Questions tagged [word-request]

For questions regarding specific words for a specific purpose.

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What is the Latin word for "manifesto"?

If I wanted to speak of the Communist Manifesto or the Humanist Manifesto in Latin, what word should I use? Perhaps "praeconium communisticum", as Wikipedia suggests? If I understand ...
Victor's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
906 views

How do you say "on" as in "The book is on the table."?

So, how do you say "on" in Latin, as in "The book is on the table.". Would you say "Liber super mensa est."? I have a feeling that would imply that the book is hovering ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
144 views

How to say "bribe" in Latin?

How does one say "bribe" (noun or verb) in Latin? In Italian, it is tangente, from the Latin tangentem ("touched"). The Lexicon Recentis Latinitatis says tangente (🇮🇹) means ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,628
4 votes
0 answers
101 views

How would you say "pet" (animal kept for companion, such as a cat, a dog, or a rabbit) in Latin?

Ancient Romans kept dogs and cats as pets, right? Was there a word used to refer to animals which are kept in such a way? If so, which one?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

“Flow of knowledge”

I recently created a company called Scientiflux. It should suggest something like “Flow of knowledge”, but what would be the grammatically correct way to express this in Latin?
Stefan's user avatar
  • 103
8 votes
1 answer
1k views

How would you say "body" as in when stating a law of physics?

When writing a Reddit post in Latin, I used the word "corpus" in the singular when stating the second law of thermodynamics: Secunda lex thermodynamicae docet nobis quia nullum corpus ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
248 views

How do you say "What do you mean?" in Latin?

I know "to mean" is usually translated as "significare", however, I feel like that in the question "What do you mean?" it means something completely different. In ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
115 views

Prequel, or the story before?

There was a writing term posted in a class I had taken 10 years ago, and it essentially meant prequel or “the story before” and for the life of me I cannot remember it nor find any sort of phrase that ...
DeeDee's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
293 views

How to say 'I miss you' in Latin

How can I say "I miss you" in the sense that one misses someone and desires to be again with this someone nonetheless it is alive or death? My dicctionary only list: miror, which is more ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
242 views

Reimagining the logical gates in Latin

Boolean logic has logical gates which have the following truth tables: NON gate: Input Output 0 1 1 0 AND gate: Input A Input B Output 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 NAND gate: Input A Input B ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
848 views

Would "motor oil" (such as in a car engine) be "oleum" or "unguentum" or something else?

I am interested, how would you say "motor oil" (the one that you put in your car engine) in Latin? Would it be "oleum" or "unguentum" or maybe something else?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

How would you ask "Which courses do you have this semester?" in Latin? Specifically, which word would you use for "course"?

The English word "course" comes from Latin "cursus". But the Croatian word for "course at a university" is "kolegij", which comes from Latin "collegium&...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
383 views

How would you say "to see things from up above" in Latin?

There is a song by Tedi Spalato, dedicated to Vinko Coce who had recently died, called "Vidi li se šta odozgar?", which means "Can anything be seen from up above (from heaven)?". ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
2k views

Saying "Goodbye!" to a deceased person

To say "Goodbye!" to a deceased person on their funeral, would you also use "Vale!"? Wouldn't that be oxymoronic, since "Vale!" means "Be healthy!"? So, how ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
7 votes
0 answers
117 views

An adjective for Seneca

A particular passage in Cicero's works is a locus Ciceronianus, a work written in the style of Vergil is an opus Vergilianum etc. But which adjective should I use for Seneca? There exists apparently ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
97 views

What are the antonyms of ob and prae?

I learned that the antonym of ante is post, both of which were born dual to each other. If I understand correctly, ob and prae mean the same or related to ante. What are their antonyms? post isn't ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 921
4 votes
1 answer
81 views

How do I say "semantician/semanticist" in Latin?

I recently came across the intriguing terms, 'semantician' and 'semanticist', both referring to a specialist in semantics. These words are derived from the Ancient Greek root 'sēmantikós'. My query is ...
semantician's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

How would you say "A butterfly is landing on a flower." in Latin?

