Questions tagged [english]

This tag is for questions concerning the relations between English and Latin (or Greek). Questions have to be about English (to some extent), not necessarily in English.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
3 votes
0 answers
54 views

Common latin phrase for "and the opposite case too"

I recall once seeing in some notes (not for Latin) which contained a Latin phrase - I can't recall the exact definition but contextually I knew it meant something along the lines of "and the ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
103 views

Expressions of contempt or credulity in Latin

I am looking for a Latin equivalent of ‘my eye/ my arse’ as an expression of contempt or incredulity in Latin or less emphatic ‘I don’t think! e.g. He’s a model of good behaviour, my eye/ my arse/ I ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
164 views

I am hungry. >> Latin

How can I say "I am hungry." in Latin? Suggestions: Sum esuriens. Habeo fames. Habeo inedia. Esurio. And what about "I am thirsty."? Context: I study alone Latin. Thank you.
user avatar
  • 79
1 vote
2 answers
124 views

When Does A Deponent Verb Return to its Passive Roots?

As is often the case, I found this while looking for something else: the Wiki entry for deponent verb, "nitor" = "bear; lean on; supported by; I am based on". Note the passive ...
user avatar
  • 7,266
3 votes
1 answer
276 views

commence < commensa = "joint table"?

M. J. Toswell, Today's Medieval University p. 24 claims a new master would eat at the commensa, the joint table, after his commencement ceremony of stepping upward Does the English word "...
user avatar
  • 3,052
3 votes
2 answers
961 views

How do you translate "deeds, not words" into Latin?

I am looking to translate the phrase "deeds not words" into Latin. This is for a tattoo. I tried looking at Google Translate and it tells me either facta non verba or acta non verba. I need ...
user avatar
  • 41
3 votes
1 answer
49 views

Create new word: super + portare

I want to create a new word by analogy to "support" with the prefix super-. According to Google the modern English word "support" comes from Latin supportare and is composed of sub-...
user avatar
  • 33
8 votes
2 answers
191 views

"£30,000? Murders have been committed for a lot less."

In an old TV-prog. (1950s), "The Annals of Scotland Yard", old cases were dramatised with a narration from distinguished criminologist, the late Edgar Lustgarten. One of these, from the ...
user avatar
  • 7,266
2 votes
1 answer
89 views

Translation Request, English to Latin

How can I translate this sentence to Latin, "Man in the palace! Remember death, live with fear of death. Leave us alone." I translate like that but... I don't know, I guess, I did a mistake. ...
user avatar
  • 23
5 votes
1 answer
265 views

Looking for a proper translation of "life is deaf"

What I want to do I'm trying to create a statement that essentially is describing life as being deaf. Roughly in english this would be "life is deaf". The problem is that I'm trying to ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
128 views

Does trisyllabic laxing occur in Latin words like 'decision' before entering English?

There's a phenomenon called Trisyllabic laxing where the vowel in a stressed syllable is shortened if two (or more) syllables follow. If the stressed vowel is in at least* the penultimate syllable (...
user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
940 views

How do I say, "In pursuit of Truth, Beauty, and Goodness"?

I know "Truth, Beauty, Goodness" is "Veritas, Bonitas, Pulcritudo." But do I need an "et" before "Pulcritudo"? When do you use and's in Latin? And how would ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
223 views

Are there any general rules for creating 'proper' Latin neologisms, beyond matching gender, number, and case?

For the sake of this question, I'm going to be using this definition of neologism, "A newly coined word or phrase." From my understanding, the loose etymology of this word is the French neo plus Greek ...
user avatar
  • 151
5 votes
1 answer
194 views

Does Latin allow the letter K in suffixed words?

Does Latin allow the letter 'k' in suffixed words? Actually, I'm explaining a phenomenon in which English spelling changes... Consider the following examples: Likeable, shakeable, makeable - these ...
user avatar
13 votes
1 answer
1k views

Et cetera versus et alia

I have a couple of English usage manuals on my desk (Fowler 2e and Garner). Fowler says it's silly to restrict etc. to things rather than people, while Garner says to use etc. only for things, et al. ...
user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
883 views

What is the plural of "telos" as used in English?

