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For questions regarding the meaning or connotation of a word or phrase.

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Can we use the verb "sum" with the present participle "absens"?

I recall seeing "esse absens" on Google books, but I can't remember who was the writer. Anyway, is this correct in Latin? The verb "absum" already exists, and it means "to be ...
Antônio Silva's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
542 views

What's the meaning of "lex fundamentum est libertatis, qua fruimur. legum omnes servi sumus, ut liberi esse possimus"?

On the title page of The Works of James Wilson, there's a Latin inscription saying, "lex fundamentum est libertatis, qua fruimur. legum omnes servi sumus, ut liberi esse possimus": What ...
Pound Hash's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
330 views

What did Plautus mean by "intervelli"?

In this line "ne ego homo infelix fui, qui non alas intervelli" what did he mean by "intervelli"? I understand that he's saying he's unlucky because he didn't cut his wings. I ...
Antônio Silva's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
80 views

What is the difference between gradus and passus as a step or pace?

Gradus and passus both have multiple meanings. Passus, as in its meaning related to feet, is also described as a unit of measurement, of five Roman feet. Gradus also has distinct meanings, including ...
fantome's user avatar
  • 465
3 votes
1 answer
524 views

How was damno derived from damnum?

Oxford Latin Dictionary says that damno (tr. condemn) was derived from damnum (n. loss; waning). How is sense "loss, waning" related to and derived from sense "condemn"?
Tim's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
44 views

Correct Latin Translation of "Problem Solver"

I have searched high and low for the best way to translate "Problem Solver". Obviously the first thing that is suggested is "quaestio solver" but I feel that might be incorrect. I ...
V G's user avatar
  • 1
6 votes
1 answer
260 views

What does "labore" mean in this passage of Hugh of Saint Victor?

To be precise, I'm aware labore is generally translated as work, but I'd like to know if it's to be understood as physical work, intellectual work or any kind of work in the following passage of Hugh ...
Useless's user avatar
  • 63
3 votes
0 answers
61 views

What is the Latin translation of ‘The past is a thought’?

I tried Google translate and got praeteritum est cogitatio A friend who studied Latin 30 years ago said correct to the above or praeteritum memoria est However, he wasn’t sure if memoria should ...
Stefano 's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
150 views

PLATO BRONCE ESCUDO HISPAN TE IND REX NG 8R P

Does "Hispan te Ind Rex NG 8R P" mean something like "King of Spain and the Indies"? What would be a more accurate translation? Thank you! "PLATO BRONCE ESCUDO HISPAN TE IND ...
Maurice's user avatar
  • 133
5 votes
1 answer
240 views

Shouldn't adducti in this sentence be feminine?

This is a Ceasar's sentence: Hac oratione adducti inter se fidem et ius iurandum dant et regno occupato per tres potentissimos ac firmissimos populos totius Galliae sese potiri posse sperant. