Questions tagged [english-to-latin-translation]

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8
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1answer
62 views

How to introduce a new topic in conversation (like “by the way”, “speaking of”)?

In English we can use "by the way" to introduce a topic that not related to the previous one. Or we can use "speaking of"/"apropos" when we are using a theme just mentioned to introduce a related ...
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2answers
67 views

Translation of prayer from English to Latin

I wanted to translate this sentence from my daily prayer to Latin, and wonder whether the construction of the phrase is correct, in terms of grammar. "Da panem, Domine, quibus esuriunt, et fame ...
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1answer
65 views

As X came, Y deftly stepped aside

I was wondering, in a sentence where you have the following structure: As he came, Julius deftly stepped aside Would you express this with dum, or with a participle, or with cum/postquam, while ...
3
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1answer
75 views

“Man to Man” in Latin?

I've been spending a lot of time on this one but not quite sure how you would preserve the idiomatic connotation of the phrase "man to man". I'm planning to use it in a sentence like "they were ...
4
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4answers
107 views

What do you call a mind bender in Latin?

There is a video game character called mind bender. Among other things, he can make an enemy unit run over to your side, that is, turn a foe into friend. That's why he can bend their minds. What ...
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2answers
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Help with translation “I choose myself”

I would like to get a small tattoo with the phrase "I choose myself" meaning I choose myself first before anything and anyone else. I would like to have it done in Latin, so it is a bit less obvious ...
7
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2answers
253 views

Can a predicate nominative ever be a different gender from the subject?

I want to say "My favorite animal is..." and then give the animal. But "animal" is neuter, so I'll end up with a predicate nominative that doesn't agree in gender with the subject! "Meum dilectum ...
4
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1answer
59 views

How would I say “From the mind of” in latin?

I'm making a journal for my girlfriend and would like to put "from the mind of [name]" on the front page. Sort of a play on "ex libris". If that doesn't really work, or sounds odd, "[name]'s thoughts" ...
4
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1answer
86 views

A Royal Title for a Fictional King

So, I'm trying to make a royal title in Latin for a fictional king. I tried to model it heavily after Queen Elizabeth II's royal title to keep myself as accurate as possible and I came up with: ...
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1answer
37 views

Translation check: “Give in not to apathy, but humanity”

Would ne cede apathia sed humanitate be a sensical translation of "give in not to apathy, but humanity"? I am trying to keep this as few words as possible but without sounding too abrupt. I was also ...
2
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2answers
42 views

Translation check of “Through Empire comes Peace” and “Power of the Emperor”

I have a title, "Power of the Emperor" and motto "Through Empire comes Peace" that I am translating to classical Latin. I'm fairly confident of the vocabulary choices but less so of my conjugations ...
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0answers
42 views

Were there common Latin stutter words? [duplicate]

In English, we say often say 'um' when we're trying to think about the next word to say. In Japanese it's 'anno.' Is there a known phrase like this in Latin?
4
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1answer
109 views

Translate compound word “airship” to Latin

Is there a more idiomatic way to translate "airship" than something like navis aeris (maybe this already is natural to a native speaker)? A compound word like "Airship" in English feels like a more ...
7
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1answer
76 views

How do you express “All Suffering” or “Everything Is Pain” with the omni- prefix?

I'd like to know the equivalent of omniscient but for pain instead of knowledge. Are omnidolens or omnipassionis correct (they couldn't be)? Thank you for your time.
5
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1answer
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I have two translations of “Inspiring Future Leaders”

We are a school and are looking to create a new motto in latin. We want it to say "Inspiring future leaders" but have been given two different translations by two different people! Inspirare Futuri ...
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2answers
105 views

How would the Romans have borrowed the word “Dune”?

Following up on my previous question about a latin word for "dunes", how would the Romans have adopted and latinized a word of Germanic origin like "dune"? I found a few examples of similar sounding ...
5
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1answer
453 views

Is there a Latin word for “dune”?

