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Ethics of Spinoza - est ut

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 33, Scholium 2: Quare non est ut in hoc absurdo refutando tempus consumam. William White translates it: Therefore it is not worthwhile that I should waste time ...
1
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1answer
52 views

When you finish “lingua latina per se illustrata” can you understand latin books easily?

As It is said in title, when you finish "lingua latina per se illustrata" by Hans H. Ørberg How much can you understand a latin manuscript? Or should one follow some other books after it?
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0answers
24 views

Incorrect Google translations of Thumb and Fingers in Latin - request for “correct” answers

I have a little familiarity with Latin, but Google Translate contradicts my expectations. thumb <---> abductor pollicis first finger <---> flexor hallucis second finger <---> digitus ...
2
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2answers
92 views

6 types of person in verb or 3?

People always say that there 6 types of person in the conjugation of a verb: I he, she, it you (single) we you (plural) they Somehow there is another group of people say that there are only 3 ...
4
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1answer
74 views

Translation of a passage

In a book that I'm reading, a passage form Johann Gottlieb Heineccius is referred to illustrate the difference between codicilli and epistolae (the last paragraph [starting: "unde recte"] is ...
-2
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1answer
76 views

Help with a translation into Classical Latin

How would I say the phrase "Retaliate with Success" in classical Latin?
12
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2answers
5k views

Feminine case 3rd-person version of “Veni, vidi, vici”

How does the famous saying: Veni, vidi, vici. have to be changed so that it describes a female person, such as in English: She came, she saw, she conquered. Reversing Google Translate gives ...
1
vote
1answer
29 views

Pronunciation of genitive proper-name epithets, e.g. Euonymus fortunei

What customs do the various Latin pronunciations have for pronouncing species epithets that are the genitive form of someone's name, e.g. Euonymus fortunei, named for Robert Fortune? In the English ...
3
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0answers
45 views

If we say worship is only for God which latin word should we use for worship?

Latria is defined as that worship which is due only to God, unlike other forms of veneration (such as to the Virgin Mary or Saints) which is called Dulia and Hyperdulia. All three, I think, are forms ...
5
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2answers
87 views

What is a “rough draft” in Latin?

Suppose I'm preparing a speech for the Senate floor, and I want to make sure it sounds just right before I present it. So I come up with a rough draft, then revise it several times until I'm satisfied ...
2
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1answer
59 views

Future infinitive active in indirect discourse

The future infinitive active can be used as an active periphrastic, but within an indirect discourse, of which the subject is an accusative and the main verb an infinitive, can it also have a future ...
2
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0answers
89 views

Can 'quod' refer to the previous speaker?

It is quite common to start a Latin sentence with quod, referring to the matter discussed in the previous sentence. In a dialogue, can one use it to refer to the previous thing even if it was uttered ...
8
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2answers
559 views

what does the abbreviation “h. l.” (or “h. 1.”) stand for?

In one of the footnotes in Popma's book, we read: Vocabulum hocce in genere neutro h. l. esse positum, testatur Erythraeus in Ind. Virgil. fol. 41. fac. 2. col b. I could not find Erythraeu's book ...
7
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1answer
84 views

What are popular fonts for polytonic Greek?

There are quite a lot of fonts available for writing Latin, which have been designed for easy legibility and contain all the letters of the Latin alphabet. For the Greek alphabet, however, most modern ...
4
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2answers
62 views

A noun meaning “survivor”

I am looking for a noun meaning "survivor". It looks like the closest in meaning is the adjective superstes. Can that be used as a noun, and if so how do you decline it? Per the post on ...
6
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1answer
118 views

What evidence is there for the classical pronunciation of zeta?

As I learned it back in introductory Greek, there's significant debate in the classics community about whether Classical Greek Ζ was pronounced /dz/, /zd/, /zz/, or something else. What evidence is ...
2
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1answer
46 views

Comparisons in Latin- does this make sense?

