Questions tagged [word-request]

For questions regarding specific words for a specific purpose.

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6
votes
2answers
82 views

How to say that a mathematical curve contains a point?

What would be the suitable Latin verb to express the idea that a curve (e.g. a circle, a parabola) contains/includes a point? My first thought was parabola punctum continet but it seems that ...
5
votes
1answer
75 views

"To hold a grudge" in Latin?

How does one say "to hold a grudge against someone" in Latin? A grudge is "a feeling of deep-seated resentment or ill will".
8
votes
4answers
2k views

Is there an English word derived from τάσσω, with a similar meaning of arranging/organising?

Apologies if this is the wrong site to ask this on. I am looking for an English word that is derived from Ancient Greek τάσσω, meaning I arrange, I draw up, or I order. I would like a word that evokes ...
10
votes
1answer
135 views

Latin for "ground meat"

Trying to translate a cooking recipe into Latin, I stumbled upon the ingredient “ground meat” and wondered how to best render this in Latin. Since ground meat is not actually, well, ground (molita, ...
3
votes
1answer
198 views

Word request: floor plan / map / directory / source of information

I am developing a software product. Very briefly, given a floor plan, it lets the user edit it, and add information to each "room". Think of a shopping mall, where it will display the floor ...
3
votes
2answers
133 views

What is a word for "conception of truth"?

Is there a Latin word for "conception of truth" or "notion of truth" or a hybrid Graeco-Latin word for it? If not can such a word be termed or constructed for it? Or a phrase? How ...
6
votes
1answer
692 views

How to say "to woo" in Latin?

How does one say "to woo" or "to court" (i.e., to solicit someone for marriage) in Latin?
3
votes
2answers
201 views

How to say "stalker" ("prowler") in Latin?

How does one say "stalker" in Latin? In the sense of, as the OED puts it, "one who follows or harasses someone (often a public figure) with whom he or she has become obsessed."
5
votes
1answer
130 views

What is the Latin word for “polymath”?

I wonder what Latin word or expression best describes a polymath, someone who masters several subjects. The two solutions I thought of are the following but I find them unsatisfactory. polymathēs, -...
9
votes
1answer
1k views

How to say "black market" in Latin?

How does one say "black market" in Latin? According to the OED, this word first originated in English in 1727.
5
votes
4answers
515 views

How to say "in a certain respect" in Latin?

How does one say the adverbial phrase "in a certain respect" or "in certain respects" in Latin? For example, would whatever under a certain condition is such-and-such, is such-and-...
11
votes
1answer
951 views

Did the ancients or medievals have a word for the energy stored in plants?

If you spend a little time gardening, you soon become aware that plants store energy in their roots, which they collect from the Sun through their leaves. By the end of Autumn, perennials usually have ...
5
votes
1answer
77 views

How to talk about a mailing list in latin?

We have (wiki with sources) new latin words for the email service (cursus electronicus or cursus publicus electronicus), a single email (litterae electronicae or electrogramma, -tis n) and email ...
5
votes
3answers
674 views

Is there a word for "science/study of art"?

Is there a word for "science/study of art"? For the moment I use the neologism "artologia" but I'd rather conform to the usage. Edit. I would prefer a single word translation. Edit....
7
votes
2answers
107 views

Is there a word or short phrase that corresponds to "dunk" in English?

It seems like "demergo" and "immergo" may have some close linguistic domains to the English word 'dunk' but I'm not sure. Is there a Latin word which would work equally well for ...
10
votes
2answers
1k views

Does Latin have any words for specific numbers apart from the numbers themselves (akin to the English "dozen", for example)

In English, many numbers have specific words that denote them, distinct from the number itself. For example "dozen" means group of 12; "gross" means 144; and "score" ...
5
votes
0answers
85 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
1
vote
3answers
197 views

What would "kiwi" be in Latin? [closed]

What would kiwi be in Latin? Both the bird and the fruit. I guess there's no actual word because I don't think they had kiwis, but what would you guess it to be if you had to use it?
3
votes
1answer
96 views

I’m exploring names for a fictional space agency. Which would be more correct?

I’d like it to have the acronym "ET" Would it be better for it to be: excelsior terra or excelsior tellus I’m sure that there are better ways to express this though I have always liked the ...
5
votes
2answers
507 views

What is a word that means “see” (refer to), but in latin form, like “r.e.”?

What is a word that means “see” (refer to) (go see), but in latin form, like “r.e.”? I asked this in the English stackexchange and got kicked out
10
votes
1answer
887 views

How to translate "what" when used as an ironic interjection

Is there any good way to translate "what" when used as an ironic interjection, e.g. "What? He thought that would be a good idea?" said in a sarcastic tone? My first thought is just to use quis or quid ...
9
votes
3answers
938 views

What is a leap year in Latin?

Now that it's 29th of February, there is no way not to ask: What is a leap year in Latin? Leap month and leap day (mensis/dies intercalaris or intercalarius) are well attested. In the Julian calendar ...
2
votes
2answers
609 views

"Contra felicem vix deus vires habet" - Need advice on replacing the word "Felicem"

For context, this is for a tattoo I'd like to get but I want to make sure it's syntactically correct as best as possible. I think the phrase is a great one, however I would very much prefer it to be ...
5
votes
1answer
202 views

What is "heart" as the emotional organ?

In English one uses the word "heart" in a variety of ways to express deep emotion, as in "She will always be in our hearts". Is there a corresponding "emotional organ" in Latin? How should I go about ...
4
votes
2answers
998 views

How do you say "translation" in Koine Greek?

I'm looking for a Koine Greek word that means "translation". When I say "translation", I'm referring to a translation of a text in a foreign language. So the context would be the translation of a ...
5
votes
2answers
677 views

What should we call the space beyond the world?

