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2
votes
1answer
45 views

Latin for Choose

How would you write the following: “Choose gentleness/kindness” Or even just “choose”, or “make a choice”, said as a directive? Or to say “You have a choice” “One has a choice”? My thought behind this ...
5
votes
1answer
241 views

Are these short translations correct?

Hello you wonderful people, Could you please help me checking if these sentences mean what I think? Memento vitae - Remember Life Memento amorem - Remember Love Memento aeternitas - Remember Eternity ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Latin translation of “hope for the best, prepare for the worst”

I'm looking in translating this text (in classical Latin rather than contemporary): Hope for the best Prepare for the worst Expect the unexpected (or alternatively "Plan for the worst") ...
3
votes
1answer
108 views

Why do Latin editions not use macrons today?

There have been many macron questions, but not this as far as I can see. Dickey's Learn Latin from the Romans (2018), pp. 5--6, notes that "Latin texts are usually printed without macrons". ...
3
votes
1answer
102 views

About the Latin translation of Avicenna

I have a problem in the Latin translation of Avicenna's Metaphysics, that is Liber de philosophia prima sive scientia divina. Tractatus IX, Capitulum VII, p. 510, line 67-70: Huiusmodi autem res ...
1
vote
1answer
77 views

Is “Attero Denarios” correct for “I destroy coins”?

I am writing a series and looking for a title particularly in Latin. Got the idea from Sabaton's 'Attero Dominatus' and have read that thread. 'Attero Denarios', seems be correct for 'I destroy coins' ...
2
votes
1answer
93 views

Translating a sentence with “virisque”

'Res Romana stat moribus antiquis virisque' Please, help me to translate it, especially I have trouble understanding the grammar in the second part, virisque is from vir – 'man', so why here is ...
5
votes
1answer
185 views

Set of texts of increasing difficulty

I am looking for resources to progress in Latin reading. In particular, I would like a set of texts (for example short stories or fables) whose difficulty increases as you go along.
4
votes
1answer
67 views

Future Imperative of Deponents: 3 or 4 existing forms?

For most verbs there are 4 future imperative forms, right? Here an example: But now I did research on deponents and found following table: Now my question is if there are really only 3 forms of the ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Present participle with future tense verb(s)

Can someone please help me with the bolded sections. 1) How to translate present participle with a future verbs? 2) How to translate that ablative absolute? Nullus enim homo, si modo rationis compos ...
2
votes
3answers
136 views

How do I say 'There is always a reason for a drink'?

in Dutch we say 'er is altijd een reden voor een borrel', which I want engraved on a whisky glass for my friend. How do you say 'There is always a reason for a drink' in Latin? On the internet, I find ...
1
vote
0answers
34 views

What is a latin stem for swap?

I don't know if I asked this question correctly, but what is a latin stem for swap? I don't specifically need it to be just swap. You can answer my question by saying a latin stm for switch, or ...
4
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0answers
60 views

Most accurate translation for 'ok' in Latin

In English we say the abbreviation 'ok' for 'oll korrect', what would the abbreviation be in Latin?
4
votes
2answers
106 views

Would the meaning change a bit if I changed “mea culpa” to “culpa mea” even if Latin doesn't care about word order?

At a Catholic Mass (Roman rite) people sometimes say (either in vernacular or Latin): "Confiteor Deo omnipotenti, et vobis fratres, quia peccavi nimis cogitatione, verbo, opere et omissione: mea ...
3
votes
1answer
36 views

Does Latin only require on “mea”/“my” when English Requires two?

I just heard the motto "Patria gloria mea" in a movie. It was translated as "my country, my honor". MY questions: Does Latin only require one "mea"/"my" when ...
4
votes
3answers
133 views

Deriving verbs from nouns: iota > iotare

What is the natural way in which to derive verbs from nouns, where their meaning is to furnish something with the thing named by the noun? For example, what might one call an omega furnished with an ...
6
votes
1answer
287 views

What does the phrase “horae subsecivae” mean in the title of a work by philosopher Christian Wolff?