Here is my sentence: I'm trying to say that "The gods seemed to favor Romulus because he saw 12 vultures, twice the number of birds that Remus saw." Dii Romulō favere visi sunt quia ille ...
1
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2answers
63 views

Does trisyllabic laxing occur in Latin words like 'decision' before entering English?

There's a phenomenon called Trisyllabic laxing where the vowel in a stressed syllable is shortened if two (or more) syllables follow. If the stressed vowel is in at least* the penultimate syllable (...
3
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1answer
88 views

Difference between geminus and gemellus

Both geminus and gemellus seem to have similar meanings: twin-born, born together, twins. Is the main difference between these two words how they were used, or did they have additional meanings that ...
3
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3answers
102 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...
3
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0answers
49 views

Did Romulus and Remus have other names?

Throughout Classical times, Romans would often have several names: one person might be identified by praenomen, nomen gentilicum, cognomen, agnomen, signum, and patronymic, all together. Were Roman ...
6
votes
1answer
150 views

Do neuter plural nouns ever take singular verbs in Latin?

In Greek, it's well-known that neuter plural subjects take singular verb forms. This seems to be an old Indo-European feature, as it shows up in e.g. Anatolian languages as well. Does this feature ...
1
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0answers
43 views

Eppur si muove word-to-word translation [closed]

It is translated on wikipedia as "Yet it moves", Galileo Galile's words against court. But If we translate it word-to-word what does it mean?
2
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0answers
32 views

Semantic difference between genitive and “belong-to” adjectives

There is class of adjectives that their meaning is "belong to" "pertain to" like grammaticus. (maybe that distinction is somewhat artificial, as one can say that magnus is "...
3
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1answer
151 views

Agreement and possessive genitive

What we do in the following example? I need to combine two words in a phrase: 'professional' and 'holiday'. There is no adjective 'professional' in Latin or my searching is bad. So I can use the ...
2
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2answers
104 views

Translate “self-made” into both an adjective and a noun

I'm looking to translate the phrase "self-made" into an adjective and a noun. Unlike the English phrase where "made" doesn't mean you literally made yourself, in this case I want ...
3
votes
1answer
44 views

English translation of a philosophical quote from Spinoza in Latin

Notandum, dari necessario unius cujusque rei existentis certam aliquam CAUSAM, propter quam existit. Et notandum, hanc causam, propter quam aliqua res existit, vel debere contineri in ipsa natura et ...
1
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1answer
84 views

Which modern language is more similar to classical latin?

Since Spanish, Italian and French languages are all romance languages and which one of them is the most similar one to classical latin language? Is it Italian? (Rationally maybe?) EDIT1: I found this ...
6
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2answers
337 views

How can we distinguish “Si vis pacem, para bellum” translations?

On Wikipedia it is said that Si vis pacem, para bellum means "If you want peace, prepare for war". But I think that It also seems like "If you want peace, prepare war". What makes ...
5
votes
1answer
150 views

Translating a short sentence to Latin

I want to translate the following sentence to Latin: 'And this concludes our journey.' Here 'this' refers to the preceding text. The sentence could be paraphrased as, 'And this is the end of our ...
7
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0answers
64 views

Is there a pre-Christian Roman story of “coming to faith”?

Is there a story in the Roman literature of someone previously not believing in the traditional Roman gods or a specific deity within their pantheon but later, after a vision or another experience, ...
6
votes
1answer
152 views

Ethics of Spinoza: producendam

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 33, Scholium 1: res aliqua impossibilis dicitur; nimirum quia vel ipsius essentia seu definitio contradictionem involvit vel quia nulla causa externa datur ad ...
5
votes
4answers
109 views

Forming compound word using “Cognitio”

Based on the existing English words describing the diet type of a species with Latin origins, I am struggling to see a clear pattern... Herbivore: "Herba" + "-vore(vorare)"? ...
2
votes
1answer
67 views

Is “tribuo” derrived from “tribus” or vice versa?

