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Why does this sentence have an ablative subject for an indirect subordinate clause?

In this sentence, hoc anno is the subject of esse, so I expect it to be in the accusative. "hunc annum". Also, futura should agree in gender to annus, masculine. What am I missing? (If it's not ...
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13 views

Self-Isolation to Garden-Conversations

As new terminology enters the public lexicon how would some of these be expressed in Latin? Self-Isolation: from segrego with a reflexive pronoun: "se segregat" = "he isolates himself. The reflexive ...
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0answers
47 views

effeminare = evirare (?)

Assuming that (i) the meanings of vir and femina are indeed opposite and (ii) the meaning of the prefix ex- is quite transparent, why are the verbs evirare and effeminare then synonymous? Are there ...
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54 views

Purpose clauses [closed]

i have an assignment due tomorrow about purpose clauses and i don’t know anything about them please tell me someone knows how to do them!! I’ve tired it many times but i don’t know how to do it ill ...
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1answer
51 views

Medieval Latin to English translation

Secundo firmamentum caeli in medio libravit aquarum, ipsis aquis ac terra cum caelo superiore ac virtutibus, quae in ea conditorem laudarent, ante horum sex dierum exordium creatis. This sentence is ...
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1answer
64 views

What creative pursuits can I follow using the Latin Language?

While we're stuck in quarantine I have plenty of time to create. Here's what I've tried doing so far: Helping answer easy questions on the Stack Exchange Translating songs into Latin/Writing songs in ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Modification of my Scottish Clan Motto (luceo non uro)

I am in the process of planning out a tattoo, and I want to get my family's clan motto. The Mackenzie Clan motto is Luceo Non Uro Which as I understand translates to "shine not burn." That said, ...
3
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1answer
29 views

What is the difference between Future Perfect Indicative and Perfect Subjunctive

In Reginaldus Foster's text book Ossa Latinitatis Sola, he states that, apart from the First Person Singular, the forms for Future Perfect Indicative and Perfect Subjunctive are the same. And, indeed, ...
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4answers
6k views

What is bullshit in Latin?

If a statement is blatantly wrong, one can call it bullshit in English. But how about Latin? Is there something more strong and colorful than falsus? I am not convinced that a direct translation would ...
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1answer
41 views

How to determine the ending of a Latin noun?

In LLPSI, I have seen Latin be Latina, Latinum, and Latinae. What are the differences of these words and how do I determine which to use?
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7answers
2k views

Can one translate ἀθάνατος as 'living' rather than 'immortal'?

Context There is an old hymn, often referred to as the Trisagion or Thrice-Holy. It goes like this in Greek: Ἅγιος ὁ Θεός, Ἅγιος ἰσχυρός, Ἅγιος ἀθάνατος, ἐλέησον ἡμᾶς. (Transliterated, this reads,...
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1answer
38 views

Valerius and Valentinus have the same root?

Valerius is derived from "Volesus" or "Volusus", which in turn is derived from "valere", to be strong. Valentinus is derived from "valens" meaning "healthy, strong" So "valere" comes from "valens"?
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1answer
43 views

Difference between “Ubi est subject” and “Subject ubi est”?

In LLPSI, there is this line: Ubi est Nilus? Nilus in Africa est. Rhenus ubi est? Rhenus est in Germania. In both questions, the wording changed around, as did in the answers. Does this wording ...
4
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2answers
77 views

Crocodile vs. cocodrile: where does the “r” belong?

We are all familiar with crocodiles. We know, love, and recognize them in many European languages: German: Krokodil French: crocodile Portuguese: crocodilo Russian: крокодил But perhaps it comes as ...
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0answers
35 views

Where does au-fugiō come from?

Hittite has a verbal prefix u- that indicates motion away from something. Kloekhorst connects it to Latin au-fugiō, "to flee from", saying they both come from PIE *h₂-u-. However, I'd always thought ...
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7answers
5k views

Can you say “the” in Latin?

I'm reading Collar and Daniell's First Year in Latin right now and they mention that Latin has no articles such as "a", "an", and "the". Is this true? I have heard the book be inaccurate before.
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1answer
27 views

Can “Regula falsi” be interpreted as “False position”?

