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Questions tagged [christianity]

Use this tag for all questions related to Christianity. Consider also using more specific tags like "vulgata" or "ecclesiastical-latin".

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791 views

Meaning of “SEVERA INDEOVI VAS” from 3rd Century slab

Can someone explain the meaning of the words "SEVERA INDEOVI VAS" on this slab: According to https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Depiction_of_Jesus, the above image is of an "Incised sarcophagus slab with ...
5
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0answers
28 views

Exact meaning of aurora in canon law?

Aurora means dawn, that's well known. But there is more than one type of dawn. The English Wikipedia knows three types: astronomical (18°), nautical (12°) and civil dawn (sun 6° below the horizon). ...
4
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2answers
71 views

Why the placement of the verse break between John 7:21-22?

I've been slowly working my way through the Gospel of John translating from the Greek. Coming to John 7:21-22, I am a bit stumped as to why editors have placed sentence and verse breaks where they ...
3
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1answer
59 views

Translation of the Word Συντέλεια

The ancient text of Matthew 24:3 reads: “Καθημένου δὲ αὐτοῦ ἐπὶ τοῦ ὄρους τῶν ἐλαιῶν προσῆλθον αὐτῷ οἱ μαθηταὶ κατ᾽ ἰδίαν λέγοντες· εἰπὲ ἡμῖν, πότε ταῦτα ἔσται καὶ τί τὸ σημεῖον τῆς σῆς παρουσίας ...
7
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2answers
85 views

Parsing “Vale, o valde decóra” in the Ave Regina Caelorum

Ave, Regína cælórum, Ave, Dómina Angelórum: Salve radix, salve porta, Ex qua mundo lux est orta: Gaude, Virgo gloriósa, Super omnes speciósa, Vale, o valde decóra, Et pro nobis Christum ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Etymology of “immediatus”

Context There is an ongoing discussion here on the intended meaning of the word "immediately", as found in the 1950's encyclical Humani generis, by Pope Pius XII. The declaration states: human ...
5
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1answer
45 views

Do we ever see “in saeculo saeculorum”?

Recently, luchonacho asked about the phrase in saecula saeculōrum: literally, "into the lifetimes of the lifetimes". It's kind of a weird phrase, for multiple reasons. However, I'd always thought the ...
6
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2answers
99 views

On the literal meaning of “in saecula saeculorum”

Literally, this phrase (found originally in the New Testament of the Vulgata) is translated as "into [the] ages of [the] ages". It's supposed to be an expression of eternity, and it's commonly ...
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2answers
58 views

Translating “I will be called Thomas.” into Latin

In relation to the first words said by a pope when he is elected, would it be right to say that if he chose "Thomas" then the translation of the above is: "Vocabor Thomas" Or is it "Vocabor Thoma"? ...
4
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1answer
95 views

Irradians sata læta

Here are the first three lines of the 2nd of the Prophetiæ Sybillarum, that of the Sybilla Lybica, set to music by Orlandus Lassus, with an English translation from Wikipedia. I haven't sorted out ...
2
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1answer
75 views

“Ite, missa est.” Direct meaning of “Missa est” [duplicate]

In the Catholic liturgy at the dismissal, the Latin phrase used is "Ite, missa est." The usual translation for this is "Go, it is the dismissal." My question is, what is the meaning of "Missa est" ...
8
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2answers
149 views

How would I say “fallen” in a Christian sense?

Suppose I want to talk about "fallen angels": angels who (according to some Abrahamic sects) rebelled against God and were cast out of Heaven. What would be the appropriate word for this? I'm not ...
6
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4answers
180 views

What's the translation of this Medieval document?

This is a page taken from a medieval breviary from 13th century Italy Found this document at The Antiquarium in Houston. Would like to know what it is describing. Translations as well as paraphrases ...
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4answers
770 views

Saints: sanctus or divus?

I was in Bologna last week, and a couple of churches had an inscription about their dedication to a saint. To my surprise, they used the word divus instead of sanctus. For example, a church may be ...
6
votes
3answers
473 views

Elevatis oculis?

