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0answers
25 views

Translating 'creative by nature' / 'naturally creative' into latin

I would like to know the meaning of 'creative by nature' or 'naturally creative' in latin. According to google translater it is 'natura partum', but when translated back into english it means ...
6
votes
3answers
382 views

Translating “Father knows beer best” into Latin

I'm making a label for my dad's homebrew as a Christmas gift and I'd love to include "Father knows beer best" in Latin as the motto of his company. Could anybody help translate that for me?
2
votes
0answers
60 views

“Alēctō” or “Allēctō”?

"Alēctō" is the name of one of the Furies, made surprisingly famous in the Harry Potter books. It seems to come straightforwardly from Greek a- "not" + lēg- "stop" + -tos "[adjective]", so "...
5
votes
1answer
1k views

What would this pun mean?

In a conversation with a fellow Ancient Greek enthusiast, the name "Medusa" (Μέδουσα, "ruling") came up. I made a rather tortured pun by switching the epsilon to an eta, creating μὴ δοῦσα. Now, μή is ...
4
votes
2answers
249 views

Origin of “lunatĭcus”

In Spanish we have the word lunático with the following meaning: One who suffers from madness, not continuous, but at intervals. This word comes from Latin lunatĭcus. According to Lewis & ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

What was the standard ancient term for a thermopolium?

This page on thermopolia reports a quotation from Mary Beard, classics professor at Cambridge University: “The best way to escape a diet of bread, cheese and fruit, eaten in small lodginggs over a ...
6
votes
0answers
46 views

How did the “injunctive” work?

According to Wikipedia: Homeric Greek does not have a historical present tense, but rather uses injunctives. Injunctives are replaced by the historical present in the post-Homeric writings of ...
7
votes
2answers
103 views

Present Subjunctive Passive

North & Hillard Ex. 213; Q5: the following is to be translated into Latin: "I am willing to send anyone at all to find out what is going on." The answer: "volo quemvis (quemlibet) mittere ...
5
votes
1answer
89 views

Meaning of “supra se servitium”

Background In the TV series Fallet, some of the upper class of the fictional town of Norbacka use the phrase supra se servitium as a sort of salutation. Its meaning is never elaborated upon. My ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Translation check: propter scientiae amorem

The good people over at latindiscussion have been helping me with a project I'm working on. Now that I'm nearly finished, I would like to double check the results. Take the motto: "propter scientiae ...
4
votes
2answers
65 views

How to say “me importa un comino” (or equivalent) in Latin?

In Spanish there is a whole array of phrases of the type: Me importa un comino. where the word "comino" can be replaced by many alternatives (e.g. pito, pepino, bledo, etc). This phrase, in a more ...
10
votes
1answer
508 views

Why “dilatasti” instead of “dilatavisti” in Psalm 4:2?

(Psalm 4:2) cum invocarem exaudivit me Deus iustitiae meae in tribulatione dilatasti mihi miserere mei et exaudi orationem meam When I called upon him, the God of my justice heard me: when I was ...
8
votes
2answers
1k views

An error message in Latin for my programming language

I am writing a piece of software that translates programs into programs (a "compiler", in informatics lingo) and my source language allows the programmer to specify Latin numerals. In case the ...
4
votes
2answers
61 views

Was there any difference between “grātĭa” and “făvor”?

The Lewis & Short dictionary defines gratia as: grātĭa, ae, f. gratus; lit., favor, both that in which one stands with others and that which one shows to others. I. Favor which one finds ...
10
votes
1answer
561 views

Exactly what is a declension?

I was reading a Latin grammar book (Jenney's First Year Latin, for the curious) having recently resolved to learn a bit about the language and what I understood was as follows: Latin is an inflected ...
2
votes
3answers
95 views

Help translating “There is no god above an awakened man”

Looking for a suitable latin translation for the phrase "There is no god above an awakened man" among latin quotes and text examples, I came up with these -obviously imperfect- phrases. Non deus ...
8
votes
1answer
780 views

Why was ante tribus translated as “fifteen years ago”?

In an answer I posted here, I provided someone else's translation which translated ante tribus as "fifteen years ago". The translation provided in the question also translated tribus the same way: ...
7
votes
2answers
491 views

How was the “elliptical dual” used?