In Mathematics, there is a technique which is known as Regula Falsi, and it is heavily implied that its translation to English is "False position" (for example, in the Wikipedia article). This seemed ...
14
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1answer
1k views

Meaning of “cum inter nonnullos”

I'm reading The Name of the Rose, by Umberto Eco, which has a lot of Latin phrases and expressions, since the story is set in the 14th century and the protagonist is a franciscan friar. The expression ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Is there a suffix in Latin like the “-ization” suffix in English?

I'd like to express "synchronization" in Latin. There's the adjective "synchronus," but no verbs or nouns that I can find. The "-ization" suffix in English comes from "-ize" and "-ation," which come (...
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0answers
44 views

Etymology of the name Laurentius

Laurentius is a Latin name that means "From Laurentum" (a city near Rome). It is possible that the place name Laurentum is derived from the Latin laurus ("laurel"). The Greek form Λαυρέντιος (...
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1answer
461 views

liberalis corporis et sanguinis christi… liberalis?

I've come across an unusual use of "liberalis", and I wonder how it should be translated. It's in a Catholic catechism, which heads one section: "liberalis corporis et sanguinis christi domini ...
4
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1answer
104 views

Idiomatic translation for family motto from English

When working on an improved version of our clan's crest, it was decided to add the motto (which had so far been absent from the design). The motto in English is "no time for caution". Related ...
6
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1answer
202 views

Irregular aorist imperative from ἔχω

Why does ἔχω exhibit a 2 s. aorist imperative σχές instead of what I would expect to be σχέ ? Do other verbs do this, or is this peculiar to this verb?
3
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1answer
66 views

Word parsing in Latin declensions

I'm trying to parse a few sets of Latin words divided into the categories: perfect participle, present participle and gerundives. I'm struggling a bit. Particularly with gerundives. For instance, in ...
3
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2answers
97 views

Ancient Greek translation

I'm not sure where to post this so I thought I would try here. Please let me know if there is a better place for this. I am creating a series of stories and there is some minor connections to ...
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1answer
88 views

Confine yourself to the present in Latin

I know that Meditations was originally written in Greek, but I'm curious to know how you would write "Confine yourself to the present" in Latin? Thanks.
4
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1answer
115 views

Pronunciation of Jehovæ

The Tremellius and Junio's Bible in Is. 60:1-2 renders the Hebrew name of God (יהוה) as Jehovæ. how is this word properly pronounced in Latin? Thanks!
4
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2answers
73 views

Motto — All Debts Will be Paid

Looking for use of this in a motto, like below a family coat of arms. No matter what, we will pay our debts to those we owe. Thanks!
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1answer
71 views

Instructional book for the Medieval philosophy student

I'm seeking for a book which contains several fragments of the medieval philosophical works, literally translates them and explains the obscure points for who wants to improve his Latin.
10
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1answer
5k views

How to say “We are waves of the same sea, leaves of the same tree, flowers of the same garden” in Latin?

News sources have reported that China sent boxes of face masks and other medical supplies to Italy, stamped with this quotation and attributed to Seneca. For example, https://www.theguardian.com/...
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3answers
118 views

How do you say to “bear in mind” or to always “keep in mind” in Latin?

Self explanatory question. Okay so I know the word ‘remember’ in Latin is ‘memento.’ but I heard that there are different variations like meminero or something, but is there a way to say “to keep in ...
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0answers
41 views

Variation on Descartes' famous phrase

I would like to put a twist on Descartes' famous phrase, "Cogito, ergo sum". Effectively I want to say, "I am... I think?", raising the question of whether the existence we perceive with our senses ...
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0answers
27 views

How to Express the Pursuit of a Career?

Having reviewed verbs in the "to do"/ "to pursue" genre, it is still not clear which one is the most appropriate for "to do a job"/ "to pursue a career/ "to fulfil a position". This may indicate that ...
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0answers
41 views

How to properly convey non-Latin words in a practical Latin text?