We sometimes use the borrowed word "telos" in English. It's obviously just a transliteration of τέλος (end, purpose, aim), which plays an important role especially in Aristotelian philosophy. τέλος ...
user avatar
  • 36.7k
2 votes
1 answer
99 views

What are some of the major words that we use in English directly (unmodified) from Latin?

I am looking through the Wiki page on Latin words used in English, but they mostly consist of words like "lux" and "terra", words that are sort of used in English, but really have that Latin feel to ...
user avatar
  • 288
1 vote
2 answers
548 views

Is "mobile (vulgus)" used to refer to a "mob"?

According to Wiktionary, the English term "mob" (as in group of people) comes from the Middle English "mobile", which comes from the Latin "mobile (vulgus)" (a moving crowd). Is this meaning attested ...
user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
2k views

Does "Op. cit." stand for "opus citatum" or "opere citato"?

Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary says "opere citato" American Heritage Dictionary, Collins and Oxford (at Lexico.com) say "opere citato" Merriam Webster Dictionary has an entry ...
user avatar
  • 153
4 votes
3 answers
190 views

Is "Stanford populi" bad Latin?

In their "Open Loop University" concept vision, Stanford introduces "populi" as the next conceptual step after "alumni". Examples of usage follow. "...we now have a populi of 215,000 ongoing students....
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
46 views

What semantic notions underlie 'fold' with 'plight; predicament'?

Of the two noun homonyms 'pledge', I'm asking merely about that derived from Latin. For the other homonym from Proto-Germanic , please see this. Etymonline for 'plight (n.1)' : "condition or ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
54 views

How's the etymology 'exert' "probably due to antithesis with inserĕre"?

"exert, v." OED Online. Accessed 26 June 2019. Can someone please expound the sentence underlined in green?
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
38 views

'exert' : How can you 'attach or join out' something?

exert (v.) 1660s, "thrust forth, push out," from Latin exertus/exsertus, past participle of exerere/exserere "thrust out, put forth," from ex "out, from within" (see ex-) ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
50 views

What semantic notions underlie 'join together' and 'impose, inflict' (ie injunct)?

I'm trying to understand the etymology of injunction. To wit, how did in- "on" (from PIE root *en "in") + iungere "to join together" (from nasalized form of PIE root *yeug- "to join") ...
user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
2k views

Etymology of ambulance

For a while I have been curious about the etymology of the English word 'ambulance' since it seems to be derived from the Latin word 'ambulare' (to walk). This seems a strange origin for the word. ...
user avatar
  • 183
25 votes
5 answers
34k views

Is "history" a male-biased word ("his+story")?

In the last International Women's Day I saw some footage showing a poster with the phrase "women making herstory", as opposed to "history". The phrase was playing with the fact that the word "history" ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
85 views

Word construction like "philanthropist" but regarding silence instead of humankind?

What would be the Latin/English term for somebody who loves silence? Featuring phil(e) as pre- or suffix. Like ... silenciophile? That maybe makes "some sense" - but I've no idea if it is correct or ...
user avatar
  • 153
5 votes
1 answer
227 views

Nihilominus and nonetheless, related?

I find the word nihilominus remarkable. Like many Spanish or English words, the meaning can sort of be deduced from the meaning of the words making the composite (e.g. paraguas in Spanish, whiteboard ...
user avatar
13 votes
1 answer
4k views

Etymology of "salarium" and its connection to salt

It has been asked before both in the English Language & Usage site and the Spanish Language site about the etymology of salary and salario, respectively. In both cases, this site was mentioned as ...
user avatar
  • 2,119
9 votes
1 answer
223 views

Audio and video... and tango?

Audio and video are two (apparently XX-century) concepts. Both take the same form as 1st-person sing., present tense Latin verbs. Wiktionary articles for the English words (audio, video) assert that ...
user avatar
  • 10.6k
6 votes
1 answer
94 views

'videlicet': How did "it is permissible to see" semantically shift to mean "that is to say"?