In a comment on this answer, TKR brought up an interesting point of grammar I'd never heard of. Αἴαντε [Ajax-DUAL] is an interesting case. Though readers of Homer since antiquity have interpreted ...
8
votes
1answer
153 views

Understanding a reference to Corpus Inscriptionum Latinarum

On page 33 of Companion Animals & Us, there is a line: I am in tears, while carrying you to your last resting place as much as I rejoiced when bringing you home in my own hands fifteen years ...
6
votes
3answers
486 views

How to phrase “I like the way you think” in Latin?

Is there a concise way to phrase "I like the way you think" in Latin? I can find ways to say this, but everything I could think of is a little unwieldy compared to the English. For example, I might ...
8
votes
1answer
106 views

Hexametric Greek names

A number of Greek names encountered in hexameter follow the syllable length pattern -vv-; consider for example Penelope, Telemachos, Calliope, Terpsichore. The pattern -v-- is absent as the metric ...
3
votes
1answer
105 views

Issues with the lyrics of the UEFA Nations League anthem

Recently, a new international football competition was inaugurated, namely the UEFA Nations League. Being this a European-wide cup, the organisers decided to have the anthem in ... Latin! Certainly a ...
3
votes
2answers
56 views

How do you address someone in a case other than the vocative?

Suppose I'm talking to someone directly, and use a pronoun to refer to someone. I would use tu or vōs with an appropriate case based on its role in the sentence: for example, sciō tē adesse, "I know ...
2
votes
1answer
46 views

“Ite, missa est.” Direct meaning of “Missa est” [duplicate]

In the Catholic liturgy at the dismissal, the Latin phrase used is "Ite, missa est." The usual translation for this is "Go, it is the dismissal." My question is, what is the meaning of "Missa est" ...
3
votes
2answers
112 views

Translating “If the minimum wasn't good enough, it wouldn't be the minimum” into Latin

Can anyone translate for me: "If the minimum wasn't good enough, it wouldn't be the minimum" I had a tutor help me ages ago and thought what she decided was the best translation seemed like it ...
8
votes
2answers
109 views

When was the dual number used in Attic Greek?

I have only studied the very basics of Greek years ago, so the question might be simple, but I couldn't find a clear summary anywhere. Attic Greek has a dual number alongside singular and plural. When ...
4
votes
1answer
30 views

Unde “Laelaps”?

Laelaps was a mythical hunting dog that could always catch its prey. The name comes from Greek λαῖλαψ, "hurricane". But where does this word come from? LSJ doesn't provide an etymology, and ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

Timeline of classic grammarians

I'm seeking a timeline of classic (Greek/Latin) grammarians/grammar books. The timeline could either be a graphical one or a textual listing (like this one for the English language). Most favorable ...
0
votes
1answer
66 views

Can you please fix the mistakes in translating these prayers from Koine Greek to English (Part 2 of 2)?

This is a continuation from this question I do not know nearly enough Koine Greek to point out what I am specifically unsure about. That said, I do know enough to see that the Greek and English texts ...
-1
votes
1answer
64 views

Can you please fix the mistakes in translating these prayers from Koine Greek to English (Part 1 of 2)?

This question is continued here I do not know nearly enough Koine Greek to point out what I am specifically unsure about. That said, I do know enough to see that the Greek and English texts do not ...
6
votes
2answers
60 views

History of grammatical term “Clause”

Does the present analysis of sentences to "clauses" (subordinate, etc.) has any roots/relatives in the classic grammar books (in Ars grammatica books, etc.)? I would be tankful for any hints or ...
9
votes
1answer
117 views

Did the Romans really speak of “mare nostrum”?

I have heard a number of times that the Romans called the Mediterranean Sea mare nostrum, "our sea". But was this really the Roman name for the Mediterranean Sea in any significant way? I have three ...
2
votes
1answer
47 views

How to say “of the” as in “Church of The Blessed Virgin” with the sense of “belonging to” or “patronage”?

I would be glad if anyone could help me how to translate the name "Church of the Virgin Mary" or at least how to place "of the" in the sense of "belonging in patronage" in such contexts? Other ...
7
votes
1answer
267 views

What declension are θορυβος and κοσμος?

