All Questions

2
votes
1answer
25 views

Lost and Confused

In North & Hillard Ex. 195 the following is to be translated into Latin: "All order thus being lost, Nicias surrendered at discretion. He and Demosthenes, being condemned to death, died by poison."...
7
votes
2answers
258 views

What sort of grammatical construct is ‘Quod per sortem sternit fortem’?

In the poem ‘O Fortuna’ (anon., 13th c., but made famous by Carl Orff’s setting), there is this verse: Quod per sortem sternit fortem mecum omnes plangite! This is typically translated as ‘...
4
votes
1answer
47 views

“I came, I saw, I am playing” = “veni, vidi, ludo”?

This came up as an idea for a team phrase for a sports team. The purpose would be to convey that people visited, joined, and are still playing the sport. (Disclaimer: I know almost nothing of Latin.) ...
4
votes
3answers
42 views

Did Google Translate give me a literary grade translation of “to the end of the chapter.”

I'm typesetting a book wherein the author regularly references his other works, inviting the reader to study from one particular sub-section until or through the end of the chapter. Unfortunately, ...
3
votes
1answer
147 views

How do you pronounce “Aeclepiadae”?

Just as the title says. Or should it really be "Asclepiadae", since it comes from "Asclepius"?
4
votes
1answer
35 views

Can someone check my translation?

I'm trying to translate an epitaph and I have no idea if I'm even close to right. It sounds really clunky at best. Can someone check it? Here's the original: stirpe fui, forma, natoque, opibusque, ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Translation for “Made by” or typical Latin equivalent

I’m looking for the correct way to say “made by” or “created by” for a custom garment tag. I have heard of "fecit" coming after a name but I’m thinking about bookplates and the “ex Libris” header as ...
3
votes
0answers
33 views

Verbal Adjective of Necessity vs. Possibility

Greek distinguishes between verbal adjectives ending in -τέος and verbal adjectives ending in -τός. The latter (according to Smyth) express either possibility or the perfect passive participle (e.g. '...
5
votes
2answers
374 views

How to modify 'inter arma enim silent leges' to mean 'in a time of crisis, the law falls silent'?

I know the popular phrase inter arma enim silent leges means in a time of war, the law falls silent. I want to modify the phrase to say 'in a time of crisis, the law falls silent'. I've not ...
3
votes
0answers
30 views

Conjugation/grammar for fictitious title

In a work of fiction, I have an Order of ordained detectives that do not exist. I use the term Lictor Rebus Sanctorae for the Order, and Lictor Rebus Sanctorus for the male protagonist. I know this ...
16
votes
3answers
3k views

Can “ee” appear in Latin?

There are a few instances in Latin where words are spelled with two vowels next to each other, in hiatus: filii "sons", metuunt "they fear". Now, the last words of the Emperor Julian II are normally ...
6
votes
2answers
53 views

Parsing “Vale, o valde decóra” in the Ave Regina Caelorum

Ave, Regína cælórum, Ave, Dómina Angelórum: Salve radix, salve porta, Ex qua mundo lux est orta: Gaude, Virgo gloriósa, Super omnes speciósa, Vale, o valde decóra, Et pro nobis Christum ...
9
votes
1answer
323 views

Did “benedicere” ever mean “to blaspheme”?

I was struck by some verses in Chapter 21 of 3 Regum, Vulgata. This tells the story of Naboth, an Israelite who owned a vineyard which was adjacent to the palace of the Israeli King, Achab. Naboth ...
3
votes
1answer
37 views

Where does the saying “Quod licet Jovi not licet bovi” come from?

Where does the saying "Quod licet Jovi non licet bovi" come from? My Google research was not satisfactory. Any book or article you know of that can guide me?
5
votes
2answers
80 views

When are -ns words used with accusative direct objects?

In English, one common generalization is that "-ing" words only take direct objects when they are verb forms, not when they are true adjectives or true nouns. (There are only a few possible exceptions,...
4
votes
1answer
42 views

What is the latin word for “smoked” or “cured”?

