Questions tagged [grammar-choice]

When asking which choice (case, tense, mood etc.) is grammatical in a given situation, use this tag.

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5
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2answers
118 views

Satis est: de quadam re aut cuiusdam rei?

"Satis est!" significare potest aliquid sufficere vel ob quandam causam saturatum esse ("Iam satis est! Tace!"), ut Anglice dicitur "enough!". Si autem causa exponenda ...
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0answers
105 views

Don't pay the ferryman, until ... future perfect?

Recently I read that Charon was a portitor, i.e., a ferryman. This got me thinking about the phrase "Don't pay the ferryman until he gets you to the other side" (Chris de Burgh, 1982) and ...
7
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1answer
92 views

How would you express 'drained of' in Latin?

I'm trying to translate the phrase 'drained of' in Latin, for example in the sentence 'I have been drained of all my energy'. All of the words for draining which I have found work more in the sense of ...
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0answers
29 views

Preposition preceding a verb [duplicate]

i came across this sentence in Orberg's book: "Quid inest in saccis?" Or "Ecce iulius ad villam advenit." My question is that why there are aditional prepositions, namely another &...
5
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1answer
72 views

Can two nouns be used together as a single unit in Latin?

In French, especially in philosophy and mathematics, it is quite common [1] to use two nouns with a hyphen for certain concepts in order to distinguish between several definitions of the same word. ...
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17 views

Could you review my translation? [duplicate]

The original song lyrics I'm translating can be found here:https://genius.com/Avicii-city-lights-lyrics This is how I translated it. Could you help me improve it, please? Lūcēs urbis, tollite mē. Iam ...
10
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1answer
340 views

“Hic” or “hīc”?

The pronoun hic (this) is written with short i in many places, e.g. Oxford Latin Dictionary. But in Lewis & Short: Latin-English dictionary and Allen and Greenough's New Latin Grammar, it is ...
4
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2answers
131 views

If you do something long enough

In my answer to this recent question, I translated "when you look long into the abyss, the abyss also looks into you" as: si diu voraginem intuitus eris, etiam vorago te intuebitur. That is, ...
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1answer
46 views

What is the correct way to show the Passive Perfect Infinitive in a textbook?

I have come across the Passive Perfect Infinitive and my current textbook represents it as a nomative participle + esse (e.g. salutatus esse). However on the internet I mostly see it represented as an ...
5
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1answer
128 views

Why is the neuter perniciosius used in this sentence?

In Confessions (1.18.29), Augustine writes: quasi vero quemlibet inimicum hominem perniciosius sentiat quam ipsum odium quo in eum inritatur, aut vastet quisquam persequendo alium gravius quam cor ...
6
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1answer
230 views

Short form for "collige, virgo, rosas"

I've never studied Latin, so probably I'm asking a trivial question. I'm wondering if the phrase "collige, virgo, rosas" can be expressed correctly in the following short form "collige ...
4
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1answer
204 views

It was by no means in vain that I came to Rome

I wanted to ask this some time ago, but assumed that it would be dismissed as "fatuous". To my gratification, Joonas has blazed the trail with his excellent Q: Did the Romans use 'animus&...
6
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3answers
243 views

Is it possible to have an imperative feel without using the imperative form of a verb?

In English, we can have a sentence that doesn't include a verb but is taken as a directive. Consider the following phrase from the HBO television show, Carnivale: Every prophet in his house. In the ...
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2answers
122 views

'Concepturus' and 'nasciturus' in legal terminology

When speaking of the rights of and refering to the one to be conceived in Law we use "concepturus" Which is the future active participle. If we wanted to correctly speak of and refer to the ...
5
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2answers
317 views

How are the objects of comparatives handled grammatically?

I am doing some Latin exercises and the sentences are given as the following (by Rosetta Stone): Puer plus lactis habet quam vir. Femina plures canes habet quam vir. In the first case ("more ...
7
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1answer
140 views

Which preposition should be used with contrario and why?

