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-2 votes
0 answers
16 views

words meaning girl

On Google translate, I saw so many words which mean girl. Could you tell me the difference and relation between these words?
  • 265
-2 votes
1 answer
16 views

What does "gallus" mean in English?

I want to know what the latin name for "chicken" means after it is translated into English. gallus gallus domesticus In Mexico (🇲🇽), the name is "Gallo" Ques es la significa de ...
3 votes
1 answer
93 views

Is there something special about "corpus"?

Metamorphoses Book V, the story of Proserpina. At this point Ceres has just thrown some soup in an impertinent man's face and turned him into a lizard (as you do). mirantem flentemque et tangere ...
3 votes
1 answer
81 views

Is GPT's Latin significantly better than Google Translate?

Google Translate is notoriously bad at Latin. I am very bad at Latin myself and when I tried to converse with the GPT chatbot in Latin, it had to frequently correct the mistakes in my questions. From ...
3 votes
0 answers
52 views

What is a Latin phrase expressing the same idea as the English phrase "I know, right?"

In English, the phrase "I know, right?" Is a rhetorical question used to indicate that the speaker is in full agreement with the statement just made by a conversational partner. E.g.: ...
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0 votes
1 answer
34 views

Transalte "If you can breathe, you can fight" [duplicate]

My son is headed to the Naval Academy and I am trying to engrave something in Latin. The phrase is "If you can breathe, you can fight" Any help is appreciated...!
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5 votes
3 answers
558 views

'booklover' in latin

How would you say booklover or bookworm in latin. It is for a tattoo. The person who wants it is a real booklover and wants the world to know. He is not a collector of books but a reader. I find ...
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1 vote
0 answers
46 views

How to address politely in Latin

I wonder how to address politely someone in the terms of: "How are you Mr. Cesar" In Spanish (and Latin derived), they use the respectful form, "usted, vous..." Question How to ...
1 vote
0 answers
53 views

All the time in latin?

What's the difference between "omne tempus" and "omni tempore"? I'm really confused because I can't see the "time how long" by the accusative and the "time when"...
  • 451
6 votes
1 answer
149 views

Can a gerund have a predicative complement?

Can a gerund have a predicative complement? By predicative complement I mean a complement which refers both to a noun or pronoun (the subject or the direct object) and to the verb, like e.g. "...
5 votes
2 answers
98 views

How is this translation of "the immutable system engenders rot"?

My sentence is "the immutable system engenders rot." Diagramming the English sentence: immutable: adjective, modifying the subject system: noun, subject. in context, refers to the system in ...
  • 153
8 votes
1 answer
120 views

What are the types of hair in latin?

What would be the adjectives to describe someone's hair? The only I know is "crispus" "curled" Could i just translate the adjectives in English into latin? Straight hair= capillus ...
  • 451
6 votes
3 answers
1k views

"Semitic languages" in Classical Latin

The term semiticus is attested in Rudimenta linguae Hebraicae (C. H. Vosen, 1883) but I am more interested in Classical Latin. In English, the expression "Syro-Arabian languages" is ...
  • 195
6 votes
0 answers
129 views

Cethegus (...) recitatis litteris debilitatus atque abiectus conscientia repente conticuit. (Cic. Catil. 3, 10)

I was wondering about the correct/preferred syntactic analysis of recitatis litteris in the following complex sentence from Cicero. Tum Cethegus, qui paulo ante aliquid tamen de gladiis ac sicis, ...
  • 6,790
2 votes
1 answer
47 views

generatio = childbirth or also education/raising of children?

Generatio means "a begetting", but does that include the whole process of conceiving, bearing, birthing, and educating the child?
  • 3,208
2 votes
2 answers
99 views

Was the Greek preposition "ἀνά" used in Latin?

A dictionary says that "ana tres uncias" was used by the Roman doctor Celsus. I googled this and didn't find anything. Was this Greek preposition used in Latin?
  • 451
3 votes
2 answers
275 views

I would like help with a translation for “remember your purpose” or something similar

After a particularly painful life shakeup, I want a tattoo that reminds me every day what I am supposed to do going forward. I would like it to be “remember your purpose” or “remember why” or ...
3 votes
1 answer
95 views

Tool for identifying unique words and sorting by frequency?

There are various useful dictionary tools, like Dickinson's College Latin Core Vocabulary, which gives you the top 1000 Latin words (not sure what corpus they're using, but I assume it's one that's ...
  • 667
6 votes
1 answer
378 views

Can a noun be qualified by two juxtaposed adjectives?

