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Questions tagged [science]

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3
votes
1answer
55 views

Can “libella maris” be “sea level”?

I came across the expression libella maris in a scientific text from 19th century. There are many ways to parse it in the context, and one option that occurred to me is that maybe it stands for "sea ...
5
votes
0answers
86 views

Does the phrase “orbis terrarum” reflect Ancient Roman knowledge that the Earth is a sphere?

Does the phrase orbis terrarum reflect Ancient Roman knowledge that the Earth is a sphere? Some kinds of evidence that might suggest an answer: Did people say orbis terrarum for the world before they ...
4
votes
1answer
179 views

How to translate machine learning?

Machine learning is a roughly method where a machine learns to perform a certain task by learning on its own. The machine gains experience and can solve a very specific problem intuitively. It is not ...
6
votes
2answers
189 views

Is Kant's “De Mundi Sensibilis atque Intelligibilis Forma et Principiis” available online in its Latin original?

Question. Is Kant's "De Mundi Sensibilis atque Intelligibilis Forma et Principiis" available online in its Latin original? Remarks. Rather unbelievably, it seems to me that the answer is currently ...
4
votes
0answers
83 views

Is Pluto a planet(a)?

Judging by Lewis and Short (and other sources), planeta means a wandering star and was borrowed from Greek. Apparently the word is post-classical, and the classical expression is stellae errantes/...
7
votes
3answers
215 views

How should particle names ending in -on be treated in Latin?

There are many particle names ending in -on in English: electron, muon, lepton, proton… How should these particle names behave in Latin? My impression is that the electron and the proton came ...
5
votes
3answers
104 views

English adjective derived from Latin for “per equal amount of datapoints”

I'm not completely sure if this is the correct place to ask this, but let's try. Many thanks in advance. I would like to invent a term for an average per equal amount of (sorted) data. With that I ...
8
votes
1answer
82 views

Descriptions of aurora borealis

I saw a nice show of aurora borealis (or northern lights) last night, during the last two hours of 2016. Such shows are more common up north, and should be a rare occurrence in the Mediterranean. This ...
11
votes
1answer
158 views

Translating Scientific Latin

For my high school English class, which is a translation "workshop," we're all expected to give class-long, individual sessions focusing around a translation we've performed from whatever language we ...
10
votes
1answer
632 views

Colors of the rainbow

The classical Latin word for a rainbow seems to be Iris (Iris or Iridis, f.). Did the Romans ever list or otherwise discuss the colors of the rainbow in extant literature? I asked about colors in ...
11
votes
1answer
72 views

Rupes Recta, The Straight Wall, Correct Translation

Rupes recta is the name given to a feature on the Moon. This feature is also known as the straight wall or straight cliff. Is rupes recta the correct Latin phrase for straight wall or straight cliff? ...
8
votes
1answer
103 views

Did the Romans have a definition for a species of organism?

In today's taxonomy animals, plants and other organisms are organized in species. Defining a species is no simple task for modern biologists, but we have a fair understanding of what a species ...
19
votes
1answer
401 views

Why did scientists abandon Latin in their publications?

Whereas the Latin language was used by almost every scientist until the 18th century, this is a fact that since then the use of Latin in scientific publication has fastly decreased: the best example ...
13
votes
2answers
216 views

How to read mathematics out loud?

Reading symbolic mathematical expressions out loud in any language is mainly folklore: everyone in the field knows how to do it but finding explicit written instructions is surprisingly hard. I have ...
5
votes
4answers
469 views

How to describe collaboration?

I am looking for ways to describe collaboration in Latin. My main interest is scientific collaboration, if the type matters. I would like to have both a verb "to collaborate" and a noun "collaboration"...
7
votes
1answer
136 views

“With respect to” in mathematics

The expression "with respect to" is common in mathematics. Consider these example sentences: The derivative of x^2y with respect to y is x^2. Let us reflect the point A with respect to the line L and ...
16
votes
2answers
430 views

What is the history of scientific Latin?

Scientists up until the mid-19th century (e.g., Gauss) would frequently write scientific works in Latin. What sort of Latin would it be considered? Would Gauss's writings, for example, be considered ...
9
votes
2answers
346 views

In vitro, in vivo, in situ, in simulacris mathematicis? Any good alternatives to the latter?

There is a series of Latin and pseudo-Latin phrases used in a scientific context (mostly in the life sciences) describing how and where a study was carried out (sorted by frequency): in vitro – in a ...
15
votes
1answer
554 views

What are the origins of the two Latin names for boron, borium and boracium?

On Latin Wikipedia, there are a number of chemical elements with two Latin names, e.g. boron being borium and boracium. (Another example being nitrogen: nitrogenium or azotum.) What is the etymology ...