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4
votes
1answer
22 views

Can ‘per’ occur with accusative gerundium?

In my grammar (Samson Eitrem: Latinsk grammatikk, 3rd edition, by Bjørg Tosterud and Egil Kraggerud, Aschehoug, 1996), under § 146 Gerundium, he states that: Akkusativ brukes etter preposisjonene ad ...
3
votes
1answer
28 views

What feminine noun is implied in ἐφέροντο τὴν πρώτην “were the leaders” (Philostratus)?

Philostratus, Lives of the Sophists 1.18: ἡ Ἀθήνησι δημαγωγία διειστήκει πᾶσα, καὶ οἱ μὲν βασιλεῖ ἐπιτήδειοι ἦσαν, οἱ δὲ Μακεδόσιν, ἐφέροντο δὲ ἄρα τὴν πρώτην τῶν μὲν βασιλεῖ χαριζομένων ὁ Παιανιεὺς ...
2
votes
0answers
27 views

How would you describe someone as being completely alone?

If I wanted a very succinct way to say some person or thing was completely alone, how would I say this in Classical Latin? For example, if someone was drifting far out in the void of space where they ...
6
votes
2answers
356 views

Is “ab octo vocibus” a correct translation of “for eight voices”?

I'm wondering because of a composition I'm writing. I'm thinking of "Contrapunctus duplex ab octo vocibus" as a title for a movement.
4
votes
0answers
51 views

Oblique cases and 'si quis'

It is convenient to formulate conditions with si quis, for example: Si quis me audiet canentem, non gaudebit. If anyone hears me singing, they will not enjoy it. Here the same unnamed person is the ...
2
votes
0answers
61 views

Modification of Latin adage

Is this a good alternate Latin translation of "Never give up, never surrender?":Numquam desiste, numquam dede!
1
vote
1answer
55 views

Grammatical modification of quote attributed to Appius Claudius Crassus Caecus (340-273 B.C)

Is this grammatically correct: "Quisque fortunae suae faber est"?
7
votes
2answers
412 views

Latin translation of common adage: God helps those who help themselves

Is this an accurate Latin translation of "God himself will come to the aid of those who help themselves?": Sese iuvantes Deus ipse adiuvat (or adiuvabit)?
4
votes
1answer
190 views

What is this character saying in Latin?

I was watching the latest Asterix movie. I know that people who know Latin sometimes don’t like the way it’s used in Asterix, but hear me out. There is this scene where the pirates are trying to get ...
8
votes
2answers
119 views

Stacked/Consecutive Genitives

For example, the way of the cross in Latin is via crucis, but how would one go about saying the beginning of the way of the cross? Would both via and crux be in the genitive, yielding principium viae ...
6
votes
2answers
281 views

What is the correct vowel quantity for the participle of legō?

In the following, vowel quantities which I am uncertain of, will be marked with both a breve and a macron, so they should not be considered the answer; that is what I am searching for. This whole ...
5
votes
1answer
253 views

Why are there circumflex accents in these words? — κορῶναι, αἶγες, αἶγας

This question is about the Homeric dialect. crow/gull = ἡ κορώνη, κορώνης, 1st decl., feminine goat = αἴξ, αἰγός, 3rd decl., masculine or feminine In the nominative plural, the copy of Homer I have ...
5
votes
1answer
76 views

What does “ad minūtim” mean? Does it mean the same as “minūtus”?

I understand that minūtim is a conjugation of minūtus. Is that correct? What does "ad minūtim" mean and what would minūtus mean?
0
votes
0answers
55 views

Is this sentence in Latin correct? Tractatus Dialogico Philosophico De Faceta [closed]

Is this correct in Latin? If not, what is correct? The sentence is: Tractatus Dialogico Philosophico De Faceta.
2
votes
0answers
85 views

What is the origin of the phrase “James the Great”?

What are the earliest attested usages of the phrase "James the Great" (or "James the greater") in reference to "James son of Zebedee"? The attestation will be in Greek or ...
3
votes
1answer
75 views

What is the Role of “hoc” in Cicero's de oratore 2.25.108?