Did the Romans have a word for "dune", as in sand dunes? There are plenty of words relating to sand itself, but I can't find anything specifically about dunes. There is a placed called Arenae Montes (...
4
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1answer
62 views

From awareness to action in Latin

Salve! I am trying to say "From awareness to action" and translated it as "Conscientia est actio" - Is that correct? I am creating an organization where I teach skills to be more aware and take ...
0
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1answer
80 views

How would I translate the future passive for the verb Video, videre: to see? [closed]

I have to decline video, videre: to see in the future tense. Active and passive and then translate it. I am having a problem with the translation.
1
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1answer
67 views

What was the classical era word for a bastard?

If a Roman wanted to call another Roman a "bastard", what word would they use? I am curious about both the literal and general usage of the word, so calling someone an illegitimate child and also just ...
5
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3answers
1k views

Latin Translation for “Death to the enemies of mankind”

I'd like to translate "Death to the enemies of mankind" into Latin. How can I do that? If there are multiple ways of saying it, I would like it structured as close to a motto as possible, since that's ...
6
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2answers
951 views

Latin Phrase for “It goes without saying”

The title of the question pretty much sums it up. I am looking for a Latin phrase for the English expression "It goes without saying." I am not sure if an analogous expression exists- although I would ...
2
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1answer
82 views

Translate “Before the Fire” and “After the Fire” into Classical Latin

I am translating the phrases "Before the Fire" and "After the Fire" into Classical Latin. These are used for dating in a fashion similar to how B.C.E./B.C. and C.E./A.D. are used for dates in the ...
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3answers
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Translation of “One who leads the way”

I have a grad student as a Latin teacher. I don't feel comfortable addressing him as teacher, magister, or any other title because he doesn't really command his classroom. Rather, he guides us in ...
3
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1answer
91 views

Best Latin translation of an English Phrase “Always Present, Never Seen”

I am designing some potential products for my organization, and I want to include a version that includes a tag line written in Latin of one of the our organizational values. The phrase I'm looking ...
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2answers
1k views

Latin for “In war and in peace”

I remember reading long ago a pithy Latin expression for “in war and peace,” or “in war as in peace,” or something to that effect. The idea is that one might say, for example, that a certain truth ...
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6answers
131 views

How do you say “I have constant value” in Latin?

I'm mostly struggling with the "I have" portion as well as the actual layout of the sentence in Latin. Even though every website seems to have a different Latin equivalent for English words, and ...
5
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1answer
45 views

What are the proper terms for students?

I'm curious about appropriate terms for students. What should I call somebody in: Primary school Secondary school College/university undergraduate program College/university postgraduate program
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1answer
28 views

What are the proper terms for highly-educated people?

I'm curious about terms that can be used to describe these people, or the qualifications themselves: College/university graduate Somebody with a "Master's" qualification Somebody with a "Doctorate" ...
5
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1answer
266 views

Is there a Latin equivalent of “lady”?

In English the word "lady" generally carries a positive connotation - that's why Aung San Suu Kyi is also referred to as "The Lady". I'm wondering if Latin has an equivalent for "lady". Google ...
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3answers
63 views

Translating “scholar in residence”

I’m looking for a Classical Latin translation of “scholar in residence,” like at a university. Google translate says “scholar in residentiae,” but I want to make sure this is correct. Thanks in ...
10
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1answer
870 views

How to translate “what” when used as an ironic interjection

Is there any good way to translate "what" when used as an ironic interjection, e.g. "What? He thought that would be a good idea?" said in a sarcastic tone? My first thought is just to use quis or quid ...
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2answers
754 views

How can we say “not even wrong” in Latin?

