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Uppercase vs lower case: Name is Lambdadelta. What is this in symbols? λδ? ΛΔ? Λδ? λΔ?

Lambdadelta is a character from the 2 Japanese anime/manga/VN series Higurashi No Naku Koro Ni (When The Cicadas Cry) and Umineko No Naku Koro Ni (When The Seagulls Cry). There's this Umineko arc ...
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  • 139
6 votes
1 answer
149 views

"Neuter alteri plenam copiam pecuniae tum dabit"

This is the fourth exercitationes from chapter nine of Wheelock's 7th edition latin textbook. Im translating some sentences as practice for a final exam. I translated the sentence as "Neither of ...
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4 votes
1 answer
249 views

What is the translation of actions speak louder than words in Latin?

I would like to translate the phrase "actions speak louder than words" into Latin. actiones seneca was the translation that Google translate provided. Is that accurate? Thank you!
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  • 43
4 votes
1 answer
106 views

Gender of Street Names and Village Locations

I can find references on the gender of countries and cities, but nothing on street names or small locations (say within a village). Transcribing Manorial Records of the late 17th century, I have a ...
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7 votes
1 answer
715 views

In the "Pater Noster" prayer why is 'panem nostrum' sometimes "quotidianum" and other times "cotidianum"?

In the "Pater Noster" prayer, why is "panem nostrum cotidianum" sometimes written as "panem nostrum quotidianum"?
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  • 71
8 votes
1 answer
95 views

How do we get around the fact that 'extera' appears rarely as masculine

In the OLD it says that 'exter' is rare as a nom sing masc adjective but in the LASLA database it does not appear at all as a masc positive adjective in any case. As a superlative the masculine '...
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  • 2,035
1 vote
0 answers
48 views

How would the Ancient Greek noun λόρδων decline, and is the LSJ's definition of it correct?

I'm very familiar with Latin declensions, and have the resources necessary for that, but I have found nothing for Ancient Greek that I am able to make use of, especially considering my lack of ...
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5 votes
0 answers
51 views

What Happened to Whitaker's Words?

Don't worry it still exists. My problem is that I like speaking Latin, and Whitaker's Words has been my go-to for English to Latin translation. In the last couple of months, they have removed their ...
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  • 2,923
6 votes
1 answer
460 views

Can magna be a noun or an adverb?

In this passage from Ars Poetica we find: Ī́ncēptī́s grăuĭbū́s plērū́mque‿ēt mā́gnă prŏfḗssis Pū́rpŭrĕū́s, lātḗ quī splḗndĕăt, ū́nŭs ĕt ā́lter Ā́dsŭĭtū́r pānnū́s I can't figure out if 'magna' is an ...
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  • 2,035
5 votes
2 answers
700 views

Is it possible that elision is sometimes just attraction?

I'm sorry for the improper use of notation and lack of terminology, but I know very little about meters. There is this famous hymn in Catholic liturgy called Veni Creator [Spiritus]. AFAIK, it follows ...
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  • 10.1k
2 votes
1 answer
155 views

Why is "expugno" in the Subjunctive in this Multi-Verb Indirect-Command?

In Titus Livy's "ab Urbe Condita" 26.1.2: "Q. Fululo Ap. Claudio, prioris anni consulibus, prorogatum imperium est atque exercitus quos habebant decreti, adiectumque ne a Capua quam ...
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  • 6,940
3 votes
0 answers
55 views

On words with non-Classical meanings in LLPSI

I found Lingua Latina per se Illustrata(LLPSI) use the word kalendārium for calendar (as in Chap. 13, and the official Latin-English wordbook), but in both dictionaries L&S and OLD there is just ...
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2 votes
0 answers
61 views

How do you say "The Etruscan language died as many years ago as there are stars in the sky and nobody understands it." in Latin?

What do you guys think, is "Abhinc tot annos, quot stellae in caelo sint, lingua Etrusca mortua est, nemoque eam comprehendit." be good Latin for that?
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1 vote
0 answers
27 views

have the last word/ be the last word (in fashion)

What suggestions would colleagues suggest for this English phrase? Example sentences are:- -Everyone started shouting, trying to have the last word, and the whole meeting just descended into chaos. -...
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5 votes
1 answer
97 views

Translation Problems in Cicero's "ad Familiares 10.21.6"

While reading the Wiki entry on "opera", I found this example from Cicero's "ad Familiares 10.21.6": "ut exercitum locis habeam opportunis, provinciam tuear, etiam si ille ...
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  • 6,940
9 votes
1 answer
578 views

"quae haec mihi dōna dedistī"

In the story "Atalanta" in Fābulae Syrae by Luigi Miraglia, Venus gives Hippomenes three golden apples to throw during a foot race with Atalanta, to distract her. As he throws the third ...
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  • 14.4k
6 votes
1 answer
343 views

How would you translate "The Adorned" for use as a collective title?

