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Questions tagged [grammar-choice]

When asking which choice (case, tense, mood etc.) is grammatical in a given situation, use this tag.

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Is the phrase professor emerita grammatically correct?

Since professor has masculine gender, one may think that the phrase should be professor emeritus, regardless of the gender of the person referred to. Is the use of emerita simply a case of grammatical ...
7
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1answer
55 views

Is my rephrasing of this purpose clause correct?

Suppose I have a sentence: "Hercules reliquit viam ut Megaram peteret." If I want to rephrase the purpose clause using the gerund / gerundive; would it be correct to write the following? "...
5
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1answer
48 views

New to Latin—why is the Present Indicative sometimes at the end, and sometimes in the middle of a sentence?

I'm working my way through Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, and I've come across something that's tripping me up when I try to write. Example: Gallia est in Europa (pardon the lack of accents); and ...
4
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1answer
58 views

Case of the adjective in “made someone more something”

In A new latin composition by Charles E. Bennett one may find following statement to translate into latin (from Lesson IV): This circumstance made the troops more courageous. My attempt at ...
6
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1answer
193 views

Shouldn't “decursus” be accusative in Psalm 1:3?

(Psalm 1:3, Clementine Vulgate) Et erit tamquam lignum quod plantatum est secus decursus aquarum, quod fructum suum dabit in tempore suo: et folium ejus non defluet; et omnia quæcumque faciet ...
3
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2answers
62 views

How do I say “this is mine”?

Suppose I want to say "this house is mine" in Latin. The straightforward translation, dōmus haec est mea, sounds odd to me—perhaps just because English changes its possessive pronouns in predicate ...
7
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1answer
52 views

When did the infinitive of purpose arise?

In Classical Latin, purpose would normally be expressed with ut, or ad with a gerund, or a supine with a verb of motion, or numerous other ways. However, in later and vulgar Latin (most notably the ...
4
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2answers
177 views

How do I say “everything started here”?

I would like like to translate "everything started here" in Latin. Would omni coepia hinc work?
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Is “que” or “et” better for a “God and Family” tattoo?

Hi I’m planning to have a tattoo and I would like to have a translation in Latin of “God and Family”. Which one is appropriate, "deo et familia" or "deo familiaque"?
6
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2answers
181 views

What cases were used in compounds?

In Greco-Latin compound words, I generally use the bare stems for all but the last component, joined together with stem vowels (in Greek) or i (in Latin). For example, certifaciō (> certify) comes ...
5
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1answer
51 views

How do I negate an ut clause of result?

Ut clauses of result are excellent for saying "so ___ that". But what if I wanted to reverse this and say "not ___ enough to"? For example, tam strenue laborābam ut epistolās centum scripserim means "...
3
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1answer
38 views

How it's better to translate “The best house” into Latin?

Can I use "Domus optima" or "Domus optimus" as the equivalent (I do not need a literal translation) of "The best house"? Should "optima" be used with a noun "domus" or both are correct?
6
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2answers
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In: Ablative or accusative

In chapter 4 LLPSI it says "sacculum suum in mensa ponit". Ponit means put or sets, so indicates a movement. As far as I know in in Latin in the meaning of into or onto (as is the case here) takes the ...
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1answer
131 views

What is the logic behind the order of the cases

Most English books of Latin use the order used by Charles E. Bennett: Nominative, Genitive, Dative, Accusative, Vocative, Ablative. But most French books use the following order: Nominative, ...
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1answer
46 views

How to write “Stand on the shoulders of giants” correctly? [duplicate]

I know that "nanos gigantium humeris insidentes" is "dwarves on the shoulders of giants". But what is the properly written way of saying either "on the shoulders of giants" and/or "standing on the ...
6
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1answer
90 views

SPQR: Why not Romani?

The motto of the Roman Republic was, of course, Senatus Populusque Romanus, or SPQR. However, Romanus is a masculine, singular adjective. What confuses me is that it is referencing Senatus Populusque. ...
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0answers
25 views

Quippe+quod (Early Modern period)

Looking at other posts on quippe+relatives (particularly, at this link:1), there seems to be a consensus that it will usually show up with qui/... but not with quod, but I'm currently looking at a ...
5
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1answer
47 views

Is “nolī esse” grammatical?

In the Vatican's Nova Vulgata, Ecclesiastes 7:16-17 reads as follows: Noli esse nimis iustus neque sapiens supra modum! Cur te perdere vis? Ne agas nimis impie et noli esse stultus! Cur ...
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1answer
138 views

NSFW - Trying to create a Latin motto for a coat of arms - Edited for clarity

So, I took a couple years of Latin in school, but it's been awhile. I was trying to create this motto, and I'm not sure if I'm declining the nouns properly. Also not sure I remember if word order is ...
5
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1answer
70 views

How to continue doing something?

There are many Latin verbs meaning roughly "continue", but I failed to find a description how to use any of them with another verb. I would like to say things like "Keep walking!" and "She continues ...
3
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0answers
52 views

How to speak a language with a third declension adjective?

Most Latin adjectives related to names of countries and languages are of first and second declension: Latinus, Graecus, Anglicus… If I want to express that I speak in any such language, I will ...
5
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1answer
73 views

Translation verification

I’m wondering whether my translation is correct. I wrote: tempus fugit; sed muscae fugiunt etiam. I meant for this to mean: Time flies, but flies fly too. I really don't have any knowledge ...
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1answer
38 views

-ne as an Indication of Fear in a Question

I was recently taking a sort of multiple choice quiz on just general Latin knowledge, and I came upon one question that threw me for a loop, so to speak. The question asked which of the options best ...
5
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2answers
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Time as a Measure of Separation

I recently can across the following phrase when watching a video about the Battle of Ilerda: With Caesar still weeks away... This got me to wondering how one would translate such a phrase. It is ...
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0answers
38 views

What is the difference between conjunctive present and perfect with ne?

I have seen both present and perfect forms of the conjunctive for negative orders or requests, for example ne canas and ne cecineris. What is the difference? Is one more an order and the other more a ...
3
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0answers
110 views

Latin gender and non-binary gender identity

I am preparing for a large academic event where Latin is used. Latin will be used in the spoken ceremonies and, more importantly for this question, in written diplomas. The gender of the recipient of ...
4
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0answers
83 views

Mr Bean's Latin lyrics

I just saw an episode of Mr Bean and once again heard the choir sing in Latin. Based on what I remember hearing and what I found online, the four segments sung are: Start: Ecce homo qui est faba &...
5
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2answers
411 views

In which case should book authors be written?

At the beginning of every book, there is the name of the author followed by the title itself. However, the case, in which the author's name is written may vary. Let me illustrate with two examples: ...
4
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1answer
120 views

Is there any acceptable translation for “Lux Astrum”?

While asking this question where I was asking about building a brand name and motto using Latin, I realized that my choice of name is incorrect. If you want to go with lux astrum or something ...
5
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2answers
485 views

Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

I'm building the brand for a web development company, and I'm using Latin for the name and slogan. However, as I am not familiar with the language, I would like some help clarifying meanings to avoid ...
3
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0answers
41 views

Is the following sentence grammatically correct?

I'm in university and in creative writing they asked us to write a short story. I chose a mystery story and composed this sentence for it: Omni usurpant optimes sapientes virtutes acceptum verum ...
4
votes
3answers
286 views

Using “ad” vs. dative

The self-exercises in CAPVT VIII of Wheelock's Latin (7th Edition) include the following sentence (#11): Litterās ad virginem scrībit. He is writing a letter to the maiden. I'm confused about ...
4
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1answer
101 views

Ablative of Comparison w/ Relative Pronoun?

Fairly frequently in Latin one encounters a "backwards" comparison, in which the relative pronoun in the ablative precedes the term of comparison. ...philosophiam ad te adlegem, qua nec mihi ...
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1answer
80 views

Is “adeptus astra telepathica” grammatically correct?

