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Is “que” or “et” better for a “God and Family” tattoo?

Hi I’m planning to have a tattoo and I would like to have a translation in Latin of “God and Family”. Which one is appropriate, "deo et familia" or "deo familiaque"?
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2answers
53 views

Latin translation of ‘Strength, love and light’

I know people tend to advise against having tattoos in other languages but I have given it a lot of thought and definitely want it doing. I am hoping to have a tattoo that translates into ‘strength (...
3
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1answer
257 views

How do I do something “hard”?

"Hard" is sometimes used as an adverb in English to emphasize a physical action, or indicate that it was especially vigorous or forceful. For example, "he hit the ground hard when he fell", or "she ...
3
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1answer
33 views

How it's better to translate “The best house” into Latin?

Can I use "Domus optima" or "Domus optimus" as the equivalent (I do not need a literal translation) of "The best house"? Should "optima" be used with a noun "domus" or both are correct?
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2answers
68 views

How would I say “as long as”?

Suppose I want to write about Meleager, fated to live exactly as long as a certain branch of wood lasts (no longer, no shorter). Or perhaps I'm writing about Cincinnatus, who agreed to hold power as ...
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2answers
54 views

Translating “From Man to Woman” into Latin

I want to title a poem "From Man to Woman" in the sense, addressed to woman, by man. While starting the poem, I had the phrase ad hominem/ad feminam in mind. My knowledge of Latin ends there. Google ...
5
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2answers
56 views

Translating “do the next thing” to Latin

I would like to use the phrase "do the next thing" as a motto for some literature. Does the translation FACITE DEINDE REM work? The thought is basically this: we should get active with the next thing ...
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0answers
28 views

Seeking simple Latin translation for motto “fire, flow, transcendence”

I am in a community of flow artists and fire performers. I'm putting together a "coat of arms" of sorts for this community, and would like to include a motto in Latin. The motto in English would be ...
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2answers
30 views

How can I say “passion for healing” in Latin?

Have no idea here. I translated it on google but yeah it's not that trustworthy I know. Somehow I found out the word "passio","ad" and "sanationem". We are going to use it as our school of medicine ...
4
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1answer
67 views

Translating: “Christ Jesus Ultimate King & Ruler for All Time”

I have considered that this may be stated: "Christī Regēns", emphasising with a capital R and being pronounced actively ruling. Is this sufficient to state? I wonder that is is not more like, "...
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1answer
47 views

Translating “Blood isn't always thicker than water.”

My step grandpa passed, and I want a tattoo in latin that says, "Blood isn't always thicker than water." I would greatly appreciate it if someone translates this.
6
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1answer
61 views

Quōmodo verba “in my opinion” Latīnē loquī?

In colloquial English (particularly in online discourse) the phrase "in my opinion" (often abbreviated as "imo/IMO") is quite common. I am wondering how one might express this in an idiomatic manner ...
6
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1answer
89 views

Does this text make sense?

I am writing a text to be sung by a small chorus for a recording, and I need a check on my Latin use, as I'm a less active student of the language than others, and don't entirely trust myself to nail ...
6
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2answers
74 views

Translating: “Know and understand this king. Be sure that you make yourself a disciple of Christ the ruling King.”

I am trying to write a motto and my knowledge of Latin is not very profound. I wish to state using Latin to the effect of, and using king rather than man: Know and understand this king. Be sure ...
3
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5answers
107 views

Translating “child of freedom”

How would I translate the phrase “child of freedom" in feminine form?
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0answers
46 views

A Series of Completed Events — or is it?

North & Hillard; Ex. 192, Q3: "While provisions held out they resisted all attacks.", is to be translated into Latin. The answer: "dum (quamdiu) frumentum suppetebat, omnibus oppugnationibus ...
5
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1answer
59 views

Is “ut ostendo sursum” an accurate Latin translation of “keep showing up”?