I took a few years of Latin back in high school, but my understanding of the language never really surpassed novice levels. I've been brainstorming names for a wolf pack in a story of mine; a lot of ...
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5 votes
1 answer
360 views

How to analyze and translate "non se luxu neque inertiae corrumpendum dedit" (Sal. Jug. 6)?

By taking a look at various translations of the sentence in bold below, which is excerpted from a famous portrait of Jugurtha by Sallust, one could infer that the datives luxu (cf. luxui) and inertiae ...
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  • 6,442
7 votes
1 answer
2k views

How to say "See Naples and Die" in Latin?

I am not a student of Latin; I merely wish to give my short story a Latin title, namely the Latin translation of "See Naples and Die." The best I could find, not understanding Latin grammar, ...
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5 votes
2 answers
230 views

What word does 'iucunda' modify in this sentence from Cicero?

I am reading a letter fom Cicero to his friend Atticus and can't quite pinpoint exactly how the word iucunda functions thereof: "Nam mihi omnia, quae iūcunda ex hūmānitāte alterius et mōribus ...
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3 votes
1 answer
201 views

Can someone explain this construction?

I'm trying to read the opening (Latin) poem of Robert Burton's The Anatomy of Melancholy. Here's a link to the page in the edition. The title is Democritus Junior ad Librum Suum. For some reason ...
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4 votes
2 answers
451 views

Unsure why the accusative relative pronoun is used? [Tacitus Annals 2.24]

I hope this is the right place to ask this, and I hope it seems I have done enough research before asking. Basically, I am working my way through translating Tacitus' Annals, and have come across ...
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  • 43
2 votes
1 answer
103 views

How to express a prayer intention

I'm new-ish to speaking Latin - specifically praying in Latin. When praying with my family, we like to express prayer intentions before beginning (eg. "For so-and-so" or "For charity&...
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  • 31
6 votes
1 answer
70 views

to fiddle while Rome burns

I only want to find if there is an equivalent to the above phrase in Latin. I am aware of the history and origin of the phrase and what instrument Nero was playing and what he was doing at the time ...
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-2 votes
0 answers
55 views

How would you say "The Etruscan language has been dead for years as numerous as the stars of heaven and nobody knows it." in Etruscan? [duplicate]

What do you guys think, would "Nac avil pulumχva falatul snuiaφ, aca Rasnal amuce ziv, nanatnam ica cnara." be good Etruscan for "The Etruscan language has been dead for years as ...
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2 votes
1 answer
358 views

How would you say “night reader?”

As the title states, I’m curious how one would say “night reader.” As in, someone who enjoys reading late at night!
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  • 21
4 votes
1 answer
305 views

How does one translate "a fighting thing" and "a running away thing"?

In the same way "a thinking thing" is translated into Latin to res cogitans, how would you translate in Latin "a fighting thing" and "a running away thing"?
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0 votes
0 answers
65 views

Is there a Simple Latin?

For english, a simple version of the language, called Simple English has been defined — an english-based controlled language — as an aid to teaching english to non-native speakers. Has it ever been an ...
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  • 208
3 votes
0 answers
70 views
+150

Present vs. perfect tense in potential conditions

Potential conditions, in the English speaking world also known under the name “future less vivid” (for a critique of that particular term, see here), are conditional sentences that talk about supposed ...
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4 votes
2 answers
183 views

Is there a Latin dictionary that indicates word frequency?

Of all the dictionaries out there, do any indicate the frequency of words (e.g. from very frequent to very rare)? My problem is that sometimes I learn a random page in my Latin dictionary but I don't ...
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14 votes
4 answers
4k views

About capitalization "The first letter of a sentence in Latin is not capitalized"

A Latin tutorial said "The first letter of a sentence in Latin is not capitalized." That's strange. And most Latin texts I have seen do not obey that rule. Most Latin tutorials I have ...
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  • 143
5 votes
1 answer
92 views

What is the behaviour of liaisons and elisions over a caesura?

