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4
votes
1answer
36 views

Idiomatic phrasing of “to the [cardinal direction] of [something]”

I am currently writing a small geography of the Roman Empire at its greatest extent (in the year 117 AD, under Emperor Trajan) in an effort to practice my composition skills. So far everything has ...
7
votes
1answer
718 views

Translation of a phrase “Catch the moment, …” to Latin

I hope someone who speaks Russian could help me in translating a phrase "Лови момент. Цени мгновение." into Latin. I'm afraid the original meaning could be lost or transformed if I translate it to ...
11
votes
1answer
107 views

Ūtāturne linguā Latīnā aliquis adverbō “ferē” ut linguā Anglicā verbō “almost” ūtitur?

Linguā Anglicā, saepe cum multīs adverbīs atque adiectīvīs, plūrima quōrum significātiōnēs absolūtās habent (exempla sunt "always" vel "everything" vel "nothing" vel "never", et cētera), adverbō "...
4
votes
2answers
162 views

How do I say “everything started here”?

I would like like to translate "everything started here" in Latin. Would omni coepia hinc work?
4
votes
1answer
45 views

Latin phrases adopting an imprecise/incorrect meaning in English (or other languages)

Before staring learning Latin, I was already acquainted with many Latin expressions accommodated to Spanish (and English). Typical examples are ex ante, ex post, vice versa, et cetera, etc. Now that ...
6
votes
1answer
32 views

Latin phrase that means, dissolve and reintegrate

A couple of months ago, I heard this story of a demon or some entity that was cursed to eternally break something down and reintegrate it together. There is even a photo of the demon crying in the ...
3
votes
2answers
95 views

How would you say “see me” in latin?

In the context of being a person that is ignored by others, how would you say "see me" in Latin?
6
votes
1answer
37 views

Adding translation of “potential” to “ad infinitum”

The phrase "ad infinitum" is often used in texts that are otherwise non-Latin. I would like to use a variation of this phrase in an English text. In philosophy of mathematics there is a distinction, ...
4
votes
1answer
37 views

How do I negate an ut clause of result?

Ut clauses of result are excellent for saying "so ___ that". But what if I wanted to reverse this and say "not ___ enough to"? For example, tam strenue laborābam ut epistolās centum scripserim means "...
5
votes
2answers
70 views

How would I say “as long as”?

Suppose I want to write about Meleager, fated to live exactly as long as a certain branch of wood lasts (no longer, no shorter). Or perhaps I'm writing about Cincinnatus, who agreed to hold power as ...
8
votes
2answers
41 views

What is a good deed?

Suppose I wanted to talk about good deeds. Generally this means acts done by someone for selfless reasons, solely to benefit others. For a literal translation I could go with bona facta, but the ...
6
votes
1answer
43 views

How might I write a latin phrase for swapping bodies?

Putting together a small literary piece where an item is inscribed with a Latin phrase that hints that it can be used to swap bodies (or minds, depending, I suppose, on your perspective) with another ...
6
votes
1answer
71 views

Quōmodo verba “in my opinion” Latīnē loquī?

In colloquial English (particularly in online discourse) the phrase "in my opinion" (often abbreviated as "imo/IMO") is quite common. I am wondering how one might express this in an idiomatic manner ...
3
votes
5answers
110 views

Translating “child of freedom”

How would I translate the phrase “child of freedom" in feminine form?
5
votes
1answer
55 views

How to phrase “it took two hours”?

In English or Finnish I can express the time it took to complete something in two ways, but in Latin only one: E: "I did it in two hours." F: "Tein sen kahdessa tunnissa." L: Duabus horis id perfeci. ...
4
votes
1answer
161 views

“What are you up to?”

I would like a Latin phrase to ask what the other person is doing at the moment. For example, it would not be unusual for me in chat to first say "hi" and then ask what the other person is doing. I ...
7
votes
1answer
423 views

“There is” in Latin

In English you use the phrasal verb there+[to be] to mean something different than just an object being placed somewhere visible or known to the speaker and/or listener (i.e., there). According to ...
2
votes
0answers
38 views

What is “sense of humour” in Latin?

