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Questions tagged [nuance]

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19
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6answers
2k views

Was “oscŭlum” a cultured word in Latin?

The Spanish language has two words for kiss: Beso, from Latin basium. Ósculo, from Latin oscŭlum. The second one is very seldom used, and only in literature as it is a cultured word. Nonetheless, it ...
2
votes
1answer
38 views

Which modern cities are urbes?

I have understood that urbs is not just a "city", but more properly a "major city". The L&S entry implies that it refers to a walled town, but city walls are rare nowadays. What makes a city an ...
6
votes
0answers
38 views

What is the difference between conjunctive present and perfect with ne?

I have seen both present and perfect forms of the conjunctive for negative orders or requests, for example ne canas and ne cecineris. What is the difference? Is one more an order and the other more a ...
6
votes
1answer
83 views

Did “paganus” mean a non-believer before Christianity?

The adjective paganus is derived from pagus and seems to originally mean roughly "belonging to a village". According to the L&S entry the sense "non-military" is also classically attested. In ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

Politically (in)correct Latin

I am looking for an example of a pair of adjectives or nouns (broadly defined) in classical Latin which mean the same thing but one is considered rude and the other one polite. I could list several ...
8
votes
1answer
95 views

Can infans refer to children who can speak?

The word infans means basically "speechless", as the connection to the verb fari immediately suggests. One specific meaning of this word is a small child (III in the linked L&S entry). I assume ...
4
votes
2answers
76 views

Quōmodo v. Quā ratiōne

I'm looking at a Latin translation of the Apology of Socrates by Marcellus Ficinus and I'm puzzled by the very first clause. Quā vōs quidem ratiōne, Ō virī Athēniēnsēs, affēcerint accūsātōrēs meī, ...
5
votes
2answers
915 views

What does [ὀλίγου] ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην actually MEAN?

The first sentence of the Apology of Socrates is: Ὅτι μὲν ὑμεῖς, ὦ ἄνδρες Άθηναῖοι, πεπόνθατε ὑπὸ τῶν ἐμῶν κατηγόρων, οὐκ οἶδα· ἐγὼ δ' οὖν καὶ αὐτὸς ὑπ' αὐτῶν ὀλίγου ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην, οὕτω ...
3
votes
3answers
66 views

Is there a more emphatic version of posse?

If I want to say "I can" in Latin, I will usually use posse. But what if I want something stronger and more emphatic, like "I am capable of", "I am able to", or similar? I am not aware of a Latin ...
9
votes
1answer
244 views

Comparison of omnes, cuncti, and universi

The three adjectives omnis, cunctus, and universus appear to be essentially synonymous. They are often used in the plural. The entries in L&S suggest very strong similarity, but I find it unlikely ...
5
votes
2answers
163 views

Has the meaning of any Latin adjectives narrowed in a way similar to English “gay” transitioning from a meaning of “happy” to “homosexual”?

The English words "gay" and "queer" are originally adjectives with a broad range of possible use contexts, but currently they are used almost exclusively in reference to certain minorities. It has ...
2
votes
1answer
101 views

What to call an old people's service home?

When an elderly person is no longer capable of or willing to live on their own, they can choose to move something I would call a "service home"1. Such institutions offer a variety of services: ...
3
votes
0answers
31 views

Development of the figurative meaning of derivare

If I understand correctly, derivare means literally "to lead water from a river" (from rivus). L&S gives examples of this literal meaning, but it also lists figurative uses. Only the figurative ...
7
votes
2answers
93 views

How to say “suit yourself”?

How to translate "suit yourself"? I'm curious as to how it translates to Latin. In certain contexts, it can come off as rude or sarcastic, even though, it's used in formal conversations and is not ...
8
votes
2answers
110 views

Is there a difference between the future participle and the supine accusative?

The purpose of motion can be expressed in several ways. For example, I would consider the following essentially equivalent (did I forget something?): Ille me salutatum Romam venit. Ille me ...
6
votes
1answer
64 views

Do adverbs derived from iste have a pejorative tone?

I would call the pronoun iste a "second person demonstrative pronoun"1, meaning roughly "that thing near you". It can also have a pejorative tone, implying that the speaker does not approve of the ...
7
votes
3answers
173 views

What is the difference between present and perfect conjunctive in hesitation?

I recently said this in our chat room: Ita crediderim, sed certus non sum. A brief discussion ensued about my choice of tense. I wanted to express hesitation, and my gut feeling says that the ...
7
votes
4answers
129 views

Word for “fumo” but less thick, thin smoke

"Fumo" means "I smoke, steam or fume". But is there a word which indicates a thinner smoke or fume rises from me? I'm looking for a word that incense could say about itself.
5
votes
1answer
336 views

ergo vs. itaque

As I understand it, both ergo and itaque mean therefore, thus, so, accordingly, etc. When should one be preferred over the other? Does it depend on context, or do they mean slightly different things?
8
votes
1answer
148 views

How to translate the Finnish “muka”?

I would like to know how to translate the Finnish particle or adverb "muka" or "mukamas" into Latin. Pitkäranta's Finnish–Latin–Finnish dictionary offers the translations ut dicitur, ...
7
votes
1answer
128 views

Can adjectives describe any noun in a sentence?

As long as the adjective matches its noun in case, number, and gender, is it possible to move the adjective anywhere in a sentence, even outside of prepositional phrases and subordinating or ...
13
votes
4answers
1k views

French and Latin “s'il te/vous plaît”

The phrases si tibi placet and si vobis placet can be found in Latin literature, but they are not particularly common. At least superficially they correspond to the French "s'il te plaît" and "s'il ...
11
votes
2answers
375 views

How to use immo?

