All Questions

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0answers
13 views

How to translate “Argument To Proof of Work”

Is the following the correct way to translate Argument To Proof of Work Argumentum Ad Probationem Operis The intention is to translate it in the same way as Argument to the Person Argumentum Ad ...
1
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2answers
31 views

How to determine if “senissimus” is a Latin word?

I noticed "senissimus" appears on Wiktionary, but it's not obvious if there are any other attestations of this word. How does one investigate whether this is a spurious Wiktionary page, or is indeed ...
2
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1answer
37 views

Did the Romans create any irregular verbs?

Most newly-formed Latin verbs were put into the nice, regular first conjugation: both deriving from existing words (dīcō, -ere > dīctō, -āre) and with borrowings (Graecissō, -āre). English is mostly ...
5
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1answer
170 views

Can 'non' with gerundive mean both lack of obligation and negative obligation?

If a gerundive is used with non, can it mean both lack of obligation and negative obligation? For example, can non loquendum est mean both "it is not necessary to speak" and "it is necessary not to ...
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0answers
16 views

Did 'liquidus' or 'liquo' mean 'abolish' and 'destroy, kill'?

I was reading the etymology of the English 'liquidate', when I read on Wiktionary that The sense "to kill, do away with" is a semantic loan from Russian ликвиди́ровать (likvidírovatʹ), ultimately ...
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0answers
6 views

How does the notion of 'limpidity' explain the etymology of 'liquidated' in 'liquidated damages'?

Paul Davies. JC Smith's The Law of Contract (2018 2 ed). p. 466 I'm trying to understand the etymology of the function words in the definition of 'liquidated damages'. I read Is liquidate(-tion) ...
0
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1answer
12 views

What semantic notions underlie 'loosen, release' and 'able to pay all one owes'?

To wit, how does 'loosen, release' semantically shift to mean 'able to pay all one owes'? Etymonline on 'solvent (adj.) 1650s, "able to pay all one owes," from French solvent, from Latin ...
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1answer
24 views

How do the statistics definitions of 'accuracy' and 'precision' relate to their etymons?

Etymonline entry of 'accurate': 1610s, "done with care," from Latin accuratus "prepared with care, exact, elaborate," past participle of accurare "take care of," from ad "to" (see ad-) + curare "...
2
votes
1answer
27 views

What is the connection between figs and pride in the word Caprificus?

I have seen the definitions of caprificus (caper + ficus = goat + fig) include both pride and fig trees /goat-figs. Are goats considered particularly prideful? I would think they would be more ...
4
votes
2answers
597 views

How do I say “this must not happen”?

I'm used to translating English auxiliary "must" with a Latin gerundive: hic necandus est "this man must be killed". But what if I want to say "this man must not be killed"? I would read non necandus ...
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0answers
27 views

On the interpretation of “ipse” in anticausative constructions

After having answered a question on "ipse" from a very different perspective (a philosophical one: [Does 'ipse' truly mean change? ), I return to linguistics: now I was wondering if ipse must ...
2
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3answers
120 views

Does 'ipse' truly mean change?

This quote hails from the liner notes to this CD: John Adams's Violin Concerto performed by Leila Josefowicz, David Robertson of St. Louis Symphony Orchestra. Alice Miller Cotter has a BA in Music (...
5
votes
1answer
81 views

Are there Roman accounts of Easter?

Now that it is Easter time, I wonder whether the Romans wrote about Easter. I am looking for non-Christian accounts in Latin describing the events of Jesus's death and subsequent resurrection. I ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

Deploying “Ut”/ “Quod”/ “Quin” plus Subjunctive

The use of ut + subjunctive in final/ purpose clauses is well-known/ well-established. But "quod" & "quin" seem to be deployed in near-identical circumstances e.g. in Ex 197 (North & Hillard): ...
2
votes
1answer
111 views

Declining “dulcis” in context

I want to translate the phrase It's just like a big recorder where "recorder" is the musical instrument. The generic Latin for "flute" seems to be "tibia" (pipe), so I settled on using the Latin ...
2
votes
2answers
99 views

How do I type Macrons on an Android device?

How do I type Macrons on an Android device?
5
votes
2answers
72 views

How to download an entire text from Perseus?