I read online (I'm sorry, I can't remember where) that if two adjectives refer to the same noun, you have to use a conjunction like "et" or "-que". Socrates sapiens senex vir est. ...
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3 votes
2 answers
113 views

Translation of 'time' to Latin?

Google gives the word 'Tempus' and 'Aevum' but they seem like they mean moment and age. Is there a more appropriate translation for the word 'Time,' definition of: "the indefinite continued ...
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6 votes
1 answer
402 views

Is there a latin root for Romanian thank you (“mulțumesc”)?

The Romanian language has a particular word to express “thank you”. This word appears composite and direct translation of Latin. Phonetically I find it identical if not peculiarly close to “mult sum ...
  • 161
6 votes
2 answers
856 views

Why is domui dative in 1 Timothy 3:4?

1 Tim 3:4 in the vulgate is: suae domui bene praepositum: filios habentem subditos cum omni castitate The DRC1752 renders this into English as: One that ruleth well his own house, having his ...
  • 667
9 votes
1 answer
326 views

Use of reflexive pronoun in passive periphrastic constructions

As I understand it: the reflexive pronoun is used when the object of a sentence relates to the subject e.g. puer cor suum sequitur - the boy follows his (own) heart. to convey a meaning of ...
  • 343
7 votes
1 answer
151 views

Quid aliud edam?

A semi-sated lower-class Roman stands in front of the pantry and mutters to themselves: "What else could I eat?" What would be the most natural or idiomatic way of expressing this sentiment? ...
  • 171
5 votes
1 answer
305 views

Is there a latin helper word that can used with infinitives (and implies that the subsequent word may be an infinitive)?

As I'm working on vocabulary, I'm doing all I can on my flashcards to stay "in Latin" as much as possible (as opposed to English translations), and also to use as much "natural" ...
  • 667
6 votes
0 answers
57 views

Principles of forming epic poem titles from words

Could someone point me to a reliable source towards how are the -ας/-ις/etc. suffixes are applied to form the titles of epic poems? For example, why Ίλιον > Ἰλιάς but Ἀχιλλεύς > Ἀχιλληΐς, and ...
12 votes
3 answers
953 views

What's the difference between aster, stella, sidus and astrum in Latin?

aster, stella, sidus and astrum are are all nearly means or related to stars. But are there any key differences between these words ?
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10 votes
1 answer
1k views

How can I translate the names of the Proto-Indo-European gods and goddesses into Latin?

What would be the best Latin translation of the following two main Proto-Indo-European gods? *Dyḗws Ph₂tḗr (sky father) *Dʰéǵʰōm Méh₂tēr (earth mother) I would like to use words directly derived ...
  • 113
8 votes
0 answers
90 views

How is Conradus de Mure's Latin poem on parchment-making to be understood?

In a few different sources, I have found this poem on parchment-making attributed to Conradus de Mure. It is mostly intelligible, but several parts are obscure to me, either because of the language or ...
  • 5,722
4 votes
2 answers
185 views

Times in latin: in 4 hours, at 4, until 4, from 4

How do I refer to certain hours, like for example: *In 4 hours = (in) quattuor hora Here I would use ablative with 'in' *Until 4 o clock = ad quattuor horam Here I would use accusative due to 'ad' ...
  • 205
6 votes
1 answer
874 views

Aristotle's "Man is a political/social animal" original Greek words

The following sentence by Artistotle is well-known: Man is a political/social animal. His original words are: διότι δὲ πολιτικὸν ὁ ἄνθρωπος ζῷον πάσης μελίττης καὶ παντὸς ἀγελαίου ζῴου μᾶλλον, ...
  • 163
5 votes
2 answers
452 views

Meaning of "semper de"

In Ørberg's "Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata" in capitulo XIX on p. 149 it says, "Propter amorem nocte vix dormiebam - semper de te cogitabam..." "Because of love I could ...
7 votes
1 answer
71 views

Are there suggested cases that Latin poets deliberately sometimes used stress (accent) to induce certain effect?

Latin Hexameter poetry, like Greek, is quantity based. When we consider the rhythm, we have ictus at the beginning of each of the six feet. However Latin is also a stress-based language which fact ...
  • 8,547
4 votes
1 answer
231 views

What is the best translation for "livestreaming"?

