All Questions

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
2
votes
0answers
21 views

why do I found hard not to palatalize the /g/ in digitus?

In latin words such as digitus, I found it hard to pronounce correctly the consonants /k/ or /g/ followed by /i/. I think that this happens especially if these sounds are in the same syllabe. Is it ...
5
votes
1answer
30 views

Hearing vs hearing that

The English sentence 'I heard you play the flute' can have three distinct meanings: At some point in the past, you played the flute while I was within earshot. Someone told me that you are able to ...
4
votes
1answer
59 views

Suffixes -τρον, -θρον, and -εθρον

Dickinson College's digitization of the grammar text by Goodell seems to suggest that -τρον and -θρον are synonyms. We also have πτολίεθρον, where it looks to me like the suffix is -εθρον (unless this ...
7
votes
1answer
337 views

What are the parts of speech in: "Mercurius imperia deōrum ad hominēs portat."

My enquiry arrises from a passage in “Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata”, in the tenth chapter which is entitled “BESTIAE ET HOMINES”. "Mercurius imperia deōrum ad hominēs portat." I see a ...
3
votes
1answer
235 views

commence < commensa = "joint table"?

M. J. Toswell, Today's Medieval University p. 24 claims a new master would eat at the commensa, the joint table, after his commencement ceremony of stepping upward Does the English word "...
3
votes
1answer
374 views

Is "intrum" a word?

There is a company called Intrum, which was called Intrum Justitia from its founding in 1923 to a merger in 2017. This strikes me as a clear attempt at making a name sound more prestigious by making ...
-2
votes
1answer
67 views

What's the cool killer app of Latin?

I'm about halfway through an introductory course on Latin, and I'm not particularly enjoying it. The problem I'm having is that it's coming across as a very generic, fussy language that's similar to ...
6
votes
1answer
86 views

A Question of Taste

On one of her many visits to Pompeii, TV-presenter, Dame Mary Beard met an Italian chef who was making fish-sauce, garum, according to the original Roman recipe. Upon tasting this culinary delight ...
2
votes
0answers
28 views

How to distinguish anthropology from human knowledge in Latin?

"scientia hominum" could mean both anthropology (the study of human beings) and "human knowledge" (the corpus of all knowledge acquired by human kind). How do you distinguish ...
8
votes
1answer
585 views

Is "sentire omnia" the correct way to say "feel everything"?

If you want to say "feel everything" in an advise-wise sense, is "sentire omnia" the correct way to say it? Or maybe it will be better to say "Sentias onmia"? Thank you!
11
votes
1answer
715 views

Is there a Latin translation of the Epic of Gilgamesh?

The Epic of Gilgamesh (Carmina de Gilgamo) appears to have been translated into many languages but I didn't find a Latin translation, does it exist?
6
votes
1answer
85 views

Translation of specific sentence in Latin

I would like to know how could I say something like "Make yourself at home, but remember you aren't" in Latin. It is a quirky thing a Brazilian friend says a lot (I've translated it to ...
5
votes
1answer
175 views

How do you 'concentrate your mind' on something in Latin?

I'm looking for the most common and natural ways to say this in Latin. Of the words provided as translations for 'concentrate' in Latin, ie, 'conlineo', 'contineo', 'congrego', only the last is ...
4
votes
1answer
79 views

A matching opposite of the word "axiom"

A rough search told me that the word axiom traces back to axíōma (ἀξίωμα), which roughly means "that which commends itself as evident". I am looking for a word which expresses the dual ...
5
votes
1answer
282 views

Are ἄρσην, ἄρσις and θήλυ, θέσις etymologically related?

In Mt. 19:14, "άρσεν και θήλυ" means "male and female". In music terminology ἄρσις means a stressed/emphasized sound, and θέσις the corresponding unstressed one. Is ἄρσις ...
0
votes
0answers
50 views

How can I translate this sentence in Latin [closed]

i would like to know how i could say " Art Feeds My Soul" in latin. If anyone can help translate it, i would appreciate it! Thank you!
6
votes
3answers
458 views

A short form for «as (it-) is»?