In the Sixto-Clementine Vulgate, Genesis 22:4 reads: die autem tertio, elevatis oculis, vidit locum procul The Douay-Rheims translates: And on the third day, lifting up his eyes, he saw the ...
5
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1answer
201 views

From 'Angel of God': “tibi commissum pietate superna”

The traditional Latin prayer, 'Angel of God', goes like this: Ángele Dei, qui custos es mei, me, tibi commissum pietáte supérna, hodie illúmina, custódi, rege et gubérna. Amen. English ...
8
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3answers
176 views

Few are saved, many are damned

In Barbara Tuchman's A Distant Mirror; in chapter 2, in her description of the Medieval church, she uses the phrase 'Salvandorum paucitas, damnandorum multitudo' to describe the general opinion of the ...
8
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3answers
238 views

Translation of Ps 16(15), 6 (Vulgata)

Verse in question is as follows: Funes ceciderunt mihi in praeclaris; etenim haereditas mea praeclara est mihi. It would seem to me that meaning is something like this: Funes: ropes, bonds, ...
6
votes
1answer
135 views

How “sōlā fidē” means what it is supposed to mean

The question is whether the phrase (a) denies there being more than one faith or (b) excludes there being any other means of salvation. BACKGROUND I am assuming that the phrase is intended to ...
4
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0answers
182 views

Is there a typical Easter greeting in Latin?

The typical Easter greetings are different in different languages. In some languages it's "Happy Easter" or "Good Easter", while some say "Christ has risen". Any of these phrases could be translated ...
5
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4answers
225 views

Latin name of Good Friday

Judging by Vicipaedia (I know, I know), Good Friday is known as Dies Passionis Domini in Latin. This is a very direct name. In English it is Good Friday, in Nordic countries Long Friday and other ...
6
votes
1answer
125 views

Did “paganus” mean a non-believer before Christianity?

The adjective paganus is derived from pagus and seems to originally mean roughly "belonging to a village". According to the L&S entry the sense "non-military" is also classically attested. In ...
8
votes
1answer
71 views

What was the first name of Christmas?

What was the first Latin word or expression used for Christmas, the Christian event in the honor of Jesus' birth? I know what to call Christmas in Latin, but it occurred to me that there is no ...
5
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0answers
144 views

Translation of Greek “ἅπτω” in John 20:17

English versions of John 20:17 show two types of accounts: Jesus said to her, “Do not cling to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father and Jesus says to her, "Do not touch me, for not yet ...
6
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3answers
103 views

Two possible translations of a hymn: which is most likely right?

I came across this catholic hymn, whose text can be found in various versions online, and I found the following: Jesu, rex admirabilis, Et triumphator nobilis, Dulcedo ineffabilis, Totus ...
9
votes
2answers
862 views

Understanding “conceptus est de Spiritu Sancto”

The Apostles' Creed contains this passage: qui conceptus est de Spiritu Sancto, natus ex Maria Virgine, passus sub Pontio Pilato, crucifixus, mortuus, et sepultus… I am interested in the ...
12
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2answers
173 views

What is the origin of the “veneration” meaning of dulia?

The word dulia comes from the Greek doulia (meaning "slavery" or "servitude"). But in Catholicism, the word has taken on a theological meaning, as described in the Catholic Encyclopedia, "signifying ...
10
votes
1answer
162 views

Should motum be translated as emotions?

Calvin's commentary on Romans 1:18 (Latin, English translation by MacKenzie): Ira, ἀνθρωποπαθῶς, more Scripturae pro ultione Dei: quia Deus puniens, prae se fert (nostra opinione) irascentis faciem....
6
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0answers
84 views

A stone with the incomplete inscription “IH”, how old is it?

I have this stone with the incomplete inscription "IH". I think it could be the IHS Christogram but I am not sure. The height of the fragment is about 10cm, the material seems terracotta. The stone ...
9
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2answers
608 views

What does this manuscript say?

On the Medieval Latin Wikipedia page, this image is present under Influences: Christian Latin. I can make out some of the words, but I'm not particularly good with interpreting scribes' handwriting. I ...
9
votes
1answer
326 views

“Esto mihi in rupem praesidii et in domum munitam…”

I have a question about a translation of the phrase mentioned in the title, which comes from Psalm 30 (31) as it appears in "The Office of Compline, Latin and English" from the Saint Louis Antiphonary ...
4
votes
1answer
578 views

Is my translation of “ichthys” (in Greek) correct?

