Questions tagged [word-choice]

For questions concerning how to choose the correct word from a selection of similar-looking alternatives

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2
votes
0answers
53 views

General vs specific "mors" and "vita"

To my understanding, words like vita and mors can either refer to the general concepts of life and death ("life is precious", "remember death") or to specific people's lifespans or ...
2
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2answers
74 views

How does one say "Beyond the curtain (for a theatre)", in Latin?

I don't really know enough about Latin morphology or grammar to get a clear cut answer (already knowing that Latin is a very free-form language), so how does one say it? I was thinking something like ...
8
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1answer
342 views

Why does Müller read "accusatius" in Satyrica 119.11?

Petronius' Satyrica 119.11-12, in Konrad Müller's Teubner edition (1995), reads: hinc Numidae †accusatius†, illinc nova vellera Seres, atque Arabum populus sua despoliaverat arva. What reasons could ...
7
votes
1answer
210 views

Tellus' "briny robes"

I read in Keats' Hyperion: [...] No, by Tellus and her briny robes! (Hyperion, 246) Tellus is a Latin goddess, her Greek counterpart being Gaia. I am looking for the Greek or Latin source of the ...
7
votes
1answer
153 views

What is the difference between ἀρχαῖος and παλαιός?

What is the difference between the two adjectives ἀρχαῖος and παλαιός? In particular, what word would fit the best to mean "history" between ἀρχαιολογία and παλαιολογία?
4
votes
1answer
213 views

Two kinds of falling

The English verb "fall", when the subject is a human, has two main kinds of literal1 meaning as far as I can tell: A change of position: Moving suddenly from higher elevation to lower. (The ...
4
votes
1answer
289 views

translation for Strength, love and courage to Latin

I would like to engrave a piece in Latin for my teenage son with our “family motto.” The motto is strength, love and courage. He is studying Latin and I want to be sure the word choice is accurate. ...
4
votes
1answer
141 views

"For all" and "there exists"

The two most common mathematical quantifiers are "for all" (∀) and "there exists" (∃). I wondered how to render them in Latin. Here is my proposal: for all x: pro omnis x for all ...
4
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1answer
109 views

"From her hands, to life" in Latin

I want to gift someone who is a nurse something with an engraving. I thought about the phrase "from her hands, into life", but in Latin. Based on what I remember from school, my idea is: E ...
6
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2answers
620 views

How do I best translate "A big window into history"?

As I've only recently begun to study Latin, I'm not yet sure how to best translate "A big window into history". First of all, I'm not sure whether the adjective should precede, or rather ...
8
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2answers
880 views

How to say that I have used up all of something?

Suppose that I have a book that has given me a lot of good hints but now I feel that I have exhausted the book and used up all it can give. Is there a Latin verb that I could use to express this? The ...
5
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1answer
158 views

"Project Management" in Latin

I was looking for a translation for "project management" and its adjacents (project manager etc.). There's surprisingly few direct translations for "project", but I've managed to ...
2
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1answer
378 views

μολὼν λαβέ but in Latin

What would be a Latin phrase similar to the sentiment supposedly expressed by Leonidas the first in 'MOLON LABE' "come and take them" in response to Xerxes demanding the Spartans to lay down ...
10
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1answer
324 views

What is the closest Latin equivalent to the modern conception of "(nuclear) family"?

When translating the word "family" into Latin it seems obvious to go to "familia". However, multiple sources (most quoting Richard Saller) tell me that "familia" derives ...
7
votes
1answer
325 views

Difference between 'urbe' and 'oppidum'?

I have found that LLPSI uses oppidum to describe cities (at least in the early chapters) while Duolingo uses urbe. What is the difference, and which should I usually use?
8
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1answer
132 views

When/whether to use "ineō" instead of "eō"

I am learning Latin for the first time this year, and I have a question about the usage of the verb 'eō', I go. The textbook that I am using, Henle Latin 1st Year, lists 'eō' as follows: eō, īre, ...
13
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6answers
9k views

What should the corona virus be called in Latin?