Is it better to say argumentum a/ab contrario or e/ex contrario? It seems that both are acceptable but in most Romance languages it is a contrario. The movement out/from is not clear/explicit/graphic ...
6
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1answer
830 views

Caesar's use of 'ad equum'

Caesar uses 'ad equum' to mean 'turning them into horses'. This is a famous quote used in OLD itself. Is this an idiom? There is no reference to 'converso' or 'mutatum'... just 'ad' although habiturum ...
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0answers
52 views

How would you describe someone as being completely alone?

If I wanted a very succinct way to say some person or thing was completely alone, how would I say this in Classical Latin? For example, if someone was drifting far out in the void of space where they ...
3
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1answer
82 views

What is the Role of "hoc" in Cicero's de oratore 2.25.108?

In Q: Why Does Cicero use the Third-Person Singular Instead of the Plural Form?, the following extract from Cicero's de oratore 2.25.108 was studied: "...in quibus hoc praecipit ratio et ...
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1answer
518 views

Plural of axis mundi

The phrase axis mundi is used frequently in archaeology and art history to describe certain places as a "world center" or "center of the universe" in Indigenous or ancient/...
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2answers
109 views

how to express "indefinite distributive numerals" ("several dollars each")? is aliquoteni classical?

In answer to the question Quotiens? (How many times), one can respond with aliquotiens (several times). But for the question Quoteni? (How many of each), can he come up with aliquoteni? For I can't ...
3
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2answers
545 views

A Latin motto for SpaceX

Jeff Bezos company Blue Origin has a motto “Gradatim Ferociter” or Step by Step Ferociously, although they seem to take a very long time to do anything. Elon Musk also runs a rocket company (SpaceX). ...
4
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1answer
67 views

What is the closest translation of "commeruero" to English?

My working understanding is best expressed as "I will have fully earned", with "commeruero" being the first-person singular future perfect active indicative form of commereo. If I ...
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1answer
713 views

Writing "I'm proud of myself"

I came up with "mihi superbus sum" with "mihi" as the Dative form of ego for "of myself", "superbus" for "proud", and "sum" for "I'm&...
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90 views

How to say "no one is worth to be believed (to) easily" with dignus+ supine?

The u-supine can connect with dignus like: Nihil dignum dictu actum his consulibus (Livy; nothing worth saying/of mentioning was done ..) But when I tried to use this pattern to say: "No one is ...
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1answer
325 views

Is the word order of "Iura novit curia" used for emphasis?

Is the change in the word order used for emphasis, and how would we translate "iura novit curia" to English while maintaining the word order? We don't have cases and there is the danger of ...
11
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1answer
931 views

Which is more correct, "status quo" or "statu quo"?

I always heard and read the expression "status quo" but I just found the alternative spelling "statu quo" in the Italian translation of Motivational Interviewing by Miller e ...
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3answers
874 views

Why is Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum in the feminine?

I often consult a website called Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum of Latin writings on music theory and practice. Note that the web address changes every couple of years. Why "musicarum latinarum&...
3
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1answer
69 views

Is there a general method for creating an adjective from a noun?

In an answer to making an adjective from a noun, Joonas mentions that creating adjectives from nouns is not a trivial matter and gives a solution to making an adjective out of chicken for an ...
2
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1answer
84 views

Verb + dative/ablative-supine

According to A&G, the ablative supine with verbs is "extremely rare" and even the example given: pudet dictu is somewhat not regular since pudet is impersonal (as if it is almost an ...
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3answers
627 views

Adapting Cato's motto for today

I need some help with the grammar here, I'm interested in learning Latin so I have been lurking around here for a bit, but I haven't really started, yet. (Well, I have had a couple of false starts). I ...
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0answers
64 views

How to express shared ownership of several individuals

The distinction between shared ownership and private ownership of individuals is well illustrated in Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style: If Jeanette has some pencils and ...
2
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1answer
80 views

Which Case is Governed by Verb Obsto/ Obstare?