I am looking for a brief and accurate expression to say "livestreaming" in Latin. Classical or New Latin style, or coined word are all okay. Are there any options?
5 votes
2 answers
225 views

Parallel examples of the change of Apothēca to boutique?

French boutique, Spanish bodega etc. are by etymology said to be from Latin apothēca (REW). Are there other cases of word-initial a- being lost in Romance languages? From the top of my head, words ...
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9 votes
1 answer
927 views

Why does canis have both masculine and feminine forms?

Most nouns in Latin (and e.g. Spanish) have only one gender. Some other have two (epicene nouns). canis is one example (Separate Q: are there more examples?) I wonder why is that the case for canis. ...
  • 12.2k
7 votes
0 answers
102 views

Understanding a passage from Frontinus

I recently read the following complaint from Sex. Iulius Frontinus, who was made curator aquarum (supervisor of the aquaeducts) in 97 and later wrote a comprehensive work on the City's water supply (...
14 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is there a word for ephemeral but meaning lasting one night?

Looking for a word like "ephemeral," which is derived from Latin "ephēmeros," meaning "lasting only a day," according to the Oxford Dictionary of English. However, I'd ...
8 votes
2 answers
134 views

"nemo aliquid facit nisi qui" + indicative or subjunctive

In another question, a reference was given to Varro: De subus nemini ignotum, nisi qui apros non putat sues vocari. which was translated as: As to swine, everybody knows — except those who think ...
  • 8,547
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

Conjuring daemons -- a fictive modern formula

In it's "City of ..." book series (p. 300, I don't have the book name) Cassandra Clare let a person speak the formula "Quod tumeraris: per Jehovam, Gehennam et consecratam aquam quam ...
4 votes
1 answer
109 views

Translating command "Be of highest value!" to Latin for jewelery engraving

What is the most accurate translation for the command "Be of highest value!"? The meaning of the phrase is to behave as someone who brings out the best in others. As in, be the highest value ...
6 votes
3 answers
665 views

What are "ferae pecudes"?

In De Rerum Natura (I.14): Inde ferae pecudes persultant pabula laeta et rapidos tranant amnis ... In their commentary William Leonard & ‎Stanley Barney Smith provide three suggestions: ferae: &...
  • 8,547
5 votes
3 answers
2k views

How can I say "We shall want for nothing" in Latin?

Could someone advise how I might translate "We shall want for nothing" into Latin? I'm struggling to find an online translator that isn't gibberish and my own attempt is even worse!
6 votes
1 answer
363 views

Are plural Latin participles sometimes translated singular? E.g., "peregratis" in Acts 19:1

Acts 19:1 in the Vulgate is: Factum est autem cum Apollo esset Corinthi, ut Paulus peragratis superioribus partibus veniret Ephesum, et inveniret quosdam discipulos If I'm parsing peregratis ...
  • 667
6 votes
1 answer
173 views

Unexpected long vowels in Plautus before a word-final T

In a comment to my answer on a vowel length question, Vincent Krebs pointed out that Plautus does not follow the classical rules that I laid out: Plautus does not always shorten the vowel before -t. ...
2 votes
1 answer
353 views

"Habemus dicentis"?

The headline on electoral-vote.com this morning is Habemus Dicentis, playing on Habemus Papam ("We have a pope") to announce the selection of Kevin McCarthy as Speaker of the U.S. House of ...
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7 votes
1 answer
318 views

What would be the appropriate translation for "Dedicated to my father, may he rest in peace"

I have a translation question. Normally, I would use Google, but I am hoping immortalize it in my M.S. thesis, so I wanted to be sure about the correct translation for "Dedicated to my father, ...
4 votes
1 answer
196 views

On a Quote from St. Gregory and the Contextual Meaning of the Word `Operator'

Contained in St. Alphonsus Liguori's Dignity and Duties of the Priest or Selva, one finds the following passage in the section on "Sanctity Necessary for the Priest": But St. Bernard says, ...
2 votes
1 answer
47 views

Is this really a nominativus cum infinitivo? "Parentes adire…prohibentur"

This worksheet by Robin Meyer offers the following sentence as an example of a nominativus cum infinitivo: Parentes adire ad filios prohibentur. (Cic. Ver. 2.5, 117)Parents were prohibited to see ...
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-1 votes
0 answers
86 views

Latin Word for "thing that is becoming" "thing in becoming"

Is there are word for a "thing that is becoming" in Latin?
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