To the Romans, if I understand right, the word caelum "sky" incorporated everything above the earth: the atmosphere, the space beyond it, and even the thrones of the gods. But nowadays we divide ...
7
votes
2answers
362 views

How were fractions written and pronounced?

In English, when we want to express parts of wholes and certain numbers of said parts, we use fractions consisting of a denominator indicating how many equal pieces an item has been broken or divided ...
7
votes
6answers
2k views

How to say 'striped' in Latin

I'm looking for a way to describe striped cloth — that is, with regular stripes all over, or like the stripes on the flag of the USA. I'm well aware of the stripe on a toga, angusticlavus, etc. But ...
6
votes
2answers
923 views

What is a romance in Latin?

The word "romance" seems to come from Latin, but no similar Latin word appears to mean anything related. Is there a good Latin word for a romance, a kind of an intimate relationship? I cannot think of ...
6
votes
0answers
77 views

Latin name of "Roman Dodecahedron"?

There are some 200 archaeological finds known under the name "Roman dodecahedron". There is no accepted or convincing explanation about their purpose and they have not been identified in any text. ...
2
votes
2answers
191 views

Did the word "citione" meaning "bump in the head" exist in Latin?

In the Spanish language site someone asked about the etymology of the word chichón (link in Spanish), meaning bump (typically in the head as a result of a hit). The most common theory is that it is ...
1
vote
1answer
54 views

Natural or unflavoured products

There are a number of different flavours of, say, yogurts, and one of them is plain, without any added flavours besides what is needed to make the yogurt. In English this flavour seems to be often ...
7
votes
1answer
428 views

What to call a Christmas present in Latin?

What would be a good way to call Christmas presents on contemporary Latin? Are there attested Latin descriptions of early Christmas where presents are given, or should we perhaps choose something ...
6
votes
2answers
494 views

What is a forum in Latin?

The word "forum" as used in English and many other modern languages obviously comes from Latin. It means a place where people gather to discuss, like an online forum or a scientific conference, but ...
8
votes
4answers
3k views

What is a boyfriend or a girlfriend in Latin?

When answering this question, it occurred to me that I don't know what to call a "boyfriend" or a "girlfriend" in Latin. What would be good words? I assume that the same solution will work for both ...
2
votes
1answer
68 views

Inlustrus: A conundrum

I stumbled upon this exchange so I hope you can help me. I'm writing a book of poetry, and I wanted to title it Starlight, but why use English, am I right? So I made the rookie error with Google ...
1
vote
2answers
315 views

Is there a verb for people of the same sex marrying in latin?

As far as I know there are two words in Latin that indicate two people marrying nubere This means to veil oneself for marriage. It thus has to be said by a female member and it is implied that this ...
9
votes
3answers
213 views

Did the Romans 'tip' for good service?

I need to refer in Latin to the modern practice of 'tipping' in return for good service. I am well aware of words and phrases for 'reward', which are essentially correct for my purpose, but I should ...
3
votes
1answer
46 views

What is the difference between "return" and "yield"?

In the Python programming language, "yield" and "return" are keywords with specific meanings. A function can either yield a result (sending that result back and then continuing to work), or return it ...
1
vote
1answer
84 views

What is "transcendence"?

Suppose I wish to talk about transcendence: the state of surpassing normal limits, particularly limits of the human mind and body. The obvious answer is something like transcendentia, from trans + ...
7
votes
1answer
2k views

What is a "monster" in Latin?

English "monster" comes from Latin monstrum "divine omen, supernatural occurrence", from moneō "warn". Later this shifted to the meaning it has in English, a horrifying or evil creature. But before ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

What is "terror" in Latin?

If I have understood correctly, the English word "terror" roughly means various activities invoking fear, such as attacks on civilians, and "terrorism" is the use of terror for political purposes. The ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

A word for protector of nature/animals

I am looking for a Latin word that describes a person who: protects (is a guardian) is kind to takes responsibility of is kind of a deity for animals or for nature. Is there a certain word for that?
5
votes
1answer
111 views

Idiomatic phrasing of "to the [cardinal direction] of [something]"

I am currently writing a small geography of the Roman Empire at its greatest extent (in the year 117 AD, under Emperor Trajan) in an effort to practice my composition skills. So far everything has ...
8
votes
2answers
194 views

What is a good deed?

Suppose I wanted to talk about good deeds. Generally this means acts done by someone for selfless reasons, solely to benefit others. For a literal translation I could go with bona facta, but the ...
7
votes
2answers
260 views

Are there well-assimilated Latin words from Semitic languages?

I've generally assumed that Latin words coming from Semitic are usually transformed by Greek: even Elissa is a Greek transcription of the original. But this answer indicates that the well-attested ...
4
votes
1answer
381 views

Is there an Ancient Greek verb with this very particular (and nsfw) meaning?

I heard it claimed recently that Ancient Greek had a verb similar to irrumāre, but specifically for irrumātiō performed on a corpse. This seems somewhat absurd, and the claim had no source attached, ...
9
votes
5answers
3k views

What would "high school" be in Latin?

There was a conversation between Joonas Ilmavirta and I in CONLOQVIVM, during which we attempted to figure out what the appropriate translation for the phrase "high school" (specifically of the ...
3
votes
3answers
143 views

What is "mechanical"?

If I wanted to describe something as "mechanical", as opposed to electronic or human-run, how would I do this in Classical Latin? As the Romans had no electronics, the main distinction I'm interested ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

What is "legendary" in Latin?

The English word "legendary" obviously comes from Latin, from the gerundive legendus, "that which is to be read". (Less clumsy wording ideas are welcome!) I might base a translation of the noun "...