How would you say "A butterfly is landing on a flower." in Latin? Specifically, which word would you use for "to land"? In a song called "Aeromiting u vrtu", sung by ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
84 views

Alternatives to "Hac abierit"

In Seneca's Epistulae morales ad Lucilium (Letter 3): Itaque si proprio illo verbo quasi publico usus es et sic illum amicum vocasti quomodo omnes candidatos 'bonos viros' dicimus, quomodo obvios, si ...
d_e's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
142 views

What is the best Latin translation of 'towards truth'?

I am looking to create a Substack publication where I can share articles I have written on philosophy. I want to choose a name for the website that best summarises or encapsulates the nature of the ...
Joseph's user avatar
  • 31
4 votes
2 answers
388 views

How would you say "denier" in Latin?

An example of deniers are The Mad Revisionists. They are conspiracy theorists who think the Moon doesn't exist. In other words, they are Moon deniers. How would you say "Moon denier" in ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
127 views

How do you say "graveside" and "gravestone" in Latin?

I am trying to translate the lyrics of the Eric Bogle's song The Green Fields of France to Latin. The first two verses are: Well, how do you do, young William McBride? Do you mind if I sit here by ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
72 views

How do you say "monument" (as opposed to "grave") in Latin?

When I asked this question, I learned that the Latin word "monumentum" did not mean "monument", but "grave". So, how would you say "monument" in Latin? For ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
355 views

Is there any Neo-Latin word for the concepts of "hacking" and "hacker"?

MY CONCLUSION: From the options I have seen so far, the options that seem to me best were, for a generic description of hacking, to say that it is in computatorium irrumpere, with a hacker being a ...
Victor BC's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
141 views

Latin verbs describing bodily sensing vs. intellectual sensing

For each of the 5 senses, does Latin have distinct verbs for the intellectual act that follows from the bodily act of sensation? For example: Bodily act of sensing Corresponding act of intellect to ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,628
18 votes
3 answers
4k views

Is there a Latin equivalent for this particular nsfw term?

Thanks to Martial, I've come across a decent variety of sexual terms in Latin. Unfortunately, these words are generally difficult to look up in dictionaries, because of the archaic style Latin ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66k
5 votes
1 answer
468 views

What is the Latin word for "diagram"?

In my question about how to say "root locus" in Latin, my attempt was "diagramma locorum radicum". However, I am not sure that the best Latin word for "diagram" or "...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
254 views

Latin term for 'dramaturge' using the root 'δρᾶμα'

What is the equivalent of the term "dramaturge" in (Classical) Latin using the root "δρᾶμα"? Is "scriptor dramaticus" an appropriate option? Smith & Hall provides &...
user avatar
6 votes
0 answers
85 views

How do I say "typeface" in Latin?

How do I say "typeface" (that is "font family") in Latin? The Wikipedia page is translated under the title "Typus" but there is a banner saying "Latinitas huius rei ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
74 views

What is the Latin word for 'reading sheet'?

I am looking for a Latin word or phrase that can express the concept of a ‘reading sheet’, which is a document that summarizes the main information of a book or a text. Is there such a word or phrase ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
90 views

How were ancient books divided?

Nowadays, books are divided into chapters, chapters into sections, sections into subsections, and so on. Is there an equivalent hierarchy in Latin (I'm mainly asking about classical Latin, but maybe ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
51 views

Is there an umbrella term in Latin for stage plays and dialogues?

What would be the idiomatic way to refer to dialogues and stage plays together in Latin? That is literary forms where the main speech is direct
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
107 views

"Language model" in Latin

Some of the most popular generative AI tools are large language models (BERT, GPT3, etc.) I was wondering how this concept could be expressed in Latin. A language model is a type of artificial ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
2k views

How do you say "medicine" in Latin without borrowing a Greek word?

Is there a "purely Latin" way of saying "medicine"? The Smith & Hall and Goelzer dictionaries both give "medicina" as the only translation. Is there a paraphrase like ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
126 views

"axiology" in Latin

Axiology (from Greek ἀξία, axia: "value, worth"; and -λογία, -logia: "study of") is the philosophical study of value. It is a branch of philosophy that includes politics (Scientia ...
user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
1k views

How can I translate the names of the Proto-Indo-European gods and goddesses into Latin?