According to Wiktionary, the verb tribuo comes from tribus. But further search led me to this etymological dictionary, which in turn cites Forcelleni on those two entries; On tribuo Forcelleni writes ...
4
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2answers
153 views

request for translation from Latin to English

I saw following text on the back of a T-shirt: Crux sacra sit mihi lux Non draco sit mihi dux Vade retro Satana, Numquam suade mihi vana Sunt mala quae libas, Ipse venena bibas Image of the print: ...
3
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0answers
69 views

What fresh hell is this?

“What fresh hell is this?” is a question frequently uttered (or so it has been reported) by writer Dorothy Parker, on such occasions as when the doorbell or the telephone rang, expressing her ...
7
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2answers
1k views

“Tu quoque, Brutus, mi fili?” Grammar question

Someone told me these were Caesar's actual last words. Google confirms this. But I can't find an explanation for what looks to me like weird grammar. First of all, shouldn't "Brutus" be &...
2
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0answers
25 views

What are the meanings of servus and minister in ecclesiatical latin?

Reading the answers to another question I thought about the meaning of servus and minister in christian/ecclesiastical latin. It seems to me that in classical latin servus related clearly to the legal ...
2
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2answers
89 views

How do I say, “In pursuit of Truth, Beauty, and Goodness”?

I know "Truth, Beauty, Goodness" is "Veritas, Bonitas, Pulcritudo." But do I need an "et" before "Pulcritudo"? When do you use and's in Latin? And how would ...
7
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2answers
768 views

What is the meaning of “the new darkness” in Latin?

I am looking for a Latin phrase for The new darkness as in the arising of a negative political movement, a "new" darkness. The best I can find is tenebrae ex hodiernae as if "born ...
1
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0answers
34 views

Romans and Ancient Greek language [duplicate]

Is there evidence in the inscriptions, that Romans have realised, that Hellenic languages are very close to theirs own language!? It seems to be that the distinguish was applied to the Etruscan ...
4
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0answers
42 views

Trying to get a three-word phrase correct

In my job I am asked to put a figure (for the time a job will take) on pieces of work (complex software), for the Sales department to then convince customers to buy. Often the Sales department come ...
4
votes
2answers
211 views

Sentence translation “ … videat, annon implacabilem Deum quoque sit experturus”

In De differentiis verborum, under the entry of Clemens, Pompa contrasts that word with placidus, and right afterwards writes: Sed implacidus, qui nullo placamine ad placabilitatem promovetur, ut se ...
5
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4answers
394 views

Translation for “Humbly yours in Christ”

I am trying to find the correct translation for, "humbly yours in Christ" to put at the end of a letter. Would the translation "humilitate tua in Christo" be somewhat close? I have ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

What does “tom. i.” mean?

I'm seeing the following abbreviation in several book/manuscript citations, particularly in religious works, but I have no idea what the abbreviation means. From the context of where I'm finding it, I'...
5
votes
2answers
105 views

What is the best Greek word for a thrown knife?

In the Netflix show The Umbrella Academy, one character has a limited form of telekinesis: he can manipulate the movement of knives that he throws. If I wanted to give this ability a pretentious Greek ...
3
votes
0answers
30 views

Ascend “by”, should it be ablative?

In music, a "comma" is a rough unit of intonation. If I were to refer to a refrain which had globally ascended a comma compared to the previous time it occurred, does it make sense that it ...
7
votes
1answer
842 views

Olympic oath : The crown or death (?)

In a Wikipedia article about the Olympics, I read the following sentence (my translation) Finally, the pleasure of participating is alien to the Greek ideal, for which only victory is worth winning, &...
4
votes
1answer
84 views

Translating “to care for each other” into Latin

I have a friend. She and I have strong loyalties to each other -- we have a semi-unspoken agreement to be always forthright with and always supportive of one another, and I want to express this ...
4
votes
5answers
239 views

“lovesick” = ? in Latin

How does one say "lovesick" in Latin? It's "malato d'amore" in Italian. Is it "malus amoris"? Or would that mean more "malicious love"?

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