I'm curious about what declension θορυβος and κοσμος are in Attic Greek. They appear to be second declension (θορυβος, -ου and κοσμος, -ου), but in the Athenaze workbook (which I'm slowly working my ...
4
votes
0answers
44 views

Did “supradictis” ever meant “aforementioned”?

In 1 Samuel 7:16 we read: et ibat per singulos annos circuiens Bethel et Galgala et Masphath, et judicabat Israelem in supradictis locis. The English translation (see link) of supradictis is (the ...
4
votes
2answers
64 views

“Extinguat et me, ne manu nostra cadat!”

I've seen this quote appear in a few different places, ostensibly from Seneca's Octavia. (Or maybe not Seneca's, we're not sure.) Extinguat et me, ne manu nostra cadat! However, I don't have a ...
6
votes
2answers
204 views

The use of participle in “Ceres a generendo”

I'm trying to read this sentence, where Cicero finds Roman Gods in relevance to the Latin verbs: Saturnus quia se saturat annis, Mavors quia magna vertit, Minerva quia minuit aut quia minatur, ...
3
votes
2answers
63 views

How to say “the word as a weapon”?

As the titles implies, I wish to know how "The word as a weapon" translates into Latin. I think it would be a cool name for a debate club that I'm setting up.
4
votes
1answer
78 views

How to better distinguish words in Gregorian Chant?

When listening to Gregorian Chant (in Latin), I find very hard to distinguish the words being sung, beyond some trivial regular words or phrases. It might well be said that Gregorian Chant is ...
4
votes
1answer
129 views

Latin usage & perfect passive finite verb forms

I understand that a perfect passive finite verb is formed by combining the perfect passive participle with the correct form of 'esse'. My question is this: Does it ever happen that the second ...
3
votes
1answer
40 views

How to search for nouns ending in -ile?

When I was researching for this question of mine, I wanted to find nouns similar to missile. I used the L&S on Perseus and searched for all words ending in -ile, but missile was not included. The ...
4
votes
1answer
125 views

Reflexive Pronouns

North & Hillard; Ex. 195: the following is to be translated into Latin: "But, since his men had found no water to drink for many hours, they could not be restrained from rushing into the water, ...
5
votes
2answers
658 views

Understanding “jam nunc”

The expression (idiom?) jam nunc appears several times in the Vulgata. So far I've seen two common translations. One is that of "now presently". For instance, Exodus 9:19: (Latin) Mitte ergo jam ...
4
votes
2answers
64 views

What is a boyfriend or a girlfriend in Latin?

When answering this question, it occurred to me that I don't know what to call a "boyfriend" or a "girlfriend" in Latin. What would be good words? I assume that the same solution will work for both ...
7
votes
2answers
950 views

Could we say “dies mirabilis” as we say “annus mirabilis”?

"Annus mirabilis" is an expression which refers to a wonderful year like 1905 for A. Einstein and modern physics. What would be the equivalent for a single day? Is "dies mirabilis" the correct form? ...
8
votes
1answer
101 views

Why did the Ro­mans per­ceive dark­ness, ᴛᴇ­ɴᴇ­ʙʀᴀᴇ, as a plu­ral count noun?

Why did the Ro­mans per­ceive dark­ness, te­ne­brae, as a plu­ral count noun? [Per­se­us cor­pus-search ref­er­ence] Or per­haps the bet­ter ques­tion is: what spe­cial nu­ance is con­veyed by the ...
6
votes
1answer
55 views

how to interpret ‘formosus’ via its morphological components

The adj. formosus can be decomposed as follows: forma + -os-us where forma means ‘shape, form’ and -os- ‘with abundance’. However, when the two notions come together, the whole, which literally ...
3
votes
0answers
38 views

Differentiating possessive and genitive?

In English, " 's " often denotes the possessive meaning, while "of" more of a genitive tone, e.g., compare "John's photo" and "a photo of John". However, I have not found anything similar in Latin, ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

Inlustrus: A conundrum

I stumbled upon this exchange so I hope you can help me. I'm writing a book of poetry, and I wanted to title it Starlight, but why use English, am I right? So I made the rookie error with Google ...
7
votes
1answer
45 views

Did the “-ālis” and “-āris” suffixes have the same meaning in Latin?

In Spanish we have two suffixes -al and -ar with the same meaning: "after a noun it indicates an abundance of the original word". So from naranjo ('orange tree') we have naranjal ('a group of orange ...

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