What would be a good classical Latin translation of "sense of humour"? I can find words for "humour", but I am not sure how to go about "sense of". Would one of the humour words be adequate on its own ...
3
votes
0answers
39 views

Idiom like “Fair enough!”

If someone disagrees with you and the argument makes you change your opinion, you might say "Fair enough!" in English. This seems to be essentially equivalent to "Oh, good point! I agree." Is ...
3
votes
1answer
31 views

Can I use abesse with hinc, inde, and others?

Is it idiomatic in classical Latin to combine the verb abesse with hinc, inde, or other such pronouns meaning "from somewhere"? This is surely an at least intelligible way to say "to be away from here/...
3
votes
0answers
48 views

How to speak a language with a third declension adjective?

Most Latin adjectives related to names of countries and languages are of first and second declension: Latinus, Graecus, Anglicus… If I want to express that I speak in any such language, I will ...
6
votes
3answers
468 views

How to say “well done”?

Is there a Latin phrase similar to the English "well done!" to be used to congratulate someone for achieving something? Translating from English, one might expect bene factum! or bene fecisti! or ...
4
votes
1answer
78 views

Arx celebris fontibus

I bought yesterday a bottled mineral water, of the Harrogate brand, which label states: Harrogate's motto 'Arx celebris fontibus' translates as 'a citadel famous for its springs'. (this is the ...
11
votes
2answers
2k views

How to say “please pray for me” in ecclesiastical latin?

I know that ora pro me means "pray for me", but how would I express my request politely, such as in the English equivalent "Please pray for me" ?
5
votes
5answers
494 views

Touching emotionally

In English or Finnish I can say that I was touched by something or an experience was touching, meaning that I was touched emotionally, not physically. How can I express the same in Latin? Does tangere ...
4
votes
3answers
219 views

Is there a Latin source for “He who is able to laugh at himself, is invincible”?

Some time ago I came across a Latin sentence that roughly came down to: "He who is able to laugh at himself, is invincible" At the time I thought: Oh well, this must be a well known Roman saying (...
6
votes
2answers
60 views

How would one convey “a snowball's chance in hell” in Latin?

As a good pessimist, I frequently wish to humorously convey extremely low probabilities. I'll often use the phrase "a snowball's chance in hell," or a variation of it, to express this: There's a ...
5
votes
1answer
28 views

How to express one thing is more important than another?

How to express that one thing is more important in Latin? As an example, voice of the people over voice of the king can be stated in Latin as Vox populi supra vox regis. I interested in expressing ...
6
votes
0answers
39 views

Do any Latin authors preserve Etruscan quotations?

Many Latin and a few Greek phrases are now used in English, even by people who don't necessarily know the original language, as proverbs, phrases, mottos, and so on. Many short fragments from ancient ...
3
votes
2answers
223 views

“Quemcunque miserum videris nominem scias”

Can someone help me find the meaning of this phrase? Quemcunque miserum videris nominem scias.
5
votes
1answer
129 views

How to say that you were just kidding?

It is not unusual to attempt to say something humorous but it is mistaken for as serious statement. In this situation I might say "Just kidding!", "I wasn't serious!", "it was a joke!", or something ...
7
votes
1answer
69 views

How to describe qualifications?

I recently obtained formal qualifications to teach Latin (and mathematics and physics) in a number of Finnish schools and I got my diploma yesterday. How should I go about expressing this in Latin? Is ...
3
votes
1answer
50 views

An idiom for a young-looking older person

How can I say idiomatically in classical Latin that someone is old but still looks young? Should I say bene senuit ("he has aged well"), should I use a participle like bene reservatus/retentatus, or ...
12
votes
2answers
95 views

Is the usage of “id est” in Latin exactly like the usage of “i.e.” or “that is” in English?

