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Unanswered Questions

13
votes
0answers
386 views

Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes

The famous phrase "Dust to Dust, Ashes to Ashes" does not come from the Bible but from the English Burial Service of the 1662 Book of Common Prayer, reading: "we therefore commit his body to the ...
12
votes
0answers
139 views

What is the proper parsing of “macte virtute”?

As indicated in another answer, macte virtute is a common way of saying, "Well done." The consensus seems to be that macte is the vocative of mactus. L&S states (contradictorily?): (only in ...
10
votes
0answers
62 views

Third conjugation passive infinitive: why -i and not -eri?

The active infinitive is uniform (-re from -se by rhotacism) across the regular Latin conjugations, but the passive one is not: the third conjugation loses the consonant. We have amare/amari, habere/...
10
votes
0answers
96 views

Where did the Romans think Latin comes from?

Did the Romans have a theory for the origin of their language? I assume there were several ideas, and it would be great to see a summary of them. No need to go very deep on any individual theory; a ...
10
votes
0answers
78 views

Confusion re the naming of Roman freedman

I asked this on the HistorySE site, without much luck, so thought I'd try here. If it's inappropriate for this forum, please let me know and I'll delete it. I have just been reading this which is ...
10
votes
0answers
220 views

What are New Latin's comma rules?

What are New Latin's comma rules? Specifically, where do New Latin's comma rules differ from modern English's comma rules (e.g., as documented in the 16th ed. of the Chicago Manual of Style §§6.15-6....
10
votes
1answer
162 views

What is the difference between accusative and genitive with meminisse?

The verb meminisse can take an accusative or a genitive object. Also other constructions are possible (see the entry in L&S), but I want to focus on comparing these two in classical Latin. Are ...
8
votes
0answers
96 views

Etymology and pronunciation of words ending in “-iasis”

Unfortunately, I don’t own any Latin or Greek dictionaries or etymological texts, but I tried to research this topic on the internet. Here is what I found: Perseus: words ending in “iasis” in L&S ...
8
votes
0answers
43 views

Where can I find standard translations of mathematics/physics terms in Latin?

Suppose I want to write a math paper in Latin. I need to translate terms such as "manifold", "holomorphic", "martingale", etc. The Latin Wikipedia only has a limited number of terms available and ...
8
votes
0answers
489 views

Contracted perfect and historical infinitive

The present infinitive is sometimes used as a predicate in a past tense sentence. The use context is similar to praesens historicum. My grammar gives two examples: Nihil Galli respondere, sed in ...
7
votes
0answers
45 views

Where did the passive infinitive come from?

The etymology of the present active infinitive seems well-documented. Proto-Italic had an infinitive-like suffix *-si, so *dōnā- + *-si = *dōnāsi > dōnāre by regular sound changes (s → z → r between ...
7
votes
0answers
49 views

When was a pair of Greek and Roman gods first identified?

There is a canonical correspondence between some Greek and Roman gods and goddesses, for example Ares and Mars. However, these two were originally different deities: Ares represented rage in war and ...
7
votes
0answers
95 views

When did equus regain its first U?

I learned from this question about sequundus > secundus that -quus was in fact pronounced as if it was -cus. However, words like equus were not spelled as ecus, since most oblique cases would still ...
7
votes
0answers
76 views

Is it possible to have a single Latin ligature be majuscule and minuscule?

Context The Latin grapheme: "Œ" is the majuscule ligature of the letters "O" and "E". Is it proper—or in-fact possible—to have part of the ligature be majuscule and the other part be minuscule?
7
votes
0answers
108 views

Which mora of a stressed long vowel or diphthong bears the emphasis?

When a stress falls on a long vowel or a diphthong as in, for example: dīcō (IPA /ˈdiː.koː/) coepiō (IPA: /ˈkoe̯.pi.oː/) should I think that the emphasis: falls on the first mora, falls on the ...

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