Stack Exchange Network

Stack Exchange network consists of 175 Q&A communities including Stack Overflow, the largest, most trusted online community for developers to learn, share their knowledge, and build their careers.

Visit Stack Exchange

Questions tagged [word-choice]

The tag has no usage guidance.

3
votes
2answers
178 views

Why is “ita vero” two words?

I was taught the way to say "yes" in Latin is two words: "ita vero". It seems counter-intuitive that it's two words, but why is that so? In essence, why is the Latin word for yes two words? Does "ita" ...
2
votes
2answers
121 views

Is there a verb for people of the same sex marrying in latin?

As far as I know there are two words in Latin that indicate two people marrying nubere This means to veil oneself for marriage. It thus has to be said by a female member and it is implied that this ...
7
votes
1answer
607 views

Making a strong machine vs. making a machine strong

Consider the two English expressions: He made a strong machine. (He built a machine, and the machine is a strong one.) He made the machine strong. (There was a pre-existing machine but it was not ...
5
votes
1answer
84 views

Idiomatic phrasing of “to the [cardinal direction] of [something]”

I am currently writing a small geography of the Roman Empire at its greatest extent (in the year 117 AD, under Emperor Trajan) in an effort to practice my composition skills. So far everything has ...
4
votes
3answers
157 views

What is the Latin Homophonic Group?

Equivalent question: What Latin letters won't equal 1? From: the homophonic group: a mathematical diversion --> This is an exercise from Michael Artin's Algebra on, well, abstract algebra. In this ...
4
votes
1answer
36 views

“Alligatus ego vinculis vitae” does it translate to “I am bound by the chains of life.”

I was wondering if this translates well. If it does not translate well to mean that phrase, I would appreciate if you could suggest a way to better phrase it in Latin.
5
votes
1answer
88 views

“I am divided. I am balanced. I am one.”

I was hoping someone with more experience in Latin could help me confirm whether this translation is correct or not: Ego sum dividitur. Ego sum libratum. Ego sum unum. Does this translate properly ...
6
votes
2answers
216 views

N & H Waxing Poetry: Why is “clam deductus est” used to translate “was led aside”?

In North & Hillard, Ex. 191, q. 3, the following English sentence needs to be translated into Latin: While the conspirators gathered round Caesar, Antonius was led aside by Trebonius. The ...
12
votes
4answers
736 views

Saints: sanctus or divus?

I was in Bologna last week, and a couple of churches had an inscription about their dedication to a saint. To my surprise, they used the word divus instead of sanctus. For example, a church may be ...
5
votes
2answers
67 views

Which verb do insects fly with?

Having read a question (and answer) about flies flying, I started to wonder whether flies would really fly with the verb volare. I had always somehow imagined that volare referred to more elegant and ...
5
votes
2answers
78 views

Time as a Measure of Separation

I recently can across the following phrase when watching a video about the Battle of Ilerda: With Caesar still weeks away... This got me to wondering how one would translate such a phrase. It is ...
3
votes
1answer
54 views

How is time period expressed in Latin?

How is time period expressed in Latin, e.g. "from Jan 1 to Mar 31"? I notice there are two prepositions meaning "from", "ab" and "ex". What's their difference? Which should I use for time period?
8
votes
1answer
780 views

Did the Romans have a word for “volcano”? How did they describe Vesuvius?

I'm curious to know whether the Romans had a word for "volcano", and, more specifically, whether they thought of Mount Vesuvius as a volcano.1 After the eruption of AD 79, I'm sure they had some ...
2
votes
1answer
59 views

“Implied Power”

I am looking for a way to say "Implied Power" in Latin. When I say "Implied Power" I mean to say "Implicit Political Authority." Here is an example to walk readers through what I am trying to get at: ...
8
votes
1answer
79 views

How do you say “imply” in Latin?

I need to know how to say the present, past and future tense of "imply" in Latin. I don't know much Latin, I just need the grammatically correct way to say: "Implied ______" For example, for "Implied ...
3
votes
1answer
196 views

Virtue is the only Nobility

Juvenal writes in Satire VI, VIII, line 20: Nobilitas sola est atque unica virtus. Translated variously as "Virtue is the one and only nobility", "Nobility is the one only virtue", "Goodness ...
13
votes
0answers
1k views

Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes

The famous phrase "Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes" does not come from the Bible but from the English Burial Service of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, reading: "we therefore commit his body to the ...
5
votes
2answers
2k views

What’s the Latin word for “information”?

