1
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0answers
52 views

Can cases be replaced with prepositions + nominative?

Consider the word domus. Standard cases are domi, domo, domum, domo, domis. I wonder whether we could replace the above (and perhaps every single noun), with the "equivalent" preposition + nominative....
4
votes
1answer
61 views

Does a form “spiritum”, second declension neuter, exist?

Today, as I browsed Quora, I saw a question with an (apparently) blatant case error. I opened it, and curiously, one answer stated it could have been a correct case, since, while there is indeed "...
3
votes
1answer
797 views

What is the meaning of “e pluribus smart assimus”?

I am just curious what a phrase "e pluribus smart assimus" means.
1
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0answers
35 views

Is “que” or “et” better for a “God and Family” tattoo?

Hi I’m planning to have a tattoo and I would like to have a translation in Latin of “God and Family”. Which one is appropriate, "deo et familia" or "deo familiaque"?
3
votes
1answer
36 views

Why is the ablative used here instead of the genitive

Mark 1:6 starts with Et erat Joannes vestitus pilis cameli... Which is translated as "John was clothed with camel's hairs...." Why is it pilis instead of pilorum? Shouldn't pilis use genitive ...
3
votes
3answers
122 views

What is the Latin Homophonic Group?

Equivalent question: What Latin letters won't equal 1? From: the homophonic group: a mathematical diversion --> This is an exercise from Michael Artin's Algebra on, well, abstract algebra. In this ...
6
votes
2answers
55 views

Agreement in “medio tutissimus ibis”

Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book II, line 137 gives us the aphorism (in) medio tutissimus ibis The English translation for this is typically given as "In the middle, you will go most safe." How does "...
6
votes
2answers
165 views

What cases were used in compounds?

In Greco-Latin compound words, I generally use the bare stems for all but the last component, joined together with stem vowels (in Greek) or i (in Latin). For example, certifaciō (> certify) comes ...
6
votes
1answer
31 views

Adding translation of “potential” to “ad infinitum”

The phrase "ad infinitum" is often used in texts that are otherwise non-Latin. I would like to use a variation of this phrase in an English text. In philosophy of mathematics there is a distinction, ...
6
votes
1answer
52 views

A few questions about a Lobel-Page critical note

In a critical note by Lobel-Page, I read: κάλαις ὔμμιν cod. A, quo retento τὸ νόημ[μα] ci. Bekker. quod quamvis cum grammatici verbis aptius congruere videatur, tamen ob ν ἐφελκυστικόν positionem ...
4
votes
1answer
34 views

How do I negate an ut clause of result?

Ut clauses of result are excellent for saying "so ___ that". But what if I wanted to reverse this and say "not ___ enough to"? For example, tam strenue laborābam ut epistolās centum scripserim means "...
6
votes
2answers
53 views

Latin translation of ‘Strength, love and light’

I know people tend to advise against having tattoos in other languages but I have given it a lot of thought and definitely want it doing. I am hoping to have a tattoo that translates into ‘strength (...
6
votes
2answers
101 views

Is it possible to predict the gender of nouns?

As you are probably aware, Spanish owes a significant portion of its vocabulary to Latin. An interesting difference however is that Spanish has only two genders for nouns - feminine and masculine. The ...
3
votes
1answer
257 views

How do I do something “hard”?

"Hard" is sometimes used as an adverb in English to emphasize a physical action, or indicate that it was especially vigorous or forceful. For example, "he hit the ground hard when he fell", or "she ...
4
votes
1answer
56 views

Parsing Priapea IV

I'm kind of 'intermediate' Latin, and I can't find a completely satisfactory way to parse this poem (Priapea IV, Bucheler Ed. via latinlibrary): Obscaenas rigido deo tabellas dicans ex ...
3
votes
1answer
33 views

How it's better to translate “The best house” into Latin?

Can I use "Domus optima" or "Domus optimus" as the equivalent (I do not need a literal translation) of "The best house"? Should "optima" be used with a noun "domus" or both are correct?
5
votes
2answers
68 views

How would I say “as long as”?