Ichthys is a Greek acronym, an early symbol of Christianity. The Wikipedia entry defines it as: ΙΧΘΥΣ, or also ΙΧΘΥC with lunate sigma (Ichthys) is a backronym/acrostic[6] for "Ἰησοῦς Χριστός, Θεοῦ ...
10
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2answers
1k views

Dominus illuminatio mea

I am trying to understand this expression. According to Wikipedia, it is translated as "The Lord is my light". Before reading this article, I thought this meant "Lord illuminate me", perhaps in ...
7
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1answer
107 views

Job 5.7 in the King James version

This extract from the novel 'Three Men in a Boat' refers to Job 5.7: This world is only a probation, and man was born to trouble as the sparks fly upward. I hoped to quote the source, expecting ...
11
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3answers
2k views

Christ or Messiah in Latin

The Greek word Christos (Χριστός) and the Hebrew word Messiah (many similar words exist in related languages, and I don't claim to make an accurate transliteration of any of them) are titles used of ...
7
votes
2answers
847 views

Is this translation from Ancient Greek correct?

I'd like to ask experts in Greek to verify a translation from this mosaic from Jerash This one is a cropped and rotated version of an original image from here English translation: Lord the God ...
7
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1answer
1k views

John 3:16 In Latin

I know that there exist many Ecclesiastical Latin and Medieval translations kept by professors and most catholic churches, but I decided, just to test my vocabulary, to translate John 3:16 into ...
17
votes
3answers
313 views

The Latin word “Have” rather than “Ave” as a translation of the Greek word Χαῖρε?

According to BlueLetterBible, the Latin Vulgate translation of Matthew 26:49 states, The Greek text from the Textus Receptus states, ΜΘʹ καὶ εὐθέως προσελθὼν τῷ Ἰησοῦ εἶπεν Χαῖρε ῥαββί καὶ ...
11
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1answer
128 views

Translation: «impulsi sunt et ipsi Christi amore»

I’ve yet another question on the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC). (I did find another instance of the gerundive—I believe with a preceding ad indicating purpose—and Cerebrus’ instruction ...
11
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1answer
232 views

Understanding the grammar: «illis Evangelii nuntiandi praebens mandatum»

The following is the Latin text from the Catechism of the Catholic Church (CCC), Prologue, Chapter 1, Section 2: 2 Ut haec vocatio in toto resonaret orbe, Christus Apostolos misit, quos elegerat, ...
7
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2answers
143 views

“To be” and a commentator on Aquinas

Father David Burrell, a well-known philosopher and theologian who has written on Thomas Aquinas, has discussed Aquinas' view of God, or at least of what could or could not be properly said about God. ...
13
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1answer
102 views

Why is “repetunt” 3rd pl active in Luke 12:20 (Vulgate)?

I was reading today's gospel from the Roman calendar and noticed this in Luke 12:20: dixit autem illi Deus stulte hac nocte animam tuam repetunt a te quae autem parasti cuius erunt I was struck by ...
8
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1answer
92 views

Please briefly define “futurum instans”

I am writing a book, quoting from Aune: “There are several instances in Revelation of this use of ἔρχεται as futurum instans…” Note that Aune uses the term “futurum instans” for Greek, not ...
5
votes
2answers
111 views

Aurora Natalis or Aurora Natalicus?

I have practically no experience with Latin, but from what I understand Aurora Borealis roughly means northern dawn, and Aurora Australis roughly means southern dawn. What would be the equivalent way ...
6
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2answers
348 views

What do the words “tunc tantum” mean together?

Pope Francis tweeted on September 21st, Sermonem confero cum aliquo sincerum tunc tantum agnosco illum esse donum Dei mihique aliquid pretiosum dicturum. Here is my translation. (Credits to Keith ...
4
votes
1answer
129 views

What does the clause “quae suae salvationis causa exstitit” mean?

I'm having difficulty parsing the following sentence from Alfonsi's Dialogi contra Iudaeos, particularly the clause in bold: Dies Dominica, dies, viz. resurrectionis, quae suae salvationis causa ...
8
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1answer
209 views

Use of the gerund in the Vulgate bible

I was reading Luke 10:25 in the Vulgate bible, trying my best to translate as literally as possible. But I found it hard to translate the question that the expert of law (legisperitus) poses. (...
2
votes
1answer
120 views

Simple translation from Polish and English to Latin

I have totally no clue about Latin language, but I need translation for the title to my music project. The answer is not "Magnum Opus Dei". I would like to know what's in Latin: Polish - Wielkie ...
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0answers
231 views

Soli Deo gloria: sol or solus?

In the phrase Soli Deo gloria one can read soli in two different ways: If it is solus, the phrase means "glory only to the God" or "glory to the only God". If it is sol, the phrase means "glory to ...
7
votes
2answers
180 views

What did the Council of Braga (~560) say about singing psalms in church?

The First Council of Braga was a meeting of eight bishops that took place around AD 560. They produced a number of decrees, one of which relates to the type of songs that could be sung in church. ...