I'm creating a Latin quiz game and want to know the best word/noun for “information”. The word will be used as a title for an information/welcome page on my quiz. I searched the word on the internet ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

How would you say “we are no one”?

There was a question recently in chat about whether and how to pluralize nemo. Would you say sumus nemo or sumus nemines? Is nemo truly defective in the plural and thus does it only take singular ...
6
votes
2answers
113 views

Using pro and ab in place of ante and post?

I wanted to change windows to use the unabbreviated ante meridiem and post meridiem for A.M. and P.M., but they're one letter too long. Google Translate lists pro and ab as alternate translations for "...
7
votes
4answers
241 views

Softeners for conversational topic transitions: “Well, …”, “So, …”

In conversation, we often introduce a new topic or make a transition with a little introductory word, like "Well, …" or "So, …" in English or "Allora …" in Italian. For example, if previously we've ...
9
votes
2answers
97 views

How to select dictionary translations

I was looking for a translation of the word "government" and I found in Pons dictionary (German–Latin) that it could be regnum or imperium. On the other hand, I also checked it in Collins ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

What verb is wine made with?

Which verb did the Romans use for making wine? I can imagine saying vinum facio/conficio/primo and maybe some other options as well. Different verbs might emphasize different aspects or steps of ...
8
votes
1answer
94 views

Usage of “Have to” before The Middle Ages

Medieval-esque phrases like "habeo abire" and "is habet scire" do not break the rules of Classical Latin, but I know that they were much more common afterward. This construction interests me greatly, ...
4
votes
1answer
89 views

How to say four-digit years without so many syllables

In English speech, we say the year 1992 not as "one thousand nine hundred ninety-two" but "nineteen ninety-two": five syllables rather than nine. Has a convention like that evolved for Latin? (It's ...
6
votes
3answers
376 views

Correct translation(s) of “state” when referring to a US state by name or nickname

I'm working on a project that may use one or more Latin phrases that refer directly to a US state or its nickname, but I'm having difficulty interpreting which translation of the word "state" would be ...
10
votes
1answer
246 views

Is there a latin word for 'plausible deniability'?

Plausible deniability in English is a condition in which a subject can safely and believably deny knowledge of any particular truth that may exist so as to shield the subject from any responsibility ...
10
votes
1answer
120 views

Can decisions be wise?

I was asked recently how to translate "a wise decision" (as either the act of deciding, or the result) into Latin. "Wisdom" could perhaps be the Greek loanword sophia or the native Latin sapientia; a ...
8
votes
1answer
105 views

Job 5.7 in the King James version

This extract from the novel 'Three Men in a Boat' refers to Job 5.7: This world is only a probation, and man was born to trouble as the sparks fly upward. I hoped to quote the source, expecting ...
8
votes
2answers
453 views

How do you say “grumpy” in Latin?

I would like to say, "I am a grumpy dog," since I did not get my proper sleep last night. I have a few guesses about "grumpy", but these are only guesses. I looked up "grumpy" on Whitaker's words and ...
12
votes
1answer
2k views

How do you say “perhaps” or “maybe”?

I have a very good guess about how to say "perhaps" or "maybe". But I suspect there are several ways of saying it, with varying degrees of certainty. I wanted to get a better idea. My guess is this. ...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

What would “I Discover” be in Latin?

I need the Latin for "I Discover" - as in "I learn new things, by gathering information about it and/or trying it myself (by trial and error)". I've looked for it in several online dictionaries, but ...
4
votes
1answer
39 views

Pedestrians as Opposed to Riders of Vehicles

If I want to use a term to describe someone who walks on foot rather than riding in a vehicle, which should I choose? I noticed that pedester could refer to any people who walk rather than riding a ...
9
votes
1answer
313 views

Are “parvus” and “magnus” the best adjectives to describe the length of a river?

In the first chapter of Lingua Latina per se Ilustrata, there are a series of sentences used to teach the usage of two adjectives, magnus and parvus. For example: Nīlus fluvius magnus est. ...
15
votes
1answer
2k views

What's the difference between amare and diligere?