Suppose I want to write about Meleager, fated to live exactly as long as a certain branch of wood lasts (no longer, no shorter). Or perhaps I'm writing about Cincinnatus, who agreed to hold power as ...
2
votes
0answers
32 views

Question related to “the tree of apples” in the Bible

Is it true that we tend to associate the tree whose fruit Eve convinced Adam to taste with an apple tree because of a certain translation mistake related to the word malum? Don't know how common this ...
5
votes
1answer
75 views

A textbook for Latin

What would be the one book recommendation you'd definitely give an individual interested in learning Latin? The individual would like the book to include a good overview of Latin at the very least; ...
8
votes
1answer
75 views

About Sappho Edmonds 89 Campbell 48

General background What I gather from Edmonds is that the fragment at hand is found in a letter written by Iulianus (Julian the Apostate?) to Iamblichus, and the "offending" part of the letter reads ...
7
votes
2answers
54 views

Translating “From Man to Woman” into Latin

I want to title a poem "From Man to Woman" in the sense, addressed to woman, by man. While starting the poem, I had the phrase ad hominem/ad feminam in mind. My knowledge of Latin ends there. Google ...
5
votes
2answers
56 views

Translating “do the next thing” to Latin

I would like to use the phrase "do the next thing" as a motto for some literature. Does the translation FACITE DEINDE REM work? The thought is basically this: we should get active with the next thing ...
5
votes
3answers
124 views

Why nominative instead of accusative with verb “sum”?

Recently I've been learning about the accusative mode, in/direct objects and in/transitive verbs. In light of this, consider the phrase: Nilus fluvius est I'm interested in the rationale (...
2
votes
0answers
51 views

How the Greek word “oikonomia” got meaning of “thrift”?

Some dictionaries seems to include the word "thrift" at the end of definition for oikonomia (good examples here and here): Greek oikonomia "household management, thrift. I would like to know the ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

How was iī pronounced?

Most of the time, Latin doesn't allow two instances of the same vowel next to each other: forms like *mee (from meus) are replaced with alternatives like mī. However, in I-stem second nouns, the ...
4
votes
0answers
28 views

Seeking simple Latin translation for motto “fire, flow, transcendence”

I am in a community of flow artists and fire performers. I'm putting together a "coat of arms" of sorts for this community, and would like to include a motto in Latin. The motto in English would be ...
4
votes
2answers
30 views

How can I say “passion for healing” in Latin?

Have no idea here. I translated it on google but yeah it's not that trustworthy I know. Somehow I found out the word "passio","ad" and "sanationem". We are going to use it as our school of medicine ...
6
votes
1answer
91 views

Latin Bibles (other than Vulgata) available as text?

Is it possible to find the text online of any of the Bibles/NT's in the list below? I fetched the "text only" option of Beza's NT from archive.org, but the amount of typos is considerable :( Theodore ...
8
votes
2answers
36 views

What is a good deed?

Suppose I wanted to talk about good deeds. Generally this means acts done by someone for selfless reasons, solely to benefit others. For a literal translation I could go with bona facta, but the ...
5
votes
1answer
85 views

Regarding the mode of “terram” in Deuteronomy 28:38

Deuteronomy 28:38 reads: Sementem multam jacies in terram, et modicum congregabis: quia locustæ devorabunt omnia. I think the first phrase before the comma has the following structure (but ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

Why was 'verecundiam' adopted to signify Appeal to Authority?

Walton, Douglas. Informal Logic: A Pragmatic Approach (2 ed 2008). p. 210 Middle.   The phrase argumentum ad verecundiam literally means “the argument from modesty,” and it was John Locke who ...
4
votes
1answer
67 views

Translating: “Christ Jesus Ultimate King & Ruler for All Time”

I have considered that this may be stated: "Christī Regēns", emphasising with a capital R and being pronounced actively ruling. Is this sufficient to state? I wonder that is is not more like, "...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

Translating “Blood isn't always thicker than water.”

My step grandpa passed, and I want a tattoo in latin that says, "Blood isn't always thicker than water." I would greatly appreciate it if someone translates this.
6
votes
1answer
38 views

How might I write a latin phrase for swapping bodies?

Putting together a small literary piece where an item is inscribed with a Latin phrase that hints that it can be used to swap bodies (or minds, depending, I suppose, on your perspective) with another ...
4
votes
3answers
992 views

Why is an accusative mode needed?