How did 1 beneath semantically shift to 2? Etymonline: viz. 1530s, abbreviation of videlicet [2.] "that is to say, to wit, namely" (mid-15c.), from Latin videlicet, contraction of ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
95 views

Latin phrases adopting an imprecise/incorrect meaning in English (or other languages)

Before staring learning Latin, I was already acquainted with many Latin expressions accommodated to Spanish (and English). Typical examples are ex ante, ex post, vice versa, et cetera, etc. Now that ...
user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
268 views

Vicis - no singular nominative?

I read that vicis has no singular nominative, but it does have a plural one - vices. I find this very interesting, but hard to understand. It is like if the ontological configuration of space-time ...
user avatar
16 votes
2 answers
1k views

Is the usage of "id est" in Latin exactly like the usage of "i.e." or "that is" in English?

There was a question a little while back on the English SE asking about the "plural form of i.e." (unfortunately, it got closed because the author didn't clarify what they meant). While I was trying ...
user avatar
  • 21.7k
2 votes
3 answers
2k views

What is the etymology of the Latin name of Cambridge?

Cambridge is known in Latin as Cantabrigia, and I do not recall seeing other names in use. What is the etymology of this name and how does it relate to the English one? It does remotely resemble the ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
276 views

Translation from English to Latin: How to translate formlessness?

So I'm experimenting with some character concepts for a story dealing with Platonic Forms. So far I have Forma Spatii (the Form of Space) and Forma Tempii (the Form of Time) as characters, as well as ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
140 views

"On the run" in Latin

Is there a Latin equivalent to the English phrase "on the run" to indicate someone who's avoiding capture/recapture? For example, "The prisoner is on the run." Would something like in fuga be ...
user avatar
  • 597
5 votes
1 answer
66 views

General term for each inflected form of a lexeme

illī is a X of ille declension. illī is singular dative masculine form of ille. In the first sentence what we should say instead of X?
user avatar
  • 275
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

Origin of "seize the day" as a translation of Horace's carpe diem

Even many people who have never studied Latin know the phrase carpe diem (from Horace's Odes 1.11), and can tell you that it means "seize the day". But "seize" is not a very close translation of ...
user avatar
  • 28.5k
9 votes
1 answer
175 views

How much larger are Latin texts translated into English?

Judging by number of words, how much translation from Latin to English grow in size? Naturally, this would depend on the text (and the translator), but I imagine there might be some form of range or ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
244 views

Is "mesnomer" the Latin equivalent of the English word "misnomer"?

At first, I thought "misnomer" was an English word adapted from Latin (still learning, as you can see). Yet, it seems it does not exist in Latin. According to Wikipedia: From Anglo-Norman mesnomer, ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
173 views

What does "suscipies et enutries omnes" mean in Augustine?

I'm studying Augustine's Sermon 46, "De Pastoribus," largely via translations into Spanish and English. There are a number of places where my English source and my Spanish source disagree, ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
198 views

How many of Latin words became part of English and Spanish?

For example, if we were to take one of the most used Latin dictionaries (Lewis and Short?), and find out the percentage of total entries that have made it one way or another into English and Spanish, ...
user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
301 views

Should I study Latin in English or in Spanish?

I am a native speaker of Spanish, and a fluent speaker of English. I would like to learn Latin. My intuition tells me that I should study Latin using translations/books in Spanish. This is because ...
user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
527 views

Is there a latin word for 'plausible deniability'?

Plausible deniability in English is a condition in which a subject can safely and believably deny knowledge of any particular truth that may exist so as to shield the subject from any responsibility ...
user avatar
  • 203
4 votes
3 answers
178 views

English adjective derived from Latin for "per equal amount of datapoints"

I'm not completely sure if this is the correct place to ask this, but let's try. Many thanks in advance. I would like to invent a term for an average per equal amount of (sorted) data. With that I ...
user avatar
  • 51
3 votes
1 answer
268 views

How did I misunderstand the Latin 'consisto' in interpreting 'X consists in Y'?

I am trying to understand the English phrase "X consists in Y" with help of and in comparison to the Latin verb consistere. In English, 1 means "X contains Y", but from the Latin point of view ...
user avatar