In honor of the day (at least in the US): what specific differences can we point to in the usage of amo and diligo, as well as their corresponding nouns amor and dilectio? Lewis and Short indicates: ...
3
votes
1answer
228 views

What is a “roll call” in Latin?

I am looking for a word, verb or noun, to describe reading a list of names out loud to figure out who is present. The Finnish word is "nimenhuuto", and it seems that the English phrase seems to be "...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

John 3:16 In Latin

I know that there exist many Ecclesiastical Latin and Medieval translations kept by professors and most catholic churches, but I decided, just to test my vocabulary, to translate John 3:16 into ...
7
votes
2answers
318 views

What are oranges in Classical Latin?

From the book Rebilius Crusoe by Francis William Newman, the term aurea mala, or golden apples is used to describe oranges. Did any of the Latins have an actual name for this fruit, or was it simply ...
6
votes
2answers
84 views

How to translate “main”?

I am looking for a Latin adjective — or several adjectives if no single one is enough — meaning "main". I might want to talk about a main building or the main idea of a theory. The only ...
7
votes
1answer
124 views

Why is “formas” used for bodies and “corpora” for forms? (Metamorphoses 1.1.1)

The first clause of the Metamorphoses goes, In nova fert animus mutatas dicere formas / corpora; My mind inclines me to speak of bodies changed into new forms. As an English speaker, this ...
6
votes
1answer
39 views

Adverb for approximate numbers

In classical Latin, what is the best adverb for describing approximate numbers? If several work well, are there any differences? I mean saying things like "I have about ten euros". I would translate ...
6
votes
1answer
176 views

When to use βλέπω versus ὁράω?

In Attic Greek, where is it appropriate to find βλέπω instead of ὁράω, and vice versa? Do the verbs have different connotations, or different shades of meaning? As far as I know, they both mean "to ...
8
votes
2answers
135 views

Should you repeat the same verb twice in a ὁ μὲν … ὁ δέ construction?

Let's say you want to translate the following English sentence to Attic Greek. We believed that they were good friends, for whithersoever this one went, that one also went. The first clause calls ...
7
votes
1answer
462 views

Which adjective to use for tallness of people?

If a person is tall, which adjectives can I use? Which one of them is most common in classical Latin? The most suitable-looking adjectives I know are altus, procerus and longus, but I found no clear ...
15
votes
2answers
1k views

In Romans 3:22, why did Jerome prefer to use crēdunt rather than fīdunt?

The Greek text of the Textus Receptus (1550) states, ΚΒʹ δικαιοσύνη δὲ θεοῦ διὰ πίστεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ εἰς πάντας καὶ ἐπὶ πάντας τοὺς πιστεύοντας οὐ γάρ ἐστιν διαστολή TR, 1550 which Jerome ...
12
votes
1answer
1k views

What Latin word could I use to refer to a grocery store?

I would like to say "I am eating in the grocery store", and so far I have come up with "edo in foro" and "edo in emporio". But I'm not sure if either of these would be the best fit. What word would ...
9
votes
1answer
346 views

How do you say “I'm having dinner/lunch/breakfast” in Latin?

I know that cena means dinner, prandium means lunch, and ientaculum means breakfast. But how do you say "I'm having dinner" (or lunch, or breakfast)? I can think of a few ideas, such as: Habeo cenam. ...
8
votes
3answers
270 views

What's the logic behind “eritque Israel in proverbium” (Vulgate bible)

In the Vulgate bible, I encountered the sentence, Eritque Israel in proverbium, et in fabulam cunctis populis. And Israel will be a proverb, and a story for all people. (1 Kings 9:7) I'm ...
6
votes
2answers
495 views

How do you say, “I want to leave the room”?

If you wanted to translate the sentence, "I want to leave the room", from English to Latin, how would you do it? I'm not sure which words to choose for "leave" and "room". I made a few guesses as to ...
8
votes
2answers
275 views

What's the difference between fessus and defessus?

I'm curious to know what the difference is between fessus and defessus. Is de- simply acting as an intensifying prefix? Suppose I were tired at the end of night, and wanted to go to sleep. Would I say ...