The corona virus (or a specific kind thereof) is a hot topic, and one should of course be able to discuss it in Latin. But what should we call the thing in Latin? Both corona and virus are Latin words,...
5
votes
2answers
248 views

"Venire ad" or "Venire in"?

When can I use "venire ad", or "venire in". (excepting the few locative cases) What kind of buildings, place, etc, can accept the one or the other? Is "venire ad" insists more on the move than "in"? ...
5
votes
1answer
139 views

Difference between "senex "and "senilis"?

What would be the differences in uses of "senilis" and "senex". I know "senilis" is constructed with senex+illis, it should help me, but I don't get it. Thank you.
5
votes
1answer
202 views

What is "heart" as the emotional organ?

In English one uses the word "heart" in a variety of ways to express deep emotion, as in "She will always be in our hearts". Is there a corresponding "emotional organ" in Latin? How should I go about ...
3
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0answers
105 views

Do imperatives trigger reflexive pronouns in Latin?

In English, imperative verbs have "invisible subjects": syntactically, they act like there's an invisible pronoun in the subject position. This is why we see look closely at yourself instead of *look ...
10
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2answers
1k views

What is the superlative of ipse?

In later Latin, as ipse started to lose its force, Petronius uses ipsimus for emphasis: Tamen ad delicias ipsimi [domini] annos quattuordecim fui. Nec turpe est, quod dominus iubet. Ego tamen et ...
4
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1answer
177 views

"Any thoughts" in Latin

How would one translate "any thoughts?" into Latin? It is an ellipse for "does anyone have any thoughts?" I would think "ullas cogitationes?" for "Aliquis ullas cogitationes habet?"
3
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1answer
67 views

Can I submit a manuscript with 'submittere'?

As a scientist, I frequently find myself submitting a manuscript to a journal for peer review and hopefully publication. What would be a good Latin verb for this sense of "submit"? It could also be a ...
5
votes
3answers
247 views

Why there are several words for swimming?

The words nō, natō, adnō are all verbs which means to swim. They have their own conjugation respectively. Maybe there are not only three, but I'm not sure. I wonder why there are several words in ...
3
votes
3answers
4k views

Why is "ita vero" two words?

I was taught the way to say "yes" in Latin is two words: "ita vero". It seems counter-intuitive that it's two words, but why is that so? In essence, why is the Latin word for yes two words? Does "ita" ...
1
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2answers
315 views

Is there a verb for people of the same sex marrying in latin?

As far as I know there are two words in Latin that indicate two people marrying nubere This means to veil oneself for marriage. It thus has to be said by a female member and it is implied that this ...
7
votes
1answer
625 views

Making a strong machine vs. making a machine strong

Consider the two English expressions: He made a strong machine. (He built a machine, and the machine is a strong one.) He made the machine strong. (There was a pre-existing machine but it was not ...
5
votes
1answer
111 views

Idiomatic phrasing of "to the [cardinal direction] of [something]"

I am currently writing a small geography of the Roman Empire at its greatest extent (in the year 117 AD, under Emperor Trajan) in an effort to practice my composition skills. So far everything has ...
4
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3answers
254 views

What is the Latin Homophonic Group?

Equivalent question: What Latin letters won't equal 1? From: the homophonic group: a mathematical diversion --> This is an exercise from Michael Artin's Algebra on, well, abstract algebra. In this ...
4
votes
1answer
46 views

"Alligatus ego vinculis vitae" does it translate to "I am bound by the chains of life."

I was wondering if this translates well. If it does not translate well to mean that phrase, I would appreciate if you could suggest a way to better phrase it in Latin.
5
votes
1answer
350 views

"I am divided. I am balanced. I am one."

I was hoping someone with more experience in Latin could help me confirm whether this translation is correct or not: Ego sum dividitur. Ego sum libratum. Ego sum unum. Does this translate properly ...
6
votes
2answers
233 views

N & H Waxing Poetry: Why is "clam deductus est" used to translate "was led aside"?