In Q: Why Does Cicero use the Third-Person Singular Instead of the Plural Form?, the following extract from Cicero's de oratore 2.25.108 was studied: "...in quibus hoc praecipit ratio et ...
7
votes
3answers
819 views

Translate “mind over body”

I should start by saying that my experience with latin extends as far as the fact that some words sound similar in italian, not much more. I'm trying to translate the idiom "mind over body", ...
4
votes
1answer
71 views

In what sense is “securitas” a condition of being “without care”?

This post states that se is a prefix that means "without". Wiktionary coincides on that regarding the Latin word securus, which is described as a compound between se and cura, "without ...
7
votes
1answer
115 views

Use of “in” with ablative

I'm hoping someone can clarify the meaning of the medieval Latin phrase "in ipsa" when referring to a decision or action not being "in" or "upon" someone, which I assume ...
9
votes
1answer
483 views

Plural of axis mundi

The phrase axis mundi is used frequently in archaeology and art history to describe certain places as a "world center" or "center of the universe" in Indigenous or ancient/...
5
votes
1answer
325 views

Why Does Cicero use the Third-Person Singular Instead of the Plural Form?

Cicero, de Oratore (2.25.108): "...in quibus hoc praecipit ratio et doctrina ut vis eius rei, quam definias sic exprimatur ut neque absit quicquam neque supersit," "...on which ...
6
votes
2answers
105 views

how to express “indefinite distributive numerals” (“several dollars each”)? is aliquoteni classical?

In answer to the question Quotiens? (How many times), one can respond with aliquotiens (several times). But for the question Quoteni? (How many of each), can he come up with aliquoteni? For I can't ...
9
votes
0answers
75 views

Coordinating positive and negative imperatives

For positive commands, Latin uses the imperative: Da mihi librum "Give me the book." For negative commands, it uses a number of constructions of which noli + inf. is most common: Noli mihi ...
7
votes
1answer
432 views

What is the difference between these two variants of the word?

I am looking for a Latin translation of the word arsonist. Having made translations in various machine translation software it all narrows to two choices. One is incendiarius and the other is ...
8
votes
2answers
98 views

Aeolic and Ionic personal pronouns: paradigms for recitation?

I'm having trouble getting all the Homeric pronouns under my belt for purposes of reading comprehension. Just for grins, I wrote a little script that goes through the Project Perseus treebank for ...
3
votes
1answer
81 views

What was “ultra terminum” translated to from Horace's poem?

The translation on Perseus for this poem by Horace, gives the following for the third verse: namque me silva lupus in Sabina, dum meam canto Lalagen et ultra terminum curis vagor expeditis, fugit ...
6
votes
2answers
372 views

How can you find the stem for an adjective in Latin?

For example, for the word bonus, bona, bonum ('good') the masculine nominative singular obviously has the same stem as the oblique forms. But, with a word like 'our' (noster, nostra, nostrum) how can ...
5
votes
0answers
38 views

Latin “Basic” Colors and Shades

Salvete Omnes, While I am working on a Minecraft resource pack that changes the Latin, which hopefully fixes some rough spots in it, I came back to a problem which strikes me occasionally with colors ...
4
votes
1answer
107 views

“And I am done with my graceless heart…”

I've come up with the following translation for the Florence + The Machine lyric "And I am done with my graceless heart, so tonight I'm going to cut it out and then restart": Et corde ...
2
votes
1answer
172 views

How do I say: I'm not afraid of you

I'm not sure if one uses the adjective or verb of FEAR in this case 😭 What I have is the following: EGO DE TE NON METUO
3
votes
1answer
110 views

What would be a proper reaction to the question: “Can you come over?” or how do you say “Coming” in Latin?

In a comment to this question, JoonasIlmavirta suggests a spin-off question. I have had this question simmering for quite some time, but this is a nice incentive. Consider the following cross-language ...
3
votes
1answer
90 views

Translate “I will not comply”

Any suggestions on how to translate the phrase "I will not comply?" I could just translate it word-for-word, but maybe there is something out there in the corpus that's idiomatic.
7
votes
1answer
114 views

Is there a more idiomatic way to say “to begin again”?

Incipere iterum seems like a very literal way to say "to begin again". Is there a more idiomatic way to say this? For additional context, when I think of this phrase, I think of something ...
9
votes
1answer
230 views

A question on line XV.167 of Ovid's Metamorphoses re 'eque'

My question concerns the use of the word 'eque'. As far as I can see it is the vocative of 'equus' but that clearly doesn't make sense and I can find no other meaning of the word in the dictionary. ...
2
votes
2answers
70 views

How does one say “Beyond the curtain (for a theatre)”, in Latin?

I don't really know enough about Latin morphology or grammar to get a clear cut answer (already knowing that Latin is a very free-form language), so how does one say it? I was thinking something like ...
5
votes
1answer
255 views

Can a gerund stand alone?

In response to a question e.g. "How will you maintain order?" (= "quomodo tu disciplinam sustentabis?"), the answer could be, "By ruling." In Latin, an ablative of the ...
4
votes
1answer
54 views

How do I say “be one” in Latin?

How do you say "be one" in Latin? As an example, Marcus Aurelius famously states (along the lines of) "Stop asking what a good man should be - be one." I don't think it can be a ...
5
votes
2answers
130 views

Do imperative verbs usually go first or does it still follow the regular SOV order?

In this example, what would make more sense: MITTE MIHI PICTURAM PRODUCTI or PICTURAM PRODUCTI MIHI MITTE
5
votes
0answers
60 views

What are the semantic, pragmatic, or other differences between -tio, -tus, -tura, and other action nouns

Salvete Omnes, While answering this question on a motto related to computers, I was going to question the authority of Vicipaedia's use of words derived from programma, particularly action nouns from ...
3
votes
1answer
48 views

Motto About Chaos

I want a latin motto that expresses "Out of chaos, software" Or "From chaos, software". I know software is a strange concept for Latin. Any suggestions?
8
votes
1answer
676 views

What can we say about the pronunciation of Z?

The letter Z was borrowed into the Latin alphabet in order to transcribe Greek loanwords, along with Y. Presumably, educated Latin-speakers pronounced it like its source, Greek zeta. However, Greek ...
2
votes
1answer
140 views

recordings of eras of Latin

I'm not sure if this question is allowed here or not but are there recordings of eras of Latin (Old Latin, Late Latin, and Vulgar Latin) and also African Latin that are recited as perfectly as ...
5
votes
1answer
74 views

How to properly translate “Monstrous Universe” phrase into Latin?

I've recently started on developing my own gaming project. Some of the words, proper nouns in particular, are planned to get translated into Latin. The problem is that I'm not native speaker of Latin, ...
10
votes
1answer
2k views

What does 'a vowel followed by two consonants' exactly mean?

In his New Latin Grammar, Bennett states (5.B.1.c): A syllable is long if it contains a short vowel followed by x, z, or any two consonants" As an example to this rule he gives the word restō, ...
5
votes
3answers
137 views

Can “homo” be used as an impersonal pronoun?

In English, we can say "one must do this" or "one should do that", as a way of referring to any person, not just one person in specific. Can homo be used in a similar fashion in ...
7
votes
1answer
58 views

Latin names for groups of animals

How should I go about naming groups of animals in Latin? Should I use a single word like grex in all situations, or should I use varying words depending on something? In English — and I simplify for ...
5
votes
2answers
265 views

When using the verb *to be* do you always use nominative for subject and object?

When using the verb to be do you always use nominative for subject and object? For example: FEMINAE DOMINAE VIRORUM SUNT. Or FEMINA EST PULCHRA
6
votes
2answers
86 views

Creating a motto for teachers

I am a doctoral candidate in education and one of the theorists for my work is Parker Palmer, an American educator. In his book, The Courage to Teach, he said something I thought perfect for my ...
9
votes
3answers
469 views

Do vocative forms of participles exist?

I wondered if the vocative forms of participles really exist. E.g. the vocative of vocatus would be vocate, same with vocaturus and vocature. Both forms can be found on pages like Wiktionary (vocate, ...
9
votes
4answers
2k views

Is There a Latin Euphemism for “Dying”/ “Dead”?

One of Joonas's old Qs. has made a welcome return: Is there a Latin euphemism for going to the toilet?. This brought to mind the fatuous things we say about death: "He's passed over."; "...

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