I'm hoping someone can help with confirming a translation, or suggesting an alternative, of “keep showing up” into Latin. Google translate and a few other online translators have suggested ut ostendo ...
6
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2answers
418 views

Correct paraphrase of “navigare necesse est” to “angling is necessary”?

Is 'piscantur necesse est' a correct adaptation of the well-known Plutarch maxim 'navigare necesse est'? I would like to say "angling is necessary", but I am unsure whether it remains correct after my ...
5
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3answers
582 views

What is the best way to translate 'remember' into Latin?

Id like to get a tattoo saying 'remember' but translated in Latin. I have learned that the translation depends on what message it would like to convoy with 'remember'. The message id like to convey ...
3
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1answer
33 views

Present or imperfect subjunctive in this translation exercise?

In North & Hillard; Ex 191, Q10: the student is required to translate: "He refused to fight until reinforcements came." An awkward one: the student has to remember to use "negavit" (he denied ...
5
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0answers
42 views

How can this English to Latin translation be improved?

I took a look at the chat and saw many comments in Latin, most of whom I could not decipher immediately. So I tried to point that out, and why not do it in Latin. The problem is that I have ...
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4answers
1k views

What would “high school” be in Latin?

There was a conversation between Joonas Ilmavirta and I in CONLOQVIVM, during which we attempted to figure out what the appropriate translation for the phrase "high school" (specifically of the ...
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1answer
38 views

“I am divided. I am balanced. I am one.”

I was hoping someone with more experience in Latin could help me confirm whether this translation is correct or not: Ego sum dividitur. Ego sum libratum. Ego sum unum. Does this translate properly ...
4
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1answer
57 views

Has “tribalis” ever been used in Latin?

I was recently looking up the etymologies of some obscure words related to the English word tribe (like the adjective tribual), and I came across a Wiktionary page that asserts that there is or was a ...
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2answers
45 views

How would one translate “The God-Machine”?

In the Chronicles of Darkness role-playing game, one of the major antagonists is called "the God-Machine": a machine so powerful it seems similar to a god. I know Latin generally prefers not to stick ...
4
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2answers
830 views

Translation of a Macklemore lyric

We are creating our own family crest, and would like a translation of a lyric "no freedom til we're equal". I've looked on Google Translate, but quickly realised it's going to end up reading like a ...
4
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1answer
65 views

Can I write 'Ecce Esse!'?

Is 'ecce esse!' acceptable Latin for 'Lo, to be!'? I've tried looking online for answers, but I've not found anything definitive either confirming or disconfirming that it is, though I do not have ...
5
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1answer
63 views

Three (very similar) mottoes and a general grammar question

Hope you guys don't mind helping me. I'm looking to translate three mottoes into Latin, and I think these are beyond my capability to naturally translate: Do not be too kind; do not be too angry; ...
5
votes
3answers
191 views

How would you say “Free Spirit” in Latin?

While I believe there may have not been a term of "Free Spirit" in Latin, if we were to translate it and retain its English meaning using Latin words, what would it be?
5
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2answers
63 views

Is “responsum est dilectio” the correct translation for “love is the answer”?

Is "responsum est dilectio" the correct translation for "love is the answer"? The translation comes from Google Translate, but I can't find any proof or usage of the sentence which kind of makes me a ...
9
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1answer
83 views

Tastes Like Chicken

What Latin I know I've sort-of assimilated from being fluent in Spanish and having some knowledge of French, as well as a life-long interest in English etymology (not a strong foundation for Latin, I ...
5
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1answer
44 views

Seeing The Wood For The Trees

North & Hillard Ex. 190; Q1: "While they were cutting down the wood the enemy came upon them." The answer: "dum silvam succidunt eos hostis adoritur." The instruction given by N & H, p.146: ...
6
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1answer
57 views

The proper phrase with “adeptus”

As far as I know adeptus means "the one who achieved something", in participial form. mēta means "goal" or "turning point", figuratively. What is the proper combination of them with the meaning "the ...
6
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2answers
67 views

Quōmodo rēctē “derivative of f(x)” dīcere?