What would be the best Latin translation of the following two main Proto-Indo-European gods? *Dyḗws Ph₂tḗr (sky father) *Dʰéǵʰōm Méh₂tēr (earth mother) I would like to use words directly derived ...
SkyFather's user avatar
  • 113
14 votes
2 answers
3k views

Is there a word for ephemeral but meaning lasting one night?

Looking for a word like "ephemeral," which is derived from Latin "ephēmeros," meaning "lasting only a day," according to the Oxford Dictionary of English. However, I'd ...
lemonlemon's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
216 views

On a Quote from St. Gregory and the Contextual Meaning of the Word `Operator'

Contained in St. Alphonsus Liguori's Dignity and Duties of the Priest or Selva, one finds the following passage in the section on "Sanctity Necessary for the Priest": But St. Bernard says, ...
DDS's user avatar
  • 43
7 votes
1 answer
443 views

Latin for "kitty"

Reading "Salve feles" recently, and thinking that this actually meant "Hello cat" -- and not, as I assumed it was intended to, "Hello kitty" -- I began wondering how we ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
113 views

What is the term for a time period less than a month?

I am working on a project that includes things that recurs at various time periods, but they are all less than a month, so some can be weekly, fortnightly or daily. I want an umbrella term for these ...
khateeb's user avatar
  • 109
4 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is the Latin word for a crossword puzzle?

Crucigramma and cruciverbium are both used by Vicipaedia but I find them unsatisfactory: crucigramma is a mix between a Latin and a Greek root (AFAIK), cruciverbium almost looks like a misspelling of ...
user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
2k views

How do you describe someone as a shapeshifter in Latin?

Greco-Roman mythology is full of many examples of shape-changing. If you look only at Zeus/Jupiter alone, there are countless examples of him changing himself or changing others. Did the Romans have a ...
Adam's user avatar
  • 8,470
5 votes
1 answer
76 views

How to say "in solid rock" in Latin to convey specific technical meaning?

I am writing a paper that describes nuclear reactions that take place in the earth's crust leading to the formation of volatile gases. In several places, I need to distinguish between things that ...
thegreatemu's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
135 views

What would be the name for government for, from, and by

The people Shareholders The king Investors Customers Tax payers Plus explanation. From sources, I've heard that those are Democracy Metochocracy Monarchy Ependocracy Pelatarchy What? I may be wrong....
user4951's user avatar
  • 137
6 votes
2 answers
2k views

Is there a Latin word for 225th anniversary?

If bicentennial is the Latin word for the 200th anniversary, what word would one use for the 225th anniversary?
Michael Barnett's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
181 views

“Aquathlon” in Classical Latin

An aquathlon is a multisport race consisting of continuous run and swim elements. Competitors complete a swim immediately followed by a run over various distances. How would this race be named in ...
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
611 views

How to translate the adjective ‘pacifist’ into Latin?

How do you translate the adjective ‘pacifist’ into Latin? ‘pacifistus, a, um’ seems incorrect to me since all the words I’ve found with the suffix -ista are nouns, not adjectives. alchemist: *...
user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
807 views

Were there ever gerunds for posse and esse?

As Figulus stated in a recent answer: But passive infinitives are not the only infinitives which lack a gerund. Posse and esse also lack a gerund, and that brings to my mind the neo-Latin expression, ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 66k
6 votes
1 answer
358 views

How would you translate "The Adorned" for use as a collective title?

I took a few years of Latin back in high school, but my understanding of the language never really surpassed novice levels. I've been brainstorming names for a wolf pack in a story of mine; a lot of ...
Coyoteskip's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
48 views

Are there different words for an excerpt and its location in Latin?

In Latin, locus can be the passage of a text (e.g. Cicero says he is going to translate a passage in one of his speeches and uses locus if I remember correctly) but it can also be the location of the ...
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