The phrase "not even wrong" is thought to have originated from Wolfgang Pauli. The phrase was allegedly spoken in German before becoming a meme: Das ist nicht nur nicht richtig; es ist nicht einmal ...
2
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1answer
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Modification of my Scottish Clan Motto (luceo non uro)

I am in the process of planning out a tattoo, and I want to get my family's clan motto. The Mackenzie Clan motto is Luceo Non Uro Which as I understand translates to "shine not burn." That said, ...
4
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1answer
122 views

Idiomatic translation for family motto from English

When working on an improved version of our clan's crest, it was decided to add the motto (which had so far been absent from the design). The motto in English is "no time for caution". Related ...
6
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3answers
129 views

How do you say to “bear in mind” or to always “keep in mind” in Latin?

Self explanatory question. Okay so I know the word ‘remember’ in Latin is ‘memento.’ but I heard that there are different variations like meminero or something, but is there a way to say “to keep in ...
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0answers
19 views

Translation of “to have consequences”

What is the best Latin translation of "This will have consequences.", as in "what has transpired will affect the future"?
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2answers
2k views

Wifi or Wireless fidelity in Latin?

Salvē! I am new here and searched the questions, but could not find anything. In another site somebody suggested: interrete trans spiritum, but this seems too long. Maybe a catchy abbreviation such as ...
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0answers
34 views

Translate into Latin: “To will the impossible” and “with will and sacrifice”

Hello and thank you in advance. Two phrases I am interested being in Latin: "To will the impossible" and "With will and sacrifice" First one being similar to "If there is a will, there's a way." ...
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3answers
80 views

What is the Latin and Greek phrase or word for golden chariot?

I am currently writing about the ancient Greek and Roman gods, and I am looking to find the correct phrase for a chariot drawn by four horses made of gold. The closest I have come using google is ...
3
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1answer
183 views

Body piercing in Latin

I have a friend who is heavily into body modification (don't ask) and classical philology (teaches college-level Latin) who recently got an, uh, dressing ring. (All beating around the bush aside, I've ...
4
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1answer
132 views

The Sands of Time

In the museum at the Roman fort of Vindolanda (Northumberland, England) there is a paving flagstone bearing a dog's pawprints. An itinerant, mischievous dog had the temerity to walk over wet, Roman ...
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2answers
100 views

Accusative vs ablative

I am trying to translate the following phrase into Latin: "Be ready to change your goals but never change your values". I've got up to "Esto parata mutare propositos tuos sed numquam mutare valores ...
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2answers
72 views

What is Art's Mind in Latin?

I looked at Natura Artis Magistra ("nature is art's teacher"), so I think mens artis is the correct translation of "Art's Mind". How to translate "Art's Mind" (with art in the sense above) to Latin?
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3answers
1k views

Translate “Exit Smiling” into Classical Latin

I am trying to translate the phrase "exit smiling" into Classical Latin to use as message above the front door of our home (on the inside before leaving). The phrase is from 'Catch 22'. Is "smiling" ...
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0answers
54 views

Would this make sense?

So soon I'm getting a tattoo to say live without regret. I've pottered around on the internet a bit and found Sine Paenitentia Vive / Vive sine Paenitentia for this. I assume this is correct. I ...
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1answer
126 views

How do you say “hunt or be hunted” or “hunt lest you be hunted” in Latin?

I found that neca ne neceris means "kill lest you be killed" and would like to modify this to "hunt lest you be hunted." It looks like venor is the verb for "hunting" but I'm not sure what the proper ...
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1answer
45 views

Translation for “Mortal willpower” (Tattoo idea!)

Or anything to a similar effect! I was also considering something along the lines of Strength beyond Gods or Willpower beyond Gods/Willpower that transcends the gods But, the original title phrase ...
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1answer
62 views

How can I say “school/university of life” in Latin?

I want to translate "school/university of life" into Latin. Meaning, where you learn about life. Thank you in advance.
4
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1answer
106 views

Is a translation from modern English to Latin meaningful?

First time visitor to the Latin Language SE. My attention was caught by this question: How does “It's totally fucked” translate to Latin? It wasn't the vulgarity that grabbed me though, it was the ...

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