I need to get the proper latin drug name for "smoked jujube fruit", which might be "fructus jujube fumatus", but I suspect there might be more than one word for smoked / cured products in Latin, which ...
3
votes
1answer
52 views

Etimology of the word “σκευή”

What's the origin of this word?Is it indo-european?
3
votes
1answer
54 views

Etymology of “immediatus”

Context There is an ongoing discussion here on the intended meaning of the word "immediately", as found in the 1950's encyclical Humani generis, by Pope Pius XII. The declaration states: human ...
4
votes
1answer
78 views

Why aren't cardinal numbers over three inflected?

I've been looking through some etymologies and it seems to me that cardinals past trēs aren't inflected. Is this correct, and if so, what's the logic in forming words with indeclinable numbers? Take, ...
1
vote
1answer
35 views

Trying to translate 'Blood promises glory'

I'm trying to translate 'blood promises glory' into Latin. Google translate provided me with Sanguinis Promissa Gloria and I like it, sounds good, but I really want to run it past someone who actually ...
3
votes
2answers
48 views

Uter vs. Uterque

The way I learned 'uter' and 'uterque' was as follows. 'Uter' is like the Greek 'πότερος', meaning (in interrogative uses) 'which, of two?' and (in non-interrogative uses) 'either, of two'. I learned ...
3
votes
1answer
35 views

Translating sentence but how do I deal with conjugation - if it's plural in English, is it plural in Latin?

I want to translate "Fear is a crossroads" but I'm confused because in English, "crossroads" is plural, but uses the singular article "a". So would my sentence be "Timor est compitum" or "Timor sunt ...
6
votes
2answers
63 views

Are “magister” and “majesty” etymologically related?

My teachers are 'Magisters.' My king is his 'Majesty.' My dragon is 'Majestic.' Is there some etymological link between the Latin word for 'teacher' and the words we use for exaltation?
3
votes
2answers
48 views

Trying to come up with a sort of wordplay phrase that translates to “power takes control”

Trying to come up with a sort of wordplay phrase that translates to “power takes control” but uses a Latin word that can mean both takes as in requires and takes as in takes away from you. This is for ...
3
votes
1answer
38 views

How to say “shake hands” (or handshake) in Latin?

In Galatians 2:9 there is a reference to a handshake between Paul and other Apostles: So, James, Cephas and John, these leaders, these pillars, shook hands with Barnabas and me as a sign of ...
5
votes
2answers
62 views

Checking translation of “ubi vitam amavisti, illuc reverteris”

I heard once someone say: "where you loved life, there you will return". My attempt to translate that into Latin is ubi vitam amavisti, illuc revertēris Is that correct? Or is there a way to ...
5
votes
1answer
65 views

How to translate “Carpe That Diem” properly into Latin?

I was in a store today when I came across a notebook that said "Carpe That Diem" on the cover. How would one translate this phrase into Latin properly? At first I thought to simply translate "that" ...
5
votes
4answers
438 views

How to pronounce 'que' and 'angeli'?

I came along these in a Latin song our choir is singing. How to pronounce them? I guess I can absorb an international phonetic alphabet transcription. Update after reading some answers: I should ...
8
votes
0answers
98 views

Received pronunciation in Ancient Greek

As S. Teodorsson argues in his work on the phonemic system of the Attic dialect, there is evidence that already in the IV century BC, 'popular' Athenian speech underwent changes such as the merger of ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Pay for one's mistake's. Evil brings sorrow

Pay for one's mistake's. Evil brings sorrow. How to say these two phrases in Latin language? Thank you.
1
vote
1answer
38 views

A translation into Latin of the medical term “curative intent”

Would ‘destinatus ad sanandum’ be a good translation of the medical term 'curative intent'? The phrase 'curative intent' is used specifically for cancer patients where the surgeons or oncologist ...
4
votes
2answers
73 views

Did the Greeks or Romans have future fiction?

Did the Greeks or Romans have any literature describing events in the future? The modern era has produced a number of books and movies concerning a future society with flying cars or other ...
2
votes
0answers
27 views

How do I translate “On the Nature of Renewal” into Latin?

I'm trying to create a title in latin: On the Nature of Renewal where Renewal could be exchanged with Rebirth or Regeneration, and Nature is maybe better as Subject. With this structure, I figured ...
1
vote
0answers
29 views

How many Greek letters are there?

