Unanswered Questions

282 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
11
votes
1answer
311 views

Received pronunciation in Ancient Greek

As S. Teodorsson argues in his work on the phonemic system of the Attic dialect, there is evidence that already in the IV century BC, 'popular' Athenian speech underwent changes such as the merger of ...
10
votes
0answers
91 views

Why is “porticus, porticΕ«s” a feminine fourth-declension noun?

The fourth declension was one of the less common inflection pattern for Latin nouns, and the vast majority of fourth declension nouns are masculine nouns ending in the deverbal abstract noun suffix -...
10
votes
1answer
327 views

The opposing meanings of the word donec?

I saw that "donec" might mean: "as long as", but it also can mean "till". In a sense those are opposing meanings. let's consider this example: I'm happy as long as there is daylight outside I'm ...
9
votes
0answers
81 views

Construction with ecce

According to the usual authorities the particle ecce is construed with the accusative in pre-classical Latin, but with the nominative in classical and post-classical Latin. Thus, Lewis and Short: β€œ(...
9
votes
0answers
185 views

edere panem vs. comedere panem

Consider the following minimal pair: edere panem 'to eat (the) bread' comedere panem 'to eat up the bread' When a resultative prefix is present (e.g. com- in comedere), panem is necessarily understood ...
8
votes
0answers
225 views

How would you say “The Etruscan language died two thousand years ago and nobody understands it.” in Etruscan?

What do you think, is "πŒ“πŒ€πŒ”πŒ„πŒπŒ€πŒ‹βΈ±πŒ–πŒ“πŒ”πŒ‘πŒ‰πŒπŒ‰βΈ±πŒ‹πŒ–πŒπŒ–πŒ‚πŒ„βΈ±πŒ‡πŒ€πŒπŒ•πŒ‰βΈ±πŒ†πŒ€πŒˆπŒ“πŒ–πŒŒβΈ±πŒ…πŒπŒ›βΈ±πŒ€πŒ…πŒ‰πŒ‹πŒ€πŒ“πŒ‰βΈ±πŒπŒ€πŒπŒ€πŒ•πŒπŒ€πŒ‘βΈ±πŒ‰πŒπŒ‚βΈ±πŒ‡πŒ€πŒŒπŒˆπŒ‰πŒ." (transliterated: "Rasenal ursmini ...
8
votes
0answers
166 views

Is “oppido” (adverb) related to “oppidum”(noun)?

According to L&S, the etymology of oppido (adverb) is adv. etym. dub. where I imagine "dub" stands for something like "dubious". In any case, what can we speculate about the etymology of this ...
8
votes
0answers
68 views

What is the most helpful dictionary for post-medieval works of philosophy and mathematics?

I need Latin for my natural-language artificial intelligence research, and I've been at it for enough years that I can read Latin well, but need extensive practice with composition. Thus I have ...
7
votes
0answers
55 views

Accusativus cum Praedicativo

I've been reading The Early Latin Verb by Wolfgang David Cirilo de Melo, where in a footnote he writes: Synchronically, the participle here is best analysed as an elliptical perfect passive ...
7
votes
0answers
406 views

Is “Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end” correctly attributed to Seneca (the younger)?

The quote is a fairly well know lyric in the 1998 song Closing Time by Semisonic. In the Wikipedia entry for the song, it claims "The song ends with a quote attributed to Roman Stoic philosopher ...
7
votes
0answers
80 views

Is there a pre-Christian Roman story of “coming to faith”?

Is there a story in the Roman literature of someone previously not believing in the traditional Roman gods or a specific deity within their pantheon but later, after a vision or another experience, ...
7
votes
0answers
250 views

How do you call your aunt's or uncle's spouse?

In Latin, a paternal aunt is an 'amita', a paternal uncle is a 'patruus', a maternal aunt is a 'matertera' and a maternal uncle is an 'avunculus'. However, how do you call each of these people's ...
7
votes
0answers
187 views

Greek: unattainable wishes about the present

This is a question about how a specific type of unattainable (counterfactual) wish about the present is expressed in Greek. I'm looking for a good way of translating sentences like the following into ...
7
votes
0answers
110 views

When did acronyms first appear?

Acronyms are abbreviations that are read as whole words rather than letter by letter — or in other words, they are words formed from initials of a phrase. "NATO" and "laser" are two examples. I ...
7
votes
0answers
208 views

“Purissimum penem” in Suetonius's Life of Horace

Suetonius, in his Vita Horati, reports that the emperor Augustus jokingly referred to Horace as a purissimus penis: Praeterea saepe eum inter alios iocos purissimum penem et homuncionem ...

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