May there be an acronym, an abbreviation for the term «as is», «as it is»? The context the term used: to leave as it is, remain unchanged. P.S.: Found a word stet, which translates to let it stand.
3
votes
0answers
62 views

bonus liber melior est quisque quō maior [duplicate]

I had a real difficult time understanding this sentence from Pliny. It is used as an example in the Greenough grammar to eludicdate 'quisque' but it's actually 'quō' that is giving me trouble. It ...
4
votes
1answer
213 views

Augustine: me dare mihi velle quod eis dabas

Augustine in the Confessions writes: tu etiam mihi dabas nolle amplius quam dabas, et nutrientibus ??? me dare mihi velle quod eis dabas:??? dare enim mihi per ordinatum affectum volebant quo ...
3
votes
1answer
63 views

Subjunctive αἰδέσεται rather than αἰδέσηται?

Homer several times uses the subjunctive αἰδέσεται. I would have expected this to be αἰδέσηται, and wiktionary agrees with me. I guess the lack of an augmented initial vowel is a hint that this is a ...
5
votes
1answer
371 views

quis dabit mihi ut venias in cor meum

This is from Augustine's Confessions: ??? quis dabit mihi ??? ut venias in cor meum et inebries illud, ut obliviscar mala mea et unum bonum meum amplectar, te? which is translated as: Oh! that Thou ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Darius autem cum ex Europa in Asiam redisset

This is from Nepos on Miltiades. Darius autem cum ex Europa in Asiam redisset The translator put this as: Darius, when he had returned from Asia into Europe But I would think it would be: Darius, when ...
6
votes
0answers
97 views

Sigillare and sugillare

From signum ("sign") we have a diminutive form sigillum, "little sign", whence in particular: "wax seal made by one's ring print", to close and sign a letter or a box, ...
4
votes
1answer
149 views

Can 'talia' modify a noun with an adjective?

I want to say: 'such a strong group', and I'm thinking that this meaning of 'talia' found in the OLD can do this but in all of the examples none of the nouns are modified by an adjective. Does this ...
4
votes
1answer
227 views

What is the general ablaut rule that explains examples like φρήν, πρόφρων, πρόφρονα?

Φρήν (midriff, will) gives rise to the adjective πρόφρων (eager, literally motivated by will). It looks to me like the -ων comes from ablaut applied to -ην. (It doesn't look like a suffix -ων, since ν ...
2
votes
1answer
66 views

What's going on with ablaut in forms like ἔβην, βῆναι, φανῆναι?

Verb forms like ἔβην, βῆν, βῆναι, and φανῆναι seem to have some ablaut going on. My understanding of the phonological rules of ablaut in ancient Greek is from Pharr, 4th ed., p. 277, along with the ...
6
votes
2answers
115 views

Why the future perfect tense in "quamdiu se bene gesserit"?

The legal term quamdiu se bene gesserit means "as long as he shall behave himself well" (1) and is used when granting an office for an indeterminate time. See this entry in Black's Law ...
5
votes
1answer
74 views

"To hold a grudge" in Latin?

How does one say "to hold a grudge against someone" in Latin? A grudge is "a feeling of deep-seated resentment or ill will".
4
votes
1answer
91 views

What tense is the verb "data est" in?

What is the tense of data est? I feel like it is the perfect passive (he was given), but that would be datus est.
4
votes
1answer
112 views

Is it possible to make sense of the classical words and pronunciation in Dune, by Frank Herbert?

Dune is a classic science fiction novel by Frank Herbert. There have been attempts to film it, including an upcoming movie version covering the first half of the book. A lot of the names and ...
2
votes
1answer
57 views

Songs being sung in Classical Latin literature

Listening to Classical Latin literature I have noticed what sounds like songs being sung! For example the Lydia Dic part in Lydia Dic Per Omnes and the probās vocārī, Seu Genitālis part of Phoebe ...
8
votes
2answers
793 views

What does the word "recusus" mean in book titles?

A bit of a mystery here (for someone not very well-versed in Latin at least). I often encounter the word recusus in book titles of the post-classical period, usually but not always in conjunction with ...
6
votes
2answers
101 views

For what copulative verbs is the nominative case used in addition to est?

I'm a real beginner, but I was reading that a noun is declined as nominative for the predicative nominative, so: cattus est canis, the cat is a dog both cat and dog would be declined in the nominative ...
6
votes
0answers
59 views

Dominus vobiscum / omitted copula in subjunctive mood?