The Greek alphabet currently has twenty-four letters, and this has been standard for millennia now. However, three extra symbols are used for numbers, and other answers mention letters like tsan used ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Gradient Descent and Backpropagation in Latin

I came across this and was wondering if other terminology in artificial intelligence can be translated to Latin. Considering how deeply entwined the field is with science and philosophy, it is only ...
4
votes
3answers
194 views

How accurate is the typical definition of a deponent verb?

Deponent verbs are often (always?) defined as verbs that have passive forms but active meanings. But how accurate is this typical definition/generalization? It seems clear that this definition applies ...
3
votes
3answers
116 views

What did σκάλα exactly mean in Byzantine Greek?

In Spanish we have a word escala that means "stopover" as "a break in a journey", specially when travelling by sea. According to the dictionary by the Royal Spanish Academy, the word comes from ...
2
votes
2answers
38 views

On the use (or not) of genitive in some verses of the Vulgata

I'm a bit puzzled with some verses of the Vulgata, regarding the use or not of genitive. Consider 3 Regnum (1 Kings in non LXX-based bibles). Verses 13-15 in Chapter 10 go as follows: [13] Rex ...
5
votes
1answer
52 views

Are vestiges or influence of the instrumental case in any way identifiable in Latin and Greek?

I believe the instrumental case was absorbed by the ablative in Latin and by the dative in Greek. Is there any way at all in which influence of the old instrumental can be seen in Latin or Greek?—...
2
votes
4answers
114 views

How do you say “three times a week” in Latin?

How do you say "three times a week" in Latin? For context, I want to say that I swim three times a week.
3
votes
2answers
36 views

Why is “ita vero” two words?

I was taught the way to say "yes" in Latin is two words: "ita vero". It seems counter-intuitive that it's two words, but why is that so? In essence, why is the Latin word for yes two words? Does "ita" ...
2
votes
2answers
50 views

Translating a Latin phrase from an animated show

I remember a cartoon show named "Gargoyles" (follow this link please) I used to see when I was young. The hero there used to use a sort of magic tool to travel through time. He used to say something ...
5
votes
1answer
37 views

Do we ever see “in saeculo saeculorum”?

Recently, luchonacho asked about the phrase in saecula saeculōrum: literally, "into the lifetimes of the lifetimes". It's kind of a weird phrase, for multiple reasons. However, I'd always thought the ...
4
votes
1answer
53 views

Do we know how Greek dialects sounded?

To some extent, we know how sounds varied between ancient Greek dialects: the Aeolians lost rough breathings but preserved digamma, for example, while the Attics changed many of their long alphas into ...
6
votes
1answer
110 views

<quality> even for being a <noun>

Salvēte omnēs, hocc erit mihi prīmum rogātum hāc in sēde. Haud dūdum vīdī quendam hominem scīscitārī, quōmodo posset Latīnē dīcī "he has a long tail, even for a cat". Ad quod rogātum cum respondēre ...
5
votes
2answers
74 views

When did σχ become [ʃ]?

In Tsakonian (a modern descendant of Doric Greek), the letter combination ΣΧ is pronounced [ʃ] (the first sound in English "ship"). However, it seems clear that this wasn't the ancient pronunciation, ...
6
votes
2answers
79 views

On the literal meaning of “in saecula saeculorum”

Literally, this phrase (found originally in the New Testament of the Vulgata) is translated as "into [the] ages of [the] ages". It's supposed to be an expression of eternity, and it's commonly ...
3
votes
1answer
29 views

Which Latin verb was closer to the current meaning of English “solve”?

Nowadays the English verb solve means: Find an answer to, explanation for, or means of effectively dealing with (a problem or mystery). The etymology of the word indicates that it comes: from ...
4
votes
1answer
46 views

Checking translation of “optimus magister is fuit qui scivit quid discipuli peterent: auxilium”

I would like to know if this sentence is correct: optimus magister is fuit qui scivit quid discipuli peterent: auxilium What I would like to say in English is: "The best teacher was the one who ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Translating “I will be called Thomas.” into Latin

In relation to the first words said by a pope when he is elected, would it be right to say that if he chose "Thomas" then the translation of the above is: "Vocabor Thomas" Or is it "Vocabor Thoma"? ...

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