What does the word immo really mean and how can I use it? I read this and this dictionary entry, and I was left confused. Some of the uses I can understand, but some I cannot. Either I do not have ...
5
votes
1answer
101 views

Using “sáné” v. “certé” v. “profectó”?

The dictionary definitions of these three words aren't particularly helpful in figuring out when to use which one. Lewis Elementary's definition of sáné includes indeed, doubtless, by all means,...
7
votes
1answer
167 views

Flavor/meaning/nuance of “aliquando” in “tandem aliquando”?

The first sentence of Cicero's second Catilinarian reads in part Tandem aliquando, Quirites, L. Catilinam . . . ex urbe . . . ejecimus. (I realize I'm leaving out all the fun parts; forgive me.) ...
7
votes
2answers
280 views

Is there a difference between septimana and hebdomas?

My dictionary gives two translations for "week": septimāna and hebdomas (gen. hebdomadis, feminine). Is there a difference between these two words? Are there contexts where only one of them is ...
9
votes
3answers
241 views

Semantic differences between verbs of thinking

Latin has lots of verbs which can be translated as "think", including puto, opinor, arbitror, existimo, reor, censeo, cogito, and doubtless many others. How might one get a handle on the semantic ...
10
votes
2answers
2k views

Which verb for drinking is least related to alcohol?

In English, like in many other languages, "to drink" often means "to drink alcohol". I dislike this connotation, and I would like to be able to talk about drinking with minimal alcoholic connotations. ...
14
votes
1answer
299 views

Are there dictionaries that translate profanities profanely?

Sometimes I come across Latin profanities, for example when reading a certain poem of Catullus. Many dictionaries fail to translate profanities properly, perhaps in order to maintain a certain level ...
11
votes
2answers
444 views

How does the Latin of these two translations of The Little Prince compare?

There are two translations of The Little Prince into Latin, one by Auguste Haury and one by Franz Schlosser. I'm trying to get a sense of the relative merits of their Latin. Here's the dedication of ...
16
votes
1answer
599 views

How can I use “quippe” properly?

Lewis & Short gives the following definition: surely, certainly, to be sure, by all means, indeed, in fact certainly, indeed, forsooth for, for in fact for, because, inasmuch as for ...
7
votes
1answer
212 views

What are some examples of “subicio” being used to mean “submit, subject, present”?

In English, the epigraph of A Christmas Carol reads I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with ...
7
votes
1answer
80 views

Can “simultas” simply mean “task,” or does it always connote hostility?

In his tale of Æetes, Hyginus writes Itaque Æeta Jasoni hanc simultatem constituit: Si vellet pellem auratam auferre, tauros æripedes … jungeret … Lewis & Short gives this ...
10
votes
1answer
129 views

meaning of “non omnínó”

Omnínó is defined in Lewis Elementary as altogether, wholly, entirely, utterly, at all [with numerals] in all, altogether, only, but, just by all means, indeed, doubtless, yes, certainly,...
20
votes
2answers
374 views

Is there a way to make a sentence ironic in Latin?

Is there a way (spoken or written) to make a phrase sound ironic in Latin? For example "good for you" would be "tibi bonum est"? Could there be intonation or another word to make it sound ironic?
5
votes
1answer
46 views

“Ne . . . quidem” in Noctes Atticæ

In the preface to Noctes Atticæ, Gellius writes Nos vero, ut captus noster est, incuriose et inmeditate ac prope etiam subrustice ex ipso loco ac tempore hibernarum vigiliarum Atticas Noctes ...
11
votes
1answer
175 views

What's the difference between coniunctivus and subiunctivus?

I was thrown off by a recent question that talked about the "conjunctive" mood, which I had never heard of. A few searches of William Whitaker's Words reveals that both coniunctivus (or conjunctivus) ...
7
votes
1answer
42 views

What nuances distinguish statuó, cónstituó, and ínstituó?

I'm asking mostly in the context of living Latin and trying to figure out how to say things like "I decided," "I started a blog," "I set up an organization," "I instituted a policy," and so on, for ...
13
votes
2answers
1k views

What does “quidem” REALLY mean?

The Lewis Elementary Latin Dictionary (via latinlexicon.org) gives the following definitions: quidem [expressing emphasis or assurance] assuredly, certainly, in fact, indeed [in answers] ...
11
votes
1answer
2k views

The word *quick* in Latin

There are many words, which are translated as quick. My initial search showed celer: swift , quick, rapid; in a bad sense, hasty, rash celox: swift , quick; f. as subst. a swift vessel, yacht citus: ...
8
votes
1answer
58 views

What nuances distinguish “minor” and “ínstó” when they mean “threaten”?

The prefix of ínstó seems to suggest pressure or movement in a way that minor doesn't, but is that suggestion borne out in their actual use? Quí minátur quasi fíxus est, quí ínstat in aliquem movet?
12
votes
2answers
1k views

What's the difference between nam and enim?

Both nam and enim are generally defined as meaning "for," the only difference between them being that nam comes first in a clause and that enim is postpositive (i.e., it comes second). Is there a ...
9
votes
2answers
182 views

What nuances distinguish sed/vērō/vērum as words for “but”?

I've seen sed, vērō, and vērum described as "but, butter, buttest," but the descriptions in e.g. Gildersleeve, Bennett—even Zumpt—leave me scratching my head.
16
votes
2answers
114 views

What is the difference in meaning or nuance between 'premō' and 'imprimō' in the sense of 'I press'?

Wiktionary shows that both premō and imprimō can mean (among other things) "I press." Looking at the formation of the latter word, the prefix im-, can negate the root word. How this applies to this ...