In North & Hillard, Ex. 191, q. 3, the following English sentence needs to be translated into Latin: While the conspirators gathered round Caesar, Antonius was led aside by Trebonius. The ...
12
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4answers
2k views

Saints: sanctus or divus?

I was in Bologna last week, and a couple of churches had an inscription about their dedication to a saint. To my surprise, they used the word divus instead of sanctus. For example, a church may be ...
5
votes
2answers
88 views

Which verb do insects fly with?

Having read a question (and answer) about flies flying, I started to wonder whether flies would really fly with the verb volare. I had always somehow imagined that volare referred to more elegant and ...
5
votes
2answers
104 views

Time as a Measure of Separation

I recently can across the following phrase when watching a video about the Battle of Ilerda: With Caesar still weeks away... This got me to wondering how one would translate such a phrase. It is ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

How is time period expressed in Latin?

How is time period expressed in Latin, e.g. "from Jan 1 to Mar 31"? I notice there are two prepositions meaning "from", "ab" and "ex". What's their difference? Which should I use for time period?
9
votes
1answer
3k views

Did the Romans have a word for "volcano"? How did they describe Vesuvius?

I'm curious to know whether the Romans had a word for "volcano", and, more specifically, whether they thought of Mount Vesuvius as a volcano.1 After the eruption of AD 79, I'm sure they had some ...
2
votes
1answer
152 views

"Implied Power"

I am looking for a way to say "Implied Power" in Latin. When I say "Implied Power" I mean to say "Implicit Political Authority." Here is an example to walk readers through what I am trying to get at: ...
10
votes
1answer
122 views

How do you say "imply" in Latin?

I need to know how to say the present, past and future tense of "imply" in Latin. I don't know much Latin, I just need the grammatically correct way to say: "Implied ______" For example, for "Implied ...
3
votes
1answer
688 views

Virtue is the only Nobility

Juvenal writes in Satire VI, VIII, line 20: Nobilitas sola est atque unica virtus. Translated variously as "Virtue is the one and only nobility", "Nobility is the one only virtue",...
14
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2answers
2k views

Pulvis aut Favillae in 'Dust and Ashes' in the Book of Job?

The famous phrase "Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes" does not come from the Bible but from the English Burial Service of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, reading: "we therefore commit his body to the ...
5
votes
2answers
5k views

What’s the Latin word for “information”?

I'm creating a Latin quiz game and want to know the best word/noun for “information”. The word will be used as a title for an information/welcome page on my quiz. I searched the word on the internet ...
2
votes
1answer
111 views

How would you say "we are no one"?

There was a question recently in chat about whether and how to pluralize nemo. Would you say sumus nemo or sumus nemines? Is nemo truly defective in the plural and thus does it only take singular ...
6
votes
2answers
238 views

Using pro and ab in place of ante and post?

I wanted to change windows to use the unabbreviated ante meridiem and post meridiem for A.M. and P.M., but they're one letter too long. Google Translate lists pro and ab as alternate translations for "...
7
votes
4answers
551 views

Softeners for conversational topic transitions: "Well, …", "So, …"

In conversation, we often introduce a new topic or make a transition with a little introductory word, like "Well, …" or "So, …" in English or "Allora …" in Italian. For ...
9
votes
2answers
150 views

How to select dictionary translations

I was looking for a translation of the word "government" and I found in Pons dictionary (German–Latin) that it could be regnum or imperium. On the other hand, I also checked it in Collins ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

What verb is wine made with?

Which verb did the Romans use for making wine? I can imagine saying vinum facio/conficio/primo and maybe some other options as well. Different verbs might emphasize different aspects or steps of ...
8
votes
1answer
104 views

Usage of "Have to" before The Middle Ages

Medieval-esque phrases like "habeo abire" and "is habet scire" do not break the rules of Classical Latin, but I know that they were much more common afterward. This construction interests me greatly, ...
4
votes
1answer
123 views

How to say four-digit years without so many syllables

In English speech, we say the year 1992 not as "one thousand nine hundred ninety-two" but "nineteen ninety-two": five syllables rather than nine. Has a convention like that evolved for Latin? (It's ...