In the multimedia franchise Warhammer 40,000, a space empire known as the Imperium of Man uses various Latin phrases to name their various government departments. I looked these up in Latin ...
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1answer
55 views

Ne … quidem with preposition

What would be the translation of: He does not play even with his brother? Could it be: Ne cum fratre suo quidem ludit? Normally I have seen the structure ne ... quidem with a noun in the nominative ...
2
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1answer
58 views

Can a morphologically singular collective noun be syntactically plural?

In English the noun "family" is singular but it means a group (of people). Syntactically it can be singular or plural: one can say "the family is/are…" with either choice. Can this kind of ...
3
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1answer
42 views

Doing things “out of vanity”

How can I say "he did it out of vanity" in Latin? The only thing I could see is a causal ablative: vanitate sua ita fecit. Are there other options for doing something "out of vanity", "out of pity", ...
4
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1answer
41 views

A correct title for the book from the Evil Dead movies?

In the Evil Dead movies the infamous book is given an inconsistently spelled name, which vanished in the other installments. The scripts for the original movie and the remake titled it "Naturan ...
2
votes
1answer
50 views

“Implied Power”

I am looking for a way to say "Implied Power" in Latin. When I say "Implied Power" I mean to say "Implicit Political Authority." Here is an example to walk readers through what I am trying to get at: ...
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votes
1answer
72 views

How do you say “imply” in Latin?

I need to know how to say the present, past and future tense of "imply" in Latin. I don't know much Latin, I just need the grammatically correct way to say: "Implied ______" For example, for "Implied ...
3
votes
1answer
42 views

Is “Vinicultores Illustrissimi Hungari” grammatically correct?

I found the following inscription on the cover of a "Codex vinorum": "Vinicultores Illustrissimi Hungari" (as I would translate: the most excellent Hungarian viticulturists). I would like to give this ...
4
votes
1answer
102 views

Credere with Dative or Accusative

I came across this sentence in a fictional dialog in my Latin lesson. difficile est mihi hoc credere. In this context, hoc refers to someone else's claim of accomplishment. I had learned earlier ...
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1answer
288 views

When to use cum + subjunctive and when cum + indicative

So I have never, ever, ever been able to grasp fully any explanation in any textbook of when to use "cum" with the subjunctive and when to use it with the indicative, because the examples they give ...
2
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1answer
35 views

Oratio obliqua and case agreement between accusative subject and subject in subordinate subjunctive

Given an accusative subject of oratio obliqua, if that subject is or words declined with it it are repeated in a subordinate subjunctive, are they accusative or nominative in the subjunctive? Exemplī ...
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1answer
43 views

Is the phrase 'Nec mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli' incorrect?

What is the difference between Ne mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli and Nec mea dona tibi studio disperta fideli and is the latter version, which differs in the single letter 'c' only, ...
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1answer
39 views

Would these two sentences be grammatically correct?

I used a dictionary and read up on declensions but since I have zero knowledge on the language, I have no idea if I translated them correctly (most likely not). I was hoping someone could provide ...
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1answer
120 views

Ordinal adjectives for single things modifying plural noun?

To refer to "the first and second chapters", do I say: capitula prima et secunda or: capitula primum et secundum?
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1answer
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A range of chapters

How do you grammatically denote a range of chapters, like what I'm trying to do in this sentence? Ecce in hac pagina vox Iohannis Ørbergii capitula prima usque decima Linguae Latinae Per Se ...
4
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1answer
129 views

Nested genitive?

I just said this to a friend: Ecce in hac pagina vox Iohannis Ørbergii capitula a primo usque ad decimum Linguae Latinae Per Se Illustratae legentis: https://sites.google.com/site/...
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Did the Romans distinguish derivation and loan?

I learned from this question that the Romans used the same verb mutuari both for loaning words from Greek and deriving new words within Latin. Are there any examples in classical literature that make ...