I am currently struggling to figure out how to translate the following phrase: [...] derivative of f(x) [...] I had a couple of initial ideas, namely: dēductīva [fūnctiō] dē f(x) dēductīva ...
6
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1answer
47 views

Latin translation for “Forwards, into a standardized world”

I'm currently doing a project for which I'd love to use some Latin phrases as mottos. One of these would be "Forwards, into a standardized world". Using some dictionaries and wild guesswork, the best ...
6
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2answers
66 views

Cum plus Subjunctive

North & Hillard, Ex. 189; Q5:"The citizens were almost dead of starvation, when relief arrived." Answer: "cives fame paene mortui sunt cum auxilium advenit." Firstly, I put mortui erant - the-...
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1answer
68 views

Translation verification

I’m wondering whether my translation is correct. I wrote: tempus fugit; sed muscae fugiunt etiam. I meant for this to mean: Time flies, but flies fly too. I really don't have any knowledge ...
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2answers
2k views

How to say “please pray for me” in ecclesiastical latin?

I know that ora pro me means "pray for me", but how would I express my request politely, such as in the English equivalent "Please pray for me" ?
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2answers
97 views

What is the correct translation and usage of “sleep”?

I'm trying to helping out my friend to write a story, the story has a scene where there is Latin sentences which the only sentence that I suppose to be written in Latin in the story but I can't figure ...
6
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1answer
45 views

How would I write “Hermit Farm” in Latin

My wife and I have built a forever home on 25 acres just outside a small country town (population approximately 8000) in Australia. We have joked over the years that we are doing this because we are ...
6
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1answer
55 views

Use of subjunctinve in a North & Hillard translation exercise

North & Hillard Ex. 228 includes: Next day Caesar had again an army which, though diminished, was prepared to face all dangers manfully. A footnote states: "Of the concessive conjunctions ...
4
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2answers
71 views

How would we translate “elephants are people”?

I have almost zero knowledge of Latin, but have had a crack at it using Google Translate, trying a few similar phrases, and going backwards and forwards between Latin and English to see if I can ...
4
votes
1answer
421 views

Translation into Latin: “for the love of music”

I am looking for a name for my newly-formed classical music studio, and I thought a Latin translation or equivalent of "for the love of music" may sound elegant. Would someone be willing to translate ...
5
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1answer
82 views

How to translate “against yourself”?

Is the following translation of "against yourself" correct? contra te ipsum I'd like to use the phrase "against yourself" in the following context: "to fight against yourself", "it's you against ...
7
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2answers
90 views

Translating “We are her sword” into Latin

I'm trying to translate a sentence "We are her sword". It's supposed to be a motto for a warriors' guild under leadership of a female elf warrior in our tabletop RPG game. Other than the obvious ...
3
votes
1answer
728 views

How to say protect & conquer in Latin

I am getting a tattoo of my two boys names - Vincent and Alexander. To make it interesting I am going with the meaning of the names in Latin rather than the names themselves. So I understand Vincent ...
6
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1answer
52 views

To aid love lost and gained

I am seeking a translation of a Christopher Wren inspired memento mori: If you seek my monument do not look around, (rather) Look you here upon her beautiful face, deep into her eyes. My school ...
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3answers
2k views

How does one say “the will to live” in Latin?

Obviously, I don't trust Google translate, or I wouldn't be here. Just to clarify: By "The will", I mean "a deliberate or fixed desire or intention".
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3answers
222 views

Translating “dangerous together” for a ring

I would like to have the phrase "NN and NN — dangerous together" inscribed in a ring in Latin. Google Translate suggests periculosum simul and simul ancipitia, but I'm not sure if they make any ...
10
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3answers
504 views

Latin translation for “Remember calmness”

I have anger management issues, and am currently working on a tattoo I'd like to have done. So I'm thinking of a good Latin phrase which carries the same spirit as Memento Mori. What I'd like to have ...