In Catholic liturgy, there is this ubiquitous expression used to join or precede important prayers where the priest salutes the assembly by wishing (or so I think) that the Lord be with them: Dominus ...
6
votes
2answers
334 views

What is the subject of "venit" in this sentence from Naufragium?

Reading Naufragium by Erasmus (1523), I came across this sentence. I include the whole sentence for context, but I'm only asking about the part in bold: Circumspicienti tandem venit in mentem de ima ...
4
votes
3answers
121 views

Sarcastic alternative to Alea iacta est

I am trying to sarcastically say essentially you're throwing a dice with only one option. I was researching and thought this kinda worked—alea incommutabilis iacitur—but I don't care for the use of '...
6
votes
1answer
67 views

Remainder and quotient in latin?

I am a beginner in Latin and I write most of my math lectures in Latin. I searched at Wikipedia and other sites but I can't find any translation of these words.
8
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there an English word derived from τάσσω, with a similar meaning of arranging/organising?

Apologies if this is the wrong site to ask this on. I am looking for an English word that is derived from Ancient Greek τάσσω, meaning I arrange, I draw up, or I order. I would like a word that evokes ...
7
votes
2answers
453 views

How do you say personal flaw in Latin?

The only context that I know of of this word being used is the Bible passage: 'remove the plank in your eye before you remove the plank in your neighbor's eye', but Jerome translates 'plank' as '...
4
votes
1answer
243 views

Feminine forms of adjectives in -ων: why ἀέκουσα, but not ἀπείρουσα, ἀμύμουσα?

The wiktionary entry for -ων says it's an ending cognate with stuff like Latin -ens, -iens, and gives the feminine as -ουσα. Therefore it makes sense that we get ἀέκων, ἀέκουσα. But then we have ...
1
vote
2answers
116 views

What is the correct translation for "Am I really alive?"

It's supposed to be a genuine question a character asks himself after waking from a dream. I've tried different online translators but I'm not sure if I can trust them. Any help would be nice.
2
votes
1answer
82 views

Im in desperate need of someone properly translating this sentence

"Into the furnace they tossed his soul." I've tried several different translation tools, but it always seems to change with each program. Can anyone please translate this to Latin? I would ...
6
votes
4answers
189 views

What is the evidence for *ḱw > *kʷː in Greek?

It seems to be commonly accepted that Proto-Indo-European *ḱw became something very close to *kʷ in Greek, hence ἵππος (Mycenaean i-qo = *hiqqos?) showing the same develarization as ἕπομαι. The ...
1
vote
0answers
69 views

Who was the last writer of Latin who was a native speaker

I have a feeling it is Isidore of Seville. Does anyone know if he specifically commented on the language spoken by the common people around him. I'm of course aware that there is no hard boundary ...
1
vote
0answers
76 views

Where I can find Old Latin word list?

Where I can find a list of Old Latin words where they differ from Classical Latin? Are words like oinos and comoinis attested, or they are reconstructions?
4
votes
0answers
145 views

Is Plain Latin a thing?

Plain language is writing designed to ensure the reader understands as quickly, easily, and completely as possible. Robert Leon Cooper (1989). Language Planning and Social Change. Cambridge University ...
10
votes
0answers
95 views

the kiskis and kankan debate: primary sources

There's a very famous story about how in the middle of the sixteenth century the Sorbonne University filed a legal claim to the Parlement de Paris re: the correct pronunciation of qu- in Latin, viz. ...
5
votes
1answer
442 views

Why is ἀτρύγετος = ἀ + τρυγάω + τος "formally not easy?"

Homer uses ἀτρύγετος as an epithet of the sea and sky. The etymology has traditionally been taken to be α participle formed from ἀ + τρυγάω, unharvested or barren, but Beekes says this is "...
1
vote
1answer
131 views

Amar vs encantar in Latin

As I've understood it, in Spanish there's a difference between using amar for people and encantar for things. Is there a similar difference in Latin? This page describes the difference: https://...
3
votes
1answer
70 views

Why κιχείη rather than κιχάνοι?

Book 1 of the Iliad has the optative form κιχείη. Wikipedia says that ordinarily we expect to see the -η- infix in singular optative forms when the verb is athematic or a contract verb. Neither seems ...

15 30 50 per page
1
2 3 4 5
96