Christian Wolff was a German philosopher in the 18th century who wrote many works in Latin. As part of his work, he wrote a set of three volumes all called Horae subsecivae Marburgenses (Marburg is a ...
1
vote
0answers
39 views

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness?

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness? I’m looking for words that were used before the common era (before 0 CE). I’m looking for words from Latin, Greek, German, and other languages. These ...
1
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0answers
56 views

Tennyson quote in Latin

I need help translating a Tennyson line Be loyal to the royal in thyself and be loyal to the land
4
votes
1answer
71 views

Please translate into English: “Stultorum infinita esse genera”

This copper engraving is from a 1628 Italian book. Link to image of page: http://diglib.hab.de/drucke/uk-70/start.htm
2
votes
1answer
87 views

Is “ut” or “est” in the following sentence necessary?

This is probably a basic question but I am looking for a little help translating "death to bad memories". I come up with either; mors ut malum memorias or Mors est malis memorias. My own ...
10
votes
1answer
525 views

Verbum Hispānicum “mientras” significat “-m” fīnāle prōnūntiātum esse?

In Was the final “-m” a “full-featured” consonant?, cēnsēbant "-m" fīnāle prōnūntiātum nōn esse, sed faciēbat nāsāle vōcālem praecēdēns. Sed invēnī verbum Hispānicum "mientras" ex ...
4
votes
1answer
72 views

How to change the “Ex libris” (from books) used in books to get the meaning “from diaries”?

I do not know any Latin at all. Could you please help me to solve the following problem? I am wondering what would be a correct equivalent for "ex libris" used in books to change the meaning ...
4
votes
1answer
56 views

When should you use genitive pronouns and when should you use possessive adjectives?

I was reading @brianpck's post about genitive pronouns vs possessive adjectives, and trying to understand when it's better to use one versus the other. Compare these two sentences: Mater non est apud ...
6
votes
1answer
780 views

Æ ligature – the definitive answer

I have tried a search on the internet, but did not find anything official. I am looking for the definitive explanation of the symbol "æ" in Latin. Is it equivalent to the diphthong "ae&...
3
votes
1answer
428 views

Meaning of Latin expression in the law context

Please, explain to me the meaning of the Latin quote 'sensum, non verba spectamus'with some example-situation of using that quote. Thank you for any help!
2
votes
1answer
47 views

Small English phrase into Latin Tattoo

The phrase I want to translate is "I am my own" into Latin. The translations I have seen are different so I'm hoping someone understands the context and can help. It's meant to be a ...
5
votes
1answer
601 views

How do I say “like a bull in a china shop”?

Searching, I found this page, which says "de armento in Sinis tabernam", which sounds to me like a (bad) literal word for word translation. How can I express the feelings behind the English ...
4
votes
1answer
89 views

How do I say “Remember death, but do not forget to live” in Latin?

it's been a few years since I was in a Latin class, but I've been wanting to get a tattoo in the language for a while now, and "Remember death, but do not forget to live" is the phrase I've ...
6
votes
1answer
219 views

Positioning 'quoque' in the sentence

Let's take the following sentence Julius is also angry. One way to say it is Iulius quoque iratus est. But can we say it like this Iulius est quoque iratus? But if there is the option to put it this ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

What's the translation to “will's mystery witness”?

I thought of "testimōnium mystēriī voluntātis", but I'm unsure if that's correctly structured.
3
votes
1answer
140 views

Ethics of Spinoza – About word order

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Appendix: Si exempli gratia ex culmine aliquo lapis in alicujus caput ceciderit eumque interfecerit, ... demonstrabunt lapidem ad hominem interficiendum cecidisse. Ni enim ...
4
votes
1answer
408 views

Chasing Two Rabbits

While reading old Question: Two birds with one stone? I was reminded of the Russian expression: "A man who chases two rabbits will catch neither." In English we speak of the futility of &...
5
votes
1answer
105 views

What are the Latin translations of the mathematical terms differentiating, integrating and parameterizing?

