Questions tagged [idiom]

For questions concerning expressions, word-plays, symbolic language, metaphors and the likes.

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6
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3answers
417 views

Translate “mind over body”

I should start by saying that my experience with latin extends as far as the fact that some words sound similar in italian, not much more. I'm trying to translate the idiom "mind over body", ...
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1answer
85 views

Use of “in” with ablative

I'm hoping someone can clarify the meaning of the medieval Latin phrase "in ipsa" when referring to a decision or action not being "in" or "upon" someone, which I assume ...
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1answer
109 views

What would be a proper reaction to the question: “Can you come over?” or how do you say “Coming” in Latin?

In a comment to this question, JoonasIlmavirta suggests a spin-off question. I have had this question simmering for quite some time, but this is a nice incentive. Consider the following cross-language ...
7
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1answer
113 views

Is there a more idiomatic way to say “to begin again”?

Incipere iterum seems like a very literal way to say "to begin again". Is there a more idiomatic way to say this? For additional context, when I think of this phrase, I think of something ...
3
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2answers
493 views

A Latin motto for SpaceX

Jeff Bezos company Blue Origin has a motto “Gradatim Ferociter” or Step by Step Ferociously, although they seem to take a very long time to do anything. Elon Musk also runs a rocket company (SpaceX). ...
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0answers
54 views

Roman wedding congratulations

How did the Romans congratulate a couple on their wedding day? The concepts of wedding and marriage were not quite what they are now back then, but I assume that celebrations and congratulations were ...
6
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2answers
190 views

Is there a Latin construction for a tentative question/suggestion analogous to “I wonder [question word]”?

At first, I thought "me rogo," but the dictionary did not confirm my suggestion. I think my German is interfering ("ich frage mich").
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1answer
93 views

How to say “dudes rock” in Latin?

I want to translate "dudes rock" into Latin. Google Translate and working with synonyms got me to viri sunt prodigiosus (“men are amazing” more or less?). But I'm wondering if there’s an ...
11
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1answer
671 views

Which is more correct, “status quo” or “statu quo”?

I always heard and read the expression "status quo" but I just found the alternative spelling "statu quo" in the Italian translation of Motivational Interviewing by Miller e ...
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4answers
918 views

“Wishful thinking” in Latin

How to express the that a scenario just mentioned is probably too-optimistic and unlikely to happen (and might merely reflect the hopes of one, rather than being grounded on evidence). phantasia comes ...
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1answer
1k views

How did the Romans congratulate a new father?

One of our users recently became a father and of course congratulations are in order. How did the Romans do that? More specifically, are there any attested congratulations to a new father in the ...
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3answers
4k views

Could one consider using Latin as a daily casual language these days?

I just saw a video asking like how would one say I just had an avocado toast and thought about some of the new stuff that didn't exist back then. How would we integrate new words into the Latin ...
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2answers
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How do you say “good morning” in Latin?

Are there different ways to say good morning in Latin? Would bene mane be okay?
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1answer
238 views

How is “as…as” to be Expressed in Latin?

In expressions e.g. "A change is as good as a rest."; "He was as good as his word."; how is the "as...as" part to be translated? I've found quid sicut bonum ("Word ...
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1answer
75 views

Looking for the most accurate translation of “Remember and Persevere”

I'm looking for a nice Latin phrase to put on my college class ring. Being honest: college was a pretty rough time for me, but I've pulled through a lot of hardships and I'm gonna be the first of my ...
7
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1answer
195 views

Maria mater Domini

The phrase "Maria mater Domini" appears in Pseudo-Papias Fragment X (A fragment attributed by J.B. Lightfoot to Papias of Lombardy, 1040s–1060s, author of the Elementarium Doctrinae ...
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2answers
129 views

Usage of fugio as an idiom to mean forget

I am confused how fugio is used grammatically when it is used idiomatically to mean forget. In Latin the regular word for forget is dedisco (to unlearn). However, usually the Latins used various ...
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1answer
250 views

What is Peniculus insinuating with his reference to Samian crockery?

Introduction and question Pl. Men. 1.2.71. Pēn. Metuis, crēdō, nē forēs sămiae sient. Pēniculus You fear, I believe, that the doors may be Samian*. * By [Henry Thomas Riley][1] translated as ‘of ...
4
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1answer
203 views

Two kinds of falling

The English verb "fall", when the subject is a human, has two main kinds of literal1 meaning as far as I can tell: A change of position: Moving suddenly from higher elevation to lower. (The ...
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2answers
109 views

How should the phrase “in question” be translated into Latin?

I want to translate the phrase "in question" into Latin, as in: Please deposit the car keys next to the car in question, and then leave by the main door. How would I express this?
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1answer
55 views

Is this correct Latin, substitution in an epigram?

I have never taken Latin, but I enjoy languages, and particularly pithy quotes. There is a legal principle De minimis non curat lex, which is usually translated as “the law is not concerned with ...
4
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1answer
255 views

How to say “Get well soon!”?

Salvete! My friend who loves Latin is sick and I want to tell him "Get well soon!" in Latin. Is sanesco the right verb to use here? Should I use the present or the future imperative (mox ...
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1answer
79 views

“Life decreed better!” in Latin

Sort of, related to my another qestion. I am looking for mo secular (for the lack of a better word) version of a phrase "Di melius!". While I know that deus could be interpreted as "...
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0answers
61 views

“From beyond the grave”

When someone does something after death — such as causing harm by their will — they can be said to act "from beyond the grave". Is there a similar idiom in Latin? Any era will do, although ...
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1answer
410 views

How does “quid causae” work grammatically?

