Unanswered Questions

308 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
12
votes
1answer
325 views

Received pronunciation in Ancient Greek

As S. Teodorsson argues in his work on the phonemic system of the Attic dialect, there is evidence that already in the IV century BC, 'popular' Athenian speech underwent changes such as the merger of ...
11
votes
0answers
113 views

Why is "porticus, porticūs" a feminine fourth-declension noun?

The fourth declension was one of the less common inflection pattern for Latin nouns, and the vast majority of fourth declension nouns are masculine nouns ending in the deverbal abstract noun suffix -...
10
votes
1answer
339 views

The opposing meanings of the word donec?

I saw that "donec" might mean: "as long as", but it also can mean "till". In a sense those are opposing meanings. let's consider this example: I'm happy as long as there is daylight outside I'm ...
9
votes
0answers
76 views

Which verbs come from *deh₃ and which from *dʰeh₁?

Latin has quite a few prefixed verbs looking like -dō, -dere, -didī, -ditus (condō, abdō, reddō, trādō, ēdō, etc). I'd previously thought these came from the verb dō, dare, dedī, datus (< *deh₃ &...
9
votes
0answers
84 views

Coordinating positive and negative imperatives

For positive commands, Latin uses the imperative: Da mihi librum "Give me the book." For negative commands, it uses a number of constructions of which noli + inf. is most common: Noli mihi ...
9
votes
0answers
97 views

Construction with ecce

According to the usual authorities the particle ecce is construed with the accusative in pre-classical Latin, but with the nominative in classical and post-classical Latin. Thus, Lewis and Short: “(...
9
votes
0answers
201 views

edere panem vs. comedere panem

Consider the following minimal pair: edere panem 'to eat (the) bread' comedere panem 'to eat up the bread' When a resultative prefix is present (e.g. com- in comedere), panem is necessarily understood ...
8
votes
0answers
225 views

Why is the infinitive used instead of a genitive gerund (e.g. "consilium ceperunt ex oppido profugere")?

I was wondering about the grammatical reason(s) whereby a(n expected) genitive gerund/gerundive is sometimes replaced by an infinitive. Here are some representative examples of this phenomenon: ...
8
votes
0answers
46 views

How can I use Perseus for Boolean searches?

Encouraged by Joonas Ilmavirta in chat, as ‘Corpus tool questions are a useful thing to have for reference’, I boldly go forth asking this publicly: Does anyone know how to do a Boolean search on ...
8
votes
0answers
125 views

Just how out of date are the major 19th/early 20th century Latin grammars (G&L, A&G, Bennett)

In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, there were a slew of Latin grammars published in English that stuck around are still popular today (in the Anglophone world). A survey of various resources ...
8
votes
0answers
175 views

Is "oppido" (adverb) related to "oppidum"(noun)?

According to L&S, the etymology of oppido (adverb) is adv. etym. dub. where I imagine "dub" stands for something like "dubious". In any case, what can we speculate about the etymology of this ...
8
votes
0answers
71 views

What is the most helpful dictionary for post-medieval works of philosophy and mathematics?

I need Latin for my natural-language artificial intelligence research, and I've been at it for enough years that I can read Latin well, but need extensive practice with composition. Thus I have ...
7
votes
0answers
58 views

Roman wedding congratulations

How did the Romans congratulate a couple on their wedding day? The concepts of wedding and marriage were not quite what they are now back then, but I assume that celebrations and congratulations were ...
7
votes
0answers
79 views

Accusativus cum Praedicativo

I've been reading The Early Latin Verb by Wolfgang David Cirilo de Melo, where in a footnote he writes: Synchronically, the participle here is best analysed as an elliptical perfect passive ...
7
votes
0answers
568 views

Is "Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end" correctly attributed to Seneca (the younger)?

The quote is a fairly well know lyric in the 1998 song Closing Time by Semisonic. In the Wikipedia entry for the song, it claims "The song ends with a quote attributed to Roman Stoic philosopher ...

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