My question here is firmly in regards to contemporary Latin, in the sense of Latin to be used not as a dead language (in other words, I am not looking for a Nosoponian answer that invalidates anything ...
2
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2answers
110 views

Amor est adequatio rei intellectus- is this correct for 'Love is the equalizing of understanding'?

I would like to find a Latin sentence similar to 'Veritas est intellectus rei adequatio' but with Amor instead of Veritas.
3
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1answer
68 views

How does one say lowlands in contemporary Latin?

How would one write the expression "lowlands" in contemporary Latin? Would it be like in Spanish, terra bassa, or would it be something like terra subiecta or even terra infera? I would prefer an ...
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0answers
53 views

Proper Translation of “Faith of Nine” to Latin

I am trying to verify the correct translation of the phrase "Faith of Nine" to latin. I typed it in on Google Translate and it gave me the following translation: Fidei Autem Novem. This is for a ...
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0answers
17 views

Translation of “to have consequences”

What is the best Latin translation of "This will have consequences.", as in "what has transpired will affect the future"?
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2answers
111 views

1783 Document - Dominum, Domino and Domina

I have a family document from 1783 in which an unmarried son is referred to as Dominum Conradinum (last letters of surname)...um, and the father is referred to as Domino Jacobo (last letter of surname)...
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0answers
44 views

nu + coronis at the beginning of homeric verses?

I need help understanding a passage from Chantraine's Grammaire Homérique (chapter XVIII, p. 222). Chantraine talks about the Ζῆν and Ζῆνα forms of the name Zeus. According to Chantraine, the aedes ...
4
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1answer
89 views

Living Latin term for work (in contrast with life outside of work)?

I know that there is no Classical concept of work in contrast with life (as in "I was at work yesterday" or "At work, people did X", etc.), but I was wondering if there is any post-Classical Latin ...
10
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2answers
2k views

Wifi or Wireless fidelity in Latin?

Salvē! I am new here and searched the questions, but could not find anything. In another site somebody suggested: interrete trans spiritum, but this seems too long. Maybe a catchy abbreviation such as ...
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0answers
34 views

Translate into Latin: “To will the impossible” and “with will and sacrifice”

Hello and thank you in advance. Two phrases I am interested being in Latin: "To will the impossible" and "With will and sacrifice" First one being similar to "If there is a will, there's a way." ...
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0answers
81 views

On different expressions of partitivity in Latin

I was wondering whether there is any difference between the following partitive expressions in Latin: ūnus tribūnōrum and ūnus ex tribūnīs 'one of the tribunes' (cf. the so-called 'partitive genitive' ...
5
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1answer
80 views

Is there a Latin equivalent to ἐπίκοινος?

The Ancient Greek grammatical tradition, going back to Dionysius Thrax (or maybe farther), distinguishes five types of nouns: masculine, feminine, neuter, common, and epicene (ἐπίκοινος). Four of ...
5
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1answer
470 views

Saying hello to a mixed-gender group

If you were greeting a mixed-gender group, what would have been the most common way to do this in classical era Rome? Would they have said something like salvete amici et amicae, or would they have ...
3
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0answers
31 views

The difference between fiducia and confidentia in these convoluted sentences?

What is the difference between fiducia and confidentia in these sentences, particularly the bolded one? I posted the previous verses for context. Feel free to critique my translation, which I know is ...
3
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1answer
72 views

Why does Nepos use the accusative here?

My son was assigned an excerpt from the Vitae of Nepos, Lysander 4, and hit a snag at the end of this sentence: nam cum Lysander praefectus classis in bello multa crudeliter avareque fecisset deque ...
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9answers
9k views

Why speak in Latin in 2020?

I'm a Stack-Overflow user, and usually, there is a sidebar where 'Hot' content from communities is shown. Today, one of those questions was this: What should the corona virus be called in Latin? Which ...
4
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1answer
153 views

Does /l̥/ in reconstructed Latin represent a voiceless (alveolar) lateral approximate or something else?

Latin facultās presumably developed from an original *faklitāts (via *fakl̥tāts > *fakiltāts > facultās) . . . —Merriam-Webster Does the /l̥/ in *fakl̥tāts represent a voiceless (alveolar) ...

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