Questions tagged [grammar-choice]

When asking which choice (case, tense, mood etc.) is grammatical in a given situation, use this tag.

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4
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0answers
55 views

How to express shared ownership of several individuals

The distinction between shared ownership and private ownership of individuals is well illustrated in Dreyer's English: An Utterly Correct Guide to Clarity and Style: If Jeanette has some pencils and ...
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1answer
61 views

Which Case is Governed by Verb Obsto/ Obstare?

Continuing from Q: What is the Role of "Quid" in "ne quid obstet"?, with Livius (9.8.6): "ne quid divini humanive obstet quominus iustum piumque de integro ineatur bellum.&...
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3answers
573 views

Difference between future participle and simple future

They say taking a walk over a cemetery inspires you to ponder the big questions. I have definitely found that to be true, as I recently came across this inscription on a local graveyard: According to ...
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1answer
101 views

What is the present participle of fio?

Horace wrote the line brevis esse laboro, obscurus fio in De Arte Poetica Liber. I want to use the latter half of the phrase, obscurus fio, as a song title but I'd like it to be in the form of I am ...
3
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1answer
81 views

How do you say something is “in flux” in Classical Latin?

In English we have in flux, which you can use to say that something is in a state of change. How do you use an adjective that way in Latin? Could you use fluxus in ablative/accusative case with the ...
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3answers
185 views

What type of purpose clause for specifying a substantive gerundive

When using a substantive gerundive, what form would a specifying purpose clause take? For instance: "things to be used for fighting," I would use a gerundive (utenda) and then what? A dative ...
3
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1answer
52 views

What are the Roles of “Quin” and “Sit” in “fieri non potest quin sit”?

In the question on Sherlockian logic, Batavulus, in his answer gave an alternative translation of the clause "it must be believed"/ "one must believe it", which is: "fieri ...
3
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1answer
60 views

Is this a proper construction?

I am nearly certain that this is off-topic for being too specific, but I have no idea where else on the wide internet to even go. SPLENDIDIS MENS MEA Affectionately written on a piece of jewelry, ...
2
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1answer
45 views

Ubi jus ibi remedium

I am trying to make sense of the phrase ubi jus ibi remedium. It seems incomplete, and I feel I should add two verbs and something to separate the two sentences, for example: Ubi jus est, ibi est ...
6
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1answer
94 views

How do you say “feed on (something)” in Latin

Not the most experienced in Latin, so this may seem redundant to most, but I'm trying to figure out how to say "to feed on (something)". I'm assuming I just change the case of the object ...
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Why is this a correct sentence: “Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum magnā familiā habitat”?

In Familia Romana Cap. 5 there is this sentence: Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum Aemiliā et cum magnā familiā in vīllā habitat. I'm struggling to understand why this sentence is grammatically correct. ...
4
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1answer
224 views

Are future active participles of deponent verbs used in place of future passive participles? Why?

In form, nātūrus is a future active participle of the (deponent) verb nāscor – which otherwise only appears in passive forms – and is used to mean about to rise and, taken literally, about to be born, ...
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1answer
128 views

UPDATE: How to translate “Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable?”

I am trying to translate the saying "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable" into Latin, but I don't actually know Latin, and I've run into a wall. I think the verbs should be ...
5
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2answers
136 views

How would one say “Please let me do X thing”

Was wondering how one would say "Please let me do X thing" e.g. "Please let me love/win/see" Would you use some sort of impersonal construction, or would one use "permitto&...
9
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1answer
124 views

The interjection “o” with different cases

I recently came across o beatum te in a letter and I was surprised that accusative was used instead of vocative. Lewis and Short indeed indicate that the interjection o can be used with vocative, ...
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2answers
221 views

The difference between ablative absolute and a participle coniunctum

(old misleading title: The difference between ablative absolute and present participle) On participles A&G notes: The present and perfect participles are often used as a predicate, where in ...
4
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1answer
71 views

When should you use genitive pronouns and when should you use possessive adjectives?