This is a technical question, but I hope it's on topic. The Perseus project contains lots and lots of Latin and Greek texts (and other languages too). I sometimes want to download an entire text from ...
7
votes
6answers
1k views

How to say 'striped' in Latin

I'm looking for a way to describe striped cloth — that is, with regular stripes all over, or like the stripes on the flag of the USA. I'm well aware of the stripe on a toga, angusticlavus, etc. But ...
3
votes
1answer
94 views

Where did the Greek sibilant letters come from?

The predecessor to the modern Greek alphabet was the Phoenician alphabet, which had four "sibilant" letters: 𐤆 zayin /z/ 𐤎 samekh /s/ 𐤑 ṣade /ṣ/ 𐤔 šin /š/ According to Jeffery, these turned into ...
6
votes
3answers
124 views

Was η called “eta” or “heta”?

Nowadays, the letter Η/η is called "ita" by Greeks and "eta" by physicists. But I'm curious: if I went back in time and talked to Socrates, what name would he have used? Background: historically, Η ...
4
votes
1answer
74 views

Such A Precedent

In the TV series, "I Claudius" (BBC, 1976) there was a scene in which the Ambassador, Appius Iunius Silanus, attempts to assassinate Emperor Claudius (occupational hazard) and fails. In the aftermath, ...
2
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0answers
37 views

Feedback on Latin to English Translation

I am currently learning Latin and is a beginner. However, I am unsure of my answers and is looking for help to proofread and provide suggestions for improvement. Would appreciate all feedback I ...
1
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2answers
121 views

How should this sentence be translated to Latin?

English: My ambition allows me to realise I do not have to sacrifice. Latin: Mea ambitia concedo mea comprehendo non habeo sacrifico. Is this correct?
5
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3answers
587 views

How to read αἱμύλιος or when to aspirate

I've tought myself to read the Greek alphabet, and it is still confusing to read and identify "h" sound in the ancient Greek. For example, Athena talks about Circe that she has "αἱμύλιοι λόγοι" in ...
4
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3answers
85 views

When to use accusative and nominative?

I am having some difficulty figuring out the Latin translation for the following sentences: My favourite animal is a dog. Will dog (canis) be considered as nominative or accusative (canem)? I want a ...
0
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0answers
44 views

Help translating short poem for book

I'm writing a book right now about a cult. I've tried using google translate to take the initiation vows for the cult and put them in Latin, but it ends up terrible. If anyone could help me get this ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

Looking for a direct quote from Heraclitus expressing that everything changes

I am in search of a direct quote (as close as possible) from Heraclitus that expresses the idea that life is flux -or- everything changes. With the help of this website I have been told that ...
4
votes
2answers
53 views

How would one say 'Spirit Subjugator' or something similar in Latin?

As per the title, I am looking for how you you would say 'Spirit Subjugator' or 'Soul Enslaver' or something similar.
1
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2answers
60 views

How to say “Indiana Jones” in Latin?

I know that usually we do not translate names, but how would you translate Indiana Jones into Latin? According to Wikipedia, Jones is literally John's son in Welsh, and it's related to Latin Ioannes ...
1
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1answer
57 views

Is this translation right?

I'm doing English to Latin translation and wanted to know if anyone could help me address the mistakes of my translation: Who is there who would allow the city walls to be destroyed on account of ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Is rough vs smooth breathing predictable?

Recently, I came across an excerpt from a scholium on Dionysius Thrax: Διὰ τί τὸ "η" πρὸ τοῦ "τ" ψιλοῦται, ἐν δὲ τῷ ἧτα τῷ ὀνόματι τοῦ στοιχείου δασύνεται; Ἐπειδὴ παρὰ τοῖς ἀρχαίοις ὁ τύπος τοῦ "Η" ...
2
votes
1answer
117 views

Looking for Correct Greek Translation for Heraclitus

I have found this quote in a variety of sources, but am wary of the Greek translation (knowing nothing of greek in its many forms over the years) COuld someone help me correctly find the original ...
6
votes
1answer
93 views

In what sense is a university (universitas) a whole?