There was a question a little while back on the English SE asking about the "plural form of i.e." (unfortunately, it got closed because the author didn't clarify what they meant). While I was trying ...
4
votes
0answers
38 views

An idiom for “on the road”

I spend much of my time travelling, and that brings all kinds of challenges. For example, it can be hard to follow my preferred diet and I don't have access to my books. How could I express such ...
4
votes
2answers
83 views

Mock up of Coat of Arms

I want to make a coat of arms for my father in law, and we always refer to him doing anything with the phrase - "that'll do". Is there a Latin phrase that this translates to? Google translate has ...
6
votes
3answers
358 views

Where does the phrase “mors omnia solvit” come from?

A couple of years ago I stumbled across the phrase "mors omnia solvit", and I got the impression that it was a rather well establihed saying. Now I started to research the source of this phrase (for ...
4
votes
3answers
251 views

What is the correct way to write “The Prince's Book” in Latin?

Greetings Latin StackExchange. One of my hobbies is to write stories and in one of my stories I would like to incorporate an item called "The Prince's Book". My ideal goal is that this item is written ...
5
votes
1answer
58 views

A thing of flesh and blood

Jerome K. Jerome in the preface to his comic novel Three Men in a Boat tells us that his characters are not imaginary, but 'things of flesh and blood'. The best I can do so far is the phrase sunt ...
2
votes
2answers
95 views

What is the Latin expression for “day one”?

What is the Latin expression for "day one", as expressed as the first day of the rest of your life?
3
votes
3answers
85 views

Translation of a phrase about unknown people into Latin

What would be the way to say that you don't care about people you don't know? Something like "I don't care about those I don't know" or "I ignore the faceless masses."
2
votes
2answers
47 views

Flags flying at half-mast

A well-known mathematician passed away recently, and I happened to be in the Trinity College on the day after. As any Cambridge college undoubtedly would, they mourned the loss of a fellow by flying ...
3
votes
2answers
100 views

Latin for 'at arm's length'

Idiomatically, the English expression 'at arm's length' means something like 'within sight, but avoiding any form of contact'. It can be used either physically or metaphorically. I'm trying hard to ...
4
votes
1answer
61 views

Spatial equivalent to extemporalis/intempestivus?

The term extemporalis refers unusual events in time, such as an exceptional snowstorm in spring time. I was wondering if there is an equivalent term which refers, not to a temporal aspect of an ...
4
votes
0answers
36 views

Attempting to preemptively disqualify retort

If I were to say: The sky is falling! It undeniably false to claim that I am overreacting, as my detractors are sure to do. Is there a common Latin phrase that encapsulates that, the tactic or ...
4
votes
1answer
37 views

A correct title for the book from the Evil Dead movies?

In the Evil Dead movies the infamous book is given an inconsistently spelled name, which vanished in the other installments. The scripts for the original movie and the remake titled it "Naturan ...
5
votes
2answers
93 views

Is there a colorful term for an uninvited guest?

Is there a colorful Latin term for an uninvited guest? Of course I can say something like conviva non invitatus, but I wonder if there is something less boring, akin to the English "gatecrasher" or ...
5
votes
1answer
65 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “solitō māiōre”?

A fellow member of a Latin Discord server I participate in posted this link to an article with a question regarding how one would interpret the phrase "solitō māiōre". Despite our efforts to interpret ...
6
votes
1answer
4k views

Is my interpretation of “Ad Astra per Aspera” correct?

I came across the phrase ad astra per aspera — "to the stars through difficulties." I think I know what it means, but my interpretation appears to be at odds with others. For example: The ...
5
votes
1answer
55 views

Can someone suggest a medical name conveying “idiopathic unfulfilled potential”?

The diagnosis of ADHD is effectively a clinical opinion that an individual is not reaching their full potential. It's also a claim about the underlying mechanism (being mediated by dopamine; a ...