I was reading @brianpck's post about genitive pronouns vs possessive adjectives, and trying to understand when it's better to use one versus the other. Compare these two sentences: Mater non est apud ...
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1answer
536 views

Why is Italiae used rather than Italis in the phrase “In hortis Italiae”?

In the Grammatica Latina at the end of Cap. V of LLPSI Pars I, Ørberg has the following examples for singular and plural ablative of each gender: [A] Masculinum. In horto Iulii. In hortis Italiae. [...
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1answer
66 views

Can afficio be used to mean “approach?”

In English, we can say "I made towards the abandoned building" which means the same thing as "I approach the abandoned building." I'm guessing it may be possible, via a ...
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1answer
39 views

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Bk II, first para., “conplexus”

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Book II, paragraph I: Mundum et hoc—quocumque nomine alio caelum appellare libuit cuius circumflexu teguntur cuncta, numen esse credi par est, aeternum, inmensum, neque ...
7
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1answer
113 views

How does Latin handle “picture nouns”?

"Picture nouns" are nouns like that have their own content such as, picture, story. In English this characteristics results in ambiguity. When we say "my photo" it may mean: A ...
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1answer
87 views

Does the grammar work on this: Nova eruditione requirens dialecticus

Nova eruditione requirens dialecticus (it spells nerd, which is the point of this) I wanted it to mean "the dialecticus that is searching for new knowledge" but it's been a while since I ...
5
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1answer
105 views

When do we use supine and 'ut/ne' clause to express purpose?

Often told that supine is used for Verbs of motion while 'ut/ne' for other verbs. An explanation here could help more.
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2answers
103 views

The use of et…et and the following grammar

Salvete omnes, doctissimi amici et amicae, a question rose from Orberg LLPSI I, where it says: "Iam et Marcus et Quintus mala habent." Why would he use the accusativus pluralis of malum when ...
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1answer
219 views

Quem or quid when asking what something is buying?

I am not sure whether to say "Quem emit Iulius?" or "Quid emit Iulius?" if I want to know what Julius is buying. I know the interrogative pronoun should be in the accusative case ...
3
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2answers
109 views

“you should know how to do it by now”

How to render the English should when in the sense of "it is expected" rather than hortatory command or "it behooves". Examples to illustrate the meaning I'm looking for: A: "...
5
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1answer
401 views

“Ego me omnium hominum beatissimum tot annos putabam”: Why annos is accusative here?

In the beginners-book "Julia" by Maud Reed we find this sentence: "Non falsa," inquit, "Solon, vir sapiens, dixit. Ego me omnium hominum beatissimum tot annos putabam. Nunc ...
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2answers
2k views

How to say “To serve, not to be served” in Latin?

I would like to know how to translate the phrase "To serve, not to be served" in Latin. It doesn't have to be a word for word translation. But, I want to know the phrase that would give the ...
4
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2answers
181 views

How do you say “one more [something]”?

Answers to the question Latin version of "non ho che un" or "je n'ai qu'un" suggest that English more than one can be translated to Latin as plus unum (even though there ...
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1answer
49 views

Carpe sciurum (sieze/harvest the squirrel?)

Would 'carpe sciurum' be a functional translation of 'seize the squirrel'? (As in to 'harvest' or 'pluck' the squirrel?)
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1answer
51 views

Preposition of agent

Is it better to say a lectica portatur or in lectica portatur if it's the lectīcā who is the agent? Gratias plurimas.
3
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1answer
117 views

Comparisons in Latin- does this make sense?

Here is my sentence: I'm trying to say that "The gods seemed to favor Romulus because he saw 12 vultures, twice the number of birds that Remus saw." Dii Romulō favere visi sunt quia ille ...
3
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3answers
172 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...
3
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0answers
32 views

Ascend “by”, should it be ablative?

In music, a "comma" is a rough unit of intonation. If I were to refer to a refrain which had globally ascended a comma compared to the previous time it occurred, does it make sense that it ...
1
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1answer
146 views

Does this sentence in Latin make sense?

I'm having some trouble with indirect speech and was wondering if my answers to these questions are correctly worded. Quid Priamus ante Pyrrhō praedīxit quam periit? Priamus praedixit deos ...
3
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1answer
108 views

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

For the sake of this question, I'm going to be using this definition of neologism, "A newly coined word or phrase." From my understanding, the loose etymology of this word is the French neo plus Greek ...
8
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1answer
323 views

Can “sum” and “nemo” work together to create a phrase meaning “I am no one?”

I have been trying to understand the relationship between "sum" and "nemo", to create a phrase meaning something like "I am no one". In all the contexts I personally ...
4
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2answers
391 views

Furtum est, secundum lege lata, contrectatio rei alienae fraudulenta

How to say this in proper, idiomatic, classical Latin? Theft is, according to existing law, laying hands on others' (foreign, strange, belonging to others) things fraudulently. Would one use the ...
5
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3answers
601 views

Sentence which includes an example of each case

I'm looking for a sentence which includes the usage of each case of Latin. For example, a student could mark each word in the sentence to indicate its case and function for ease of learning. Extreme ...
4
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1answer
105 views

As X came, Y deftly stepped aside

I was wondering, in a sentence where you have the following structure: As he came, Julius deftly stepped aside Would you express this with dum, or with a participle, or with cum/postquam, while ...
2
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1answer
116 views

A Completed Action in the Mind OR Indirect Speech?

There are currently two theories (of which I am aware) to explain the use of the perfect subjunctive, in examples from the Latin Vulgate, included in brianpck's answer to Q: Memento quod <...
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1answer
330 views

Semantic difference of ablative and accusative cases when following “in”

What is the semantic and conceptual difference of ablative and accusative cases when following in? Examples: In dubio pro reo & opinio iuris uniformis et in longo usu Dubio and longo are in ...
4
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2answers
163 views

A Royal Title for a Fictional King

So, I'm trying to make a royal title in Latin for a fictional king. I tried to model it heavily after Queen Elizabeth II's royal title to keep myself as accurate as possible and I came up with: ...
3
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1answer
134 views

Why the Perfect Subjunctive?

In this question, R.B. Jawad asked for a translation of two sentences. The second of these: "canuntur quando reversi fuerint et appropinquant regias ecclesie (sic)." was translated by brianpck: ...
6
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1answer
89 views

Hoc as a word to sum up a previous paragraph

I have seen hoc not agreeing with grammatical gender when it refers to a previous paragraph of actions. But I don't remember in what context. Here is a made up example in English: I once went to ...
4
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3answers
284 views

Best Latin translation of an English Phrase “Always Present, Never Seen”

I am designing some potential products for my organization, and I want to include a version that includes a tag line written in Latin of one of the our organizational values. The phrase I'm looking ...
10
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2answers
316 views

Is it “bene videtur” or “bonum videtur”? Adjective or adverb with verbs/copulae meaning “seem”

With verbs like "seem, appear", one sometimes uses an adverb to express how something appears ("she looked well"), at other times an adjective ("he seemed angry"). How did the Romans do it, ...
4
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1answer
133 views

“Aliquid scribere” or “de aliquo scribere”

Scaliger once wrote Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat, by which he obviously meant that Manilius did not know what he was writing about. In English, there is a big difference between "writing ...
5
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0answers
104 views

Infinitive clause constructed via plural noun

I stumbled upon this sentence and I am quite perplexed. I would translate as the first example I'll show, but I'd like to be sure. "Cum ista ex militum cognitione toti Galli intelligant esse ...
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2answers
465 views

Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat

When the formidable classicist A. E. Housman published his critical edition of Manilius' Astronomicon, he stated in his infamous preface, "When Scaliger says at v 39 Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat ...

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