Continuing from Q: What is the Role of "Quid" in "ne quid obstet"?, with Livius (9.8.6): "ne quid divini humanive obstet quominus iustum piumque de integro ineatur bellum.&...
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3answers
636 views

Difference between future participle and simple future

They say taking a walk over a cemetery inspires you to ponder the big questions. I have definitely found that to be true, as I recently came across this inscription on a local graveyard: According to ...
5
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1answer
122 views

What is the present participle of fio?

Horace wrote the line brevis esse laboro, obscurus fio in De Arte Poetica Liber. I want to use the latter half of the phrase, obscurus fio, as a song title but I'd like it to be in the form of I am ...
3
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1answer
102 views

How do you say something is "in flux" in Classical Latin?

In English we have in flux, which you can use to say that something is in a state of change. How do you use an adjective that way in Latin? Could you use fluxus in ablative/accusative case with the ...
8
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3answers
209 views

What type of purpose clause for specifying a substantive gerundive

When using a substantive gerundive, what form would a specifying purpose clause take? For instance: "things to be used for fighting," I would use a gerundive (utenda) and then what? A dative ...
3
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1answer
78 views

What are the Roles of "Quin" and "Sit" in "fieri non potest quin sit"?

In the question on Sherlockian logic, Batavulus, in his answer gave an alternative translation of the clause "it must be believed"/ "one must believe it", which is: "fieri ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Is this a proper construction?

I am nearly certain that this is off-topic for being too specific, but I have no idea where else on the wide internet to even go. SPLENDIDIS MENS MEA Affectionately written on a piece of jewelry, ...
2
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1answer
63 views

Ubi jus ibi remedium

I am trying to make sense of the phrase ubi jus ibi remedium. It seems incomplete, and I feel I should add two verbs and something to separate the two sentences, for example: Ubi jus est, ibi est ...
6
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1answer
117 views

How do you say "feed on (something)" in Latin

Not the most experienced in Latin, so this may seem redundant to most, but I'm trying to figure out how to say "to feed on (something)". I'm assuming I just change the case of the object ...
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4answers
1k views

Why is this a correct sentence: "Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum magnā familiā habitat"?

In Familia Romana Cap. 5 there is this sentence: Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum Aemiliā et cum magnā familiā in vīllā habitat. I'm struggling to understand why this sentence is grammatically correct. ...
5
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1answer
265 views

Are future active participles of deponent verbs used in place of future passive participles? Why?

In form, nātūrus is a future active participle of the (deponent) verb nāscor – which otherwise only appears in passive forms – and is used to mean about to rise and, taken literally, about to be born, ...
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1answer
182 views

UPDATE: How to translate "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable?"

I am trying to translate the saying "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable" into Latin, but I don't actually know Latin, and I've run into a wall. I think the verbs should be ...
5
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2answers
154 views

How would one say "Please let me do X thing"

Was wondering how one would say "Please let me do X thing" e.g. "Please let me love/win/see" Would you use some sort of impersonal construction, or would one use "permitto&...
9
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1answer
179 views

The interjection "o" with different cases

I recently came across o beatum te in a letter and I was surprised that accusative was used instead of vocative. Lewis and Short indeed indicate that the interjection o can be used with vocative, ...
3
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2answers
285 views

The difference between ablative absolute and a participle coniunctum

(old misleading title: The difference between ablative absolute and present participle) On participles A&G notes: The present and perfect participles are often used as a predicate, where in ...
4
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1answer
86 views

When should you use genitive pronouns and when should you use possessive adjectives?

I was reading @brianpck's post about genitive pronouns vs possessive adjectives, and trying to understand when it's better to use one versus the other. Compare these two sentences: Mater non est apud ...
7
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1answer
560 views

Why is Italiae used rather than Italis in the phrase "In hortis Italiae"?

In the Grammatica Latina at the end of Cap. V of LLPSI Pars I, Ørberg has the following examples for singular and plural ablative of each gender: [A] Masculinum. In horto Iulii. In hortis Italiae. [...
3
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1answer
68 views

Can afficio be used to mean "approach?"

In English, we can say "I made towards the abandoned building" which means the same thing as "I approach the abandoned building." I'm guessing it may be possible, via a ...

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