I'm currently composing a Latin poem, which I'm writing in Alcmanian strophes. The dactylic tetrameter is not usually thought of as having a caesura, so my question pertains mostly to the hexameter ...
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  • 51
6 votes
1 answer
227 views

Transcribing Latin with or without ligatures -- is there an agreed convention

I'm working on the transcription of some late seventeenth century English Manorial Court Rolls in Latin. They're heavily abbreviated. In some places the scribe has visibly written a ligature in e.g. ...
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9 votes
1 answer
218 views

Knowing the two quantities of 'est'

There are several forms of ĕsse and ēsse (= edere) that only differ by the quantity of the initial vowel, perhaps the most common one being ĕst/ēst. How do we know this difference in quantities? ...
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7 votes
1 answer
109 views

how best to express 'in case of...'

can 'in case of + noun' be translated as si + genitive, e.g. 'si ignis' (in case of fire)? or is a verbal clause (i.e. si forte + subjunctive) more idiomatic? thanks!
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  • 71
3 votes
1 answer
50 views

Sentence in Rhetorica ad Herennium

Iste, inquies, qui se dici divitem putat esse praeclarum, primum nunc videte, quo vultu nos intueatur: ... (IV. 63) What's the structure of the qui-clause? Should it be qui(:=iste) putat [se dici ...
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5 votes
2 answers
465 views

"Audi nos" translation problem

Commonly, Audi nos is translated as "hear us". Audi is the imperative form of the verb but nos is ordinarily translated as "we". How does "we" become "us"? Is ...
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3 votes
1 answer
103 views

What is the Literal Translation of "vestigio suo" in Suetonius' "Divus Augustus 28.2"?

In Suetonius' "Div. Aug. 28.2": "...et moriens ut feram mecum spem mansura in vestigio suo fundamenta rei publicae quae iecero." = "...and in dying I will carry the hope ...
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  • 6,940
5 votes
1 answer
81 views

Why is Cnaeus rendered as Νάϊος in RGDA?

Chapter 18 of RGDA opens with the following (Cooley’s CUP edition of 2009, macrons added by me): [Ab illō annō q]uō Cn(aeus) et P(ūblius) Lentulī c[ōns]ulēs fuērunt, cum dēficerent [ve]ct[ī]g[ālia, ...
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  • 3,007
6 votes
1 answer
390 views

I with superscript ma

There is a footnote (45-35) in (Milman's 1845) Gibbon that looks like this: See Brenkman, Dissert. Ima de Republicâ Amalphitanâ, pp.1-42, ad calcem Hist. Pandect. Florent. I have not been able to ...
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  • 307
1 vote
1 answer
52 views

What are the etymological roots of the adverb emuncte?

What are the etymological roots of the adverb emuncte ?
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  • 11
2 votes
1 answer
146 views

Possible Origin of "ergo"

Is it possible that the Latin conjunction "ergo" was derived from the dative singular of the Greek word "εργον", meaning task?
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5 votes
1 answer
70 views

Does the verb eruo mean to rescue or deliver?

I'm reading Psalm 42 verse 1 from the Vulgate Bible. Here is the translation on vulgata.net: Psalmus 42:1 Psalmus David. Judica me, Deus, et discerne causam meam de gente non sancta, ab homine iniquo ...
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  • 11.1k
3 votes
1 answer
236 views

S at the end of Present Active Participle Pronunciation

I've noticed that we tend to pronounce the "s" at the end of present active participles (e.g. navigans) as /z/. But in ancient Roman times, would it really have been pronounced this way, /...
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7 votes
1 answer
90 views

Origin and actual quote of the proverb "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion"

While searching for the Latin quote of the proverb "Caesar's wife must be above suspicion", I was a bit surprised because the form that I know of that proverb was "It's not enough for ...
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  • 173
6 votes
3 answers
117 views

What would this site be called in Latin?

Ignoring the technological shock that would likely happen from seeing a computer and the internet, what would Cicero or Caesar call the "Latin Language Stack Exchange" website? While I would ...
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  • 6,975
10 votes
2 answers
611 views

Minimal pair for hidden quantity

Is there an example where the quantity of a vowel makes a difference in a syllable that is heavy by position? For a concrete example, this does happen in Finnish (where long vowels are written as ...
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3 votes
0 answers
52 views

Yes, sir, no siir, three bags full sir

Is there a Latin expression which is used by someone who sarcastically or semi-humorously pretends to be completely subservient and complies with everything that is asked of him (without even ...
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5 votes
2 answers
309 views

Why ipsa and not ipsae in Psalms 42:3?

Psalms 42:3 in the Vulgate has: Emitte lucem tuam et veritatem tuam. Ipsa me deduxerunt... Why is it ipsa and not ipsae?
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2 votes
0 answers
44 views

Are there different words for an excerpt and its location in Latin?

In Latin, locus can be the passage of a text (e.g. Cicero says he is going to translate a passage in one of his speeches and uses locus if I remember correctly) but it can also be the location of the ...
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