I do not understand the grammar of quid causae = "[for] what cause", as in Nescio quid causae fuerit, cur nullas ad me litteras dares I do not know what the reason was why you sent me no ...
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1answer
160 views

UPDATE: How to translate “Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable?”

I am trying to translate the saying "Comfort the afflicted; afflict the comfortable" into Latin, but I don't actually know Latin, and I've run into a wall. I think the verbs should be ...
5
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1answer
622 views

How do I say “like a bull in a china shop”?

Searching, I found this page, which says "de armento in Sinis tabernam", which sounds to me like a (bad) literal word for word translation. How can I express the feelings behind the English ...
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1answer
442 views

Chasing Two Rabbits

While reading old Question: Two birds with one stone? I was reminded of the Russian expression: "A man who chases two rabbits will catch neither." In English we speak of the futility of &...
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1answer
861 views

“With all due respect” in Latin

Several sites, including the notorious Google Translate, have Salva pace to mean "with all due respect". However I could not confirm this from classical sources, yet we can find several ...
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2answers
1k views

“Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about.” in Latin

What would be the proper Latin translation of: Everyone you meet is fighting a battle you know nothing about. The author of the quote is uncertain and, as far as I can see, it is not a proverb or a ...
3
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1answer
198 views

Closest equivalent of “Don't get mad, get even” in Latin

I am looking for the closest equivalents of the following phrase in Latin: Don't get mad, get even. Preferably not a word-by-word translation, but an 'established' phrase or proverb.
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1answer
76 views

Translation of “Quasi non sit veritate”

Quasi non sit veritate. Searched and could not find anything. Thanks in advance to those that can help translating. This is from a “Tactical” training company.
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2answers
93 views

To throw is human

So, if To err is human translates to Errare humanum est what would be a good translation for To throw (a stone or projectile) is human I'm looking at proicere humanum est and mittere humanum est;...
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2answers
294 views

A proverb «Talk bad, talk nice about me, but just talk»

Once heard alike in Latin, which context was that of people seeking, even demanding a shabby popularity, reputation in any of its' forms. What would be a proper translation for that proverb? Edit: ...
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2answers
547 views

“Ready, Set, Go!” in Latin

How would you translate the common sport phrase into Latin. Here is my thought thus far: Ready. It usually used to mean "on your marks". But I would like to take it as "prepare!", ...
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3answers
1k views

Expression warning that some things can't be easily undone and one might want to think about this a while longer?

For example, a tattoo can semi-permanently mark two people, indicating their relationship. Human relationships and individual behavior are unpredictable compared to the permanence of tattoos. Of ...
4
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1answer
89 views

Case of “machina” in “Deus ex machina”?

According to https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/machina#Declension the case of "machina" only can be nominative, vocative or ablative. As the meaning of the phrase is "god descended on the ...
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2answers
67 views

Follow up “It's not a bug, it's a feature”

Following up Help translating "It's not a bug, it's a feature!"?, non erratum sed designatum came up as a great way to say "not a wrong step, but working as designed" as in ...
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1answer
3k views

Help translating “It's not a bug, it's a feature!”?

I know no Latin, but playing around with Google Translate I came up with "Non insectum opus est". Insectum seems like a good stand in for a generic bug, but maybe blatta is better (see http:/...
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2answers
2k views

How to say “To serve, not to be served” in Latin?

I would like to know how to translate the phrase "To serve, not to be served" in Latin. It doesn't have to be a word for word translation. But, I want to know the phrase that would give the ...
4
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2answers
207 views

How do you say “one more [something]”?

Answers to the question Latin version of "non ho che un" or "je n'ai qu'un" suggest that English more than one can be translated to Latin as plus unum (even though there ...
6
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1answer
708 views

How to say “Happy Sabbath”

In our community we use to say "Happy Sabbath" or "Have a Blessed Sabbath" which have the same sense like "Shabbat Shalom", regarding to Saturday as the day of rest. What ...
2
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1answer
115 views

¿Was “grosso modo” popularised from Latin or Italian?

Grosso modo is a phrase of Latin origin, meaning "approximately". The phrase has been adopted in many languages (like English, French, Dutch, etc), as the referred link testifies. The ...
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4answers
224 views

Latin version of “non ho che un” or “je n'ai qu'un”

At least Italian and French have an idiomatic way to say "I have only one friend": Non ho che un amico. Je n'ai qu'un ami. Finnish has the same thing: "Minulla ei ole kuin yksi ystävä....
3
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1answer
240 views

“Once upon a time”

The English phrase "once upon a time" at the beginning of a story immediately sets the genre and style to a great extent. Is there a similar device, possibly a phrase, in Latin? It does not ...
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1answer
3k views

Is this translation for “If I cannot move Heaven, I will raise Hell.” correct?

I want to make sure this is the correct translation for “If I cannot move Heaven, I will raise Hell.” Flectere si nequeo superos, Acheronta noveno.
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2answers
6k views

Feminine case 3rd-person version of “Veni, vidi, vici”

How does the famous saying: Veni, vidi, vici. have to be changed so that it describes a female person, such as in English: She came, she saw, she conquered. Reversing Google Translate gives ...
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0answers
108 views

What fresh hell is this?

“What fresh hell is this?” is a question frequently uttered (or so it has been reported) by writer Dorothy Parker, on such occasions as when the doorbell or the telephone rang, expressing her ...
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2answers
274 views

What is the source of the Greek phrase πύξ, λάξ, δάξ?

πύξ, λάξ, δάξ "by punching, kicking, and biting" is described by Wikipedia as an "epigram describing how laypersons were chased away from the Eleusinian Mysteries". Where is this ...
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0answers
83 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...

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