I didn't find any site that translates these verbs in the mathematical sense. What are the Latin translations of these terms, and are there any sites that offer Latin translations of modern ...
3
votes
0answers
34 views

Saying “dissident” in the sense of political noncompliance

The definition of the word "dissidens" doesn't mention anything about political activism. What would be the way to denote someone who is a political dissident, like Noam Chomsky?
4
votes
2answers
74 views

How do I say “always remembered” on a locket with a picture of my Dad?

To engrave on a locket with a photo of my father after his death
9
votes
1answer
774 views

“With all due respect” in Latin

Several sites, including the notorious Google Translate, have Salva pace to mean "with all due respect". However I could not confirm this from classical sources, yet we can find several ...
2
votes
2answers
72 views

How to say, “I escape” in Latin?

Would it be "ego evado?" If I put "evado" in Google translate for some reason it says it means "gain." I want to be able to say things like, I escape in my Corolla. and ...
6
votes
0answers
53 views

Was deliberately bad grammar ever used for emphasis in Latin?

In English, we can sometimes use deliberately incorrect grammar for effect in speech. The first example that comes to mind is a more colloquial example: I ain't never going to do... When I hear this ...
4
votes
2answers
233 views

Does “ita” Have Two Roles: Part of Construction “ut…ita” & Functioning as an Intensifier in the Same Complex-Conditional Sentence?

In North & Hillard Ex. 210 Blosius is summoned before the Consuls and told to denounce his late friend, Gracchus; or, face execution. The whole passage is to be translated into Latin: this part of ...
6
votes
1answer
106 views

Is it φιλημι or φιλημμι?

In fragments of Sappho, we see athematic (μι-verb) forms for what Attic would call contract verbs, like φιλημ(μ)ι and καλημ(μ)ι for Attic φιλέω, καλέω. However, authorities seem to differ on how many ...
1
vote
1answer
68 views

What is “forever like a diamond” in latin

The question is in the title. I tried several different websites for the translation but all give me something different and everything seems to be wrong. The closest one was "Semper sicut adamas&...
7
votes
3answers
2k views

How do you say “Heroes are never forgotten.” in Latin?

Besides, its [of the Latin language] grammar also seems not to allow making statements that you would expect a truly natural language to allow, like "Heroes are never forgotten." The Flat ...
3
votes
1answer
425 views

Did Isidore of Seville ever claim Roman god of wine, Bacchus, got his name from “baculus” (walking stick)?

On multiple places on-line, including Wikipedia, there is information that Saint Isidore of Seville claimed that the name of the Roman god of wine, Bacchus, got his name from "baculus" ...
4
votes
1answer
91 views

How would you translate “There, but for the grace of God, go I” into Latin?

As in title. 'Illuc sine Dei gratia vadam' doesn't seem quite right. The phrase derives from 16th century reformer John Bradford's comment as he watched a group of prisoners being led to execution. ...
7
votes
1answer
323 views

Can a gerund introduce a subordinate clause?

Reading this recent question about whether the main verb introducing a purpose clause with ut can be in the passive voice, I thought about writing an answer that basically said: The main verb can be ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

Is my translation of “You are imperfect vessels of memories and you corrupt their perfection” into Latin correct?

In a previous question I asked for a word that could be used to mean vessel, in the sense that it is a person holding something immaterial. I'm now translating the rest of the sentence that includes ...
7
votes
1answer
113 views

Is “rogamur ab eo ut veniamus” grammatically correct?

It is grammatically correct if I turn any Main active verb in the Indirect commands into passive ones? Active - rogat nos ut veniamus - He asks us to come. Passive - " rogamur ab eo ut veniamus &...
1
vote
1answer
118 views

Faust: “Namen sind Schall und Rauch”, Nomina sunt

From a quick search this German aphorism appears to be from (at least in) Goethe's Faust. The Latin parallel that comes to mind is Nomen est Omen. With that in mind, I often find myself reaching for a ...
4
votes
1answer
629 views

Is there a Latin word for “vessel”, as in a human receiver or holder or something

I'm looking for a Latin word for "vessel", which in English can mean a person who receives or holds something immaterial. Options I've found so far are receptor,acceptor, gerulus, and ...

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