinaiticus gives the following rendition of Isa. 29:12: και δοθηϲεται το βιβλιον τουτο ειϲ χιραϲ ανθρωπου · μη επιϲταμενου γραμʼματα ˙ και ερι αυτω · αναγνωθι ταυτα και ερι . ουκ αιπιϲταμαι ...
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0answers
52 views

What is “appactim”?

The asker of another question cited a passage from a Hebrew-Latin lexicon: At הֲלוֹם, arab. هَلُمَّ particula, huc, usque huc. pr. appactim. Another edition of the book seems to confirm this ...
4
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1answer
3k views

Does this Latin book state that the meaning of the Arabic word ةلم is huc?

Does this Latin book (p.471) state that the meaning of the Arabic word ةلم is 'huc'? I'm asking it because it doesn't understood to me if it's the meaning or maybe the book just gives the ...
0
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2answers
58 views

What's the literal translation for a genitive of value?

Quanti... constat? Quanti... constant? "Quanti" is called a "genitive of value". (By the way, I don't understand why it's not a "genitive of price", as we ask for a price here.) -What would be the ...
6
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2answers
181 views

What did “quid pro quo” originally mean?

The phrase quid pro quo means "what for what" in Latin, but that makes very little sense to me. Wikipedia hints at the original meaning having to do with substitutions. That makes sense, as pro can ...
1
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0answers
23 views

Is there a tool/website to see which non-Latin words are derived from a given Latin word?

One way I use to learn Latin vocabulary is to seek for derived Spanish/English words which meaning I know. For instance, gressus derived into egresar and ingresar, Spanish words which mean to exit ("e[...
5
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1answer
82 views

Seneca’s Epistula Moralis XLI: “God” or “a god”?

The Loeb translation by Richard M. Gummere of Seneca's Epistula XLI, "On the God Within Us": Non sunt ad caelum elevandae manus nec exorandus aedituus ut nos ad aurem simulacri, quasi magis ...
5
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1answer
92 views

Appropinquare: difference in the meaning according to the case?

Is there a difference in the meaning, between "appropinquare" + dative, and "appropinquare" + ad + accusative? Dictionaries are not very clear about it. https://outils.biblissima.fr/fr/collatinus-...
2
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1answer
60 views

What is the difference between is, ille, and hic when they mean “he”?

I already know about the distance, but this is a difference in the meaning when they are demonstrative. What would be the difference in connotations, and their use, when they are "he". I can find ...
5
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2answers
240 views

Advenit versus Venit

In Cap. VII of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces Advenit with the following sentence Ecce Iulius ad villam advenit. It's curious to me that the verb includes the preposition; why not just use venit alone ...
1
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1answer
107 views

Why was 'haemophilia' created to mean 'A constitutional (usually hereditary) tendency to bleeding'? [closed]

Is this auto-antonymy? I'm guessing so, as humans who love blood undeniably wouldn't want to lose it! If not, which type of semantic shift according to Blank's 1999 typology? OED and haemophilia - ...

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