Consider Deuteronomy 28:30, in the Vulgata: Uxorem accipias, et alius dormiat cum ea. Domum ædifices, et non habites in ea. Plantes vineam, et non vindemies eam. So uxorem, domum, vineam, and eam ...
6
votes
1answer
61 views

Quōmodo verba “in my opinion” Latīnē loquī?

In colloquial English (particularly in online discourse) the phrase "in my opinion" (often abbreviated as "imo/IMO") is quite common. I am wondering how one might express this in an idiomatic manner ...
5
votes
1answer
62 views

Consecutive ablatives

Consider the phrase I met in Rome with a friend As far as I know, "in Rome" and "with a friend" both represent the ablative case in Latin. Thus, the above could be translated as convēnī Rōmā ...
6
votes
1answer
89 views

Does this text make sense?

I am writing a text to be sung by a small chorus for a recording, and I need a check on my Latin use, as I'm a less active student of the language than others, and don't entirely trust myself to nail ...
12
votes
5answers
1k views

What does “Vivos voco pedibus ioco” mean?

I am not familiar with Latin, but I found an engraving on a bench at the graveyard, that made me curious. It says, vivos voco pedibus ioco. Google Translate is not really helpful, as it ...
5
votes
0answers
49 views

What does Geryon have to do with singing?

One of the Labors of Heracles involved a three-headed giant named Geryon (Γηρυών). I've never seen an explanation for this name, but at first glance it would seem to be connected to γηρύω "to sing" (...
6
votes
1answer
66 views

On Declensions and Gender

after advancing on German gramatically as my second foreign language, I wanted to pursue my interest in Latin. Grammar seemed to me pretty straightforward, yet so many to memorize. I'm self-teaching ...
6
votes
2answers
105 views

In: Ablative or accusative

In chapter 4 LLPSI it says "sacculum suum in mensa ponit". Ponit means put or sets, so indicates a movement. As far as I know in in Latin in the meaning of into or onto (as is the case here) takes the ...
1
vote
0answers
31 views

Quispiam, quisquam, quivis, quidam, quilibet?

Including the variations with qualis, quantus and quotus, is there a specific rule to when to use each these undefined pronouns?
6
votes
4answers
153 views

What's the translation of this Medieval document?

This is a page taken from a medieval breviary from 13th century Italy Found this document at The Antiquarium in Houston. Would like to know what it is describing. Translations as well as paraphrases ...
4
votes
1answer
52 views

What exactly are βροτολοιγῶ?

From Procopius's Secret History (or Arcana Historia) XII.12-14: Διὸ δὴ ἐμοί τε καὶ τοῖς πολλοῖς ἠμῶν οὐδεπώποτε ἔδοξαν οὗτοι ἄνθρωποι εἶναι, ἀλλὰ δαίμονες παλαμναῖοί τινες καὶ ὥσπερ οἱ ποιηταὶ ...
9
votes
3answers
178 views

Why νώ (rather than νῶ) from νόω? (Greek)

Consider these masculine nominative singular and masculine nominative dual forms: νοῦς, νώ κανοῦν, κανώ μνᾶ, μνᾶ γῆ, γᾶ I understand that the circumflex in these forms represents an acute ...
4
votes
2answers
259 views

“Felix est rex is quem omnes cives amant”. Is the pronoun “is” necessary?

Considering the original phrase: The king who all citizens love is happy. (Portuguese: Feliz é o rei a quem todos os cidadãos amam.) Here is a proposed Latin translation: Felix est rex ...
5
votes
1answer
51 views

Ubī egō verbō “queō” prō “possum” ūtar?

The word queō ("I am able") is back-formed from nequeō ("I am not able") and, to the best of my knowledge, is equivalent in meaning to possum. When would one use queō over possum, or vice versa?
6
votes
2answers
74 views

Translating: “Know and understand this king. Be sure that you make yourself a disciple of Christ the ruling King.”

I am trying to write a motto and my knowledge of Latin is not very profound. I wish to state using Latin to the effect of, and using king rather than man: Know and understand this king. Be sure ...
10
votes
1answer
112 views

What is the logic behind the order of the cases

Most English books of Latin use the order used by Charles E. Bennett: Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Accusative, Vocative, Ablative. But most French books use the following order: Nominative, ...

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