The word for a university in many languages (not Finnish though!) comes the Latin word universitas. The word appears to mean roughly "the whole", but one might also analyze it along the lines of "...
4
votes
2answers
290 views

Translation norms: a dash instead of “esse”

What option is preferable in the translation of a phrase, say, "bad thoughts give rise/lead to bad results" in your opinion? Option 1: cogitationes malae – praemia mala Option 2: cogitationes malae ...
5
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2answers
47 views

How to say “search warrant” in Latin?

In law enforcement (and the judicial system in general in the U.S.) nearly every legal process has a Latin term. Although, one has escaped us and our legal staff. Our agency is looking for a Latin ...
4
votes
1answer
29 views

Switches Between Direct & Indirect Speech in Suetonius-Supplemental

Suetonius, Caius (Caligula) 58: concerns the assassination of Emperor Caius (Caligula) on January 21st., AD 41. At this point, the assassins have struck the first blows and Caius, still alive, ...
4
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1answer
57 views

Present Participles: can “respicienti” be part of an ablative absolute in this sentence?

Suetonius, Caius (Caligula) 58: ...alii Sabinum summota per conscios centuriones turba signum more militiae petisse et Caio "lovem" dante Chaeream exclamasse: "accipe ratum" respicientique maxillam ...
4
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2answers
265 views

Is ipsum/ipsa/ipse a third person pronoun, or can it serve other functions?

This question was inspired by a comment to an answer on this question: How would you say “same thing” in Latin? In which an answerer translated "Utinam idem sentires ac ipsa/ipse sentio!" as "If ...
5
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1answer
47 views

A Question about a Portion of Jerome's Preface to Judith

In his Preface to Judith, Jerome writes: Apud Hebraeos liber Judith inter apocrypha legitur: cujus auctoritas ad roboranda illa quae in contentionem veniunt, minus idonea judicatur. I, with an ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

How do you translate: What things, then, will you do?

how do you translate the following sentence: What things, then, will you do? I am particularly doubtful of the translation of "things" here. Would we use res, rei?
2
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2answers
72 views

How would you say “same thing” in Latin?

How would you say "same thing" in Latin? As in the sentence: If only you were feeling the same thing that I feel for you?
5
votes
1answer
77 views

Is this symbol for the letter N common?

Consider the picture below, depicting a cross allegedly found by monks of Galstonbury Abbey in a tomb (allegedly) containing the remains of King Arthur. It's suppose to say: Hic jacet sepultus ...
7
votes
2answers
2k views

What does “enim et” mean?

A couple days ago, a friend sent me an excerpt from a new game, asking about a Latin phrase in it: Contra Diabolus enim et alii Daemones (In the game, this is the motto of a group of Catholic ...
3
votes
1answer
334 views

What would the Romans have called “sorcery”?

In Christian Latin, the word maleficia is used for "witchcraft" or "sorcery": supernatural powers that don't come from God, and are probably associated with demons. A person who uses these powers is a ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

Switches between Direct & Indirect Speech in Suetonius

Suetonius, Caius (Caligula) 58: alii [tradunt] Sabinum summota per conscios centuriones turba signum more militiae petisse et Gaio 'Iouem' dante Chaeream exclamasse: 'accipe ratum!' ...
2
votes
0answers
111 views

How things change in Latin

After having provided an answer to Draconis’ question ( Did Latin have any ergative verbs? ), I was wondering about the (very subtle?) meaning differences involved in triads like {aperit/se aperit/...
1
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0answers
37 views

Using “R” to mark vowel length

When messaging a British colleague, I noticed something interesting in the orthography. Where I would write "she killed" as necāvit, she writes necarvit. In a non-rhotic accent, this makes perfect ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

An idiom for working as something

I would like to have a good idiom or two to express working in some position. A structure like this seems to be missing from my vocabulary, or at least I don't feel confident enough that what I might ...
2
votes
0answers
29 views

How to correctly translate phrase “knowledge builds upon knowledge”?

I would like to translate "knowledge builds upon knowledge" into Latin. Google Translate is obviously not good as it gives very different words depending on the structure of the English version, so I ...
3
votes
0answers
32 views

Did Frontinus mention siphons?

On a rather informative website on aqueducts, I came across the following passage: Frontinus is another classical author who wrote about aqueducts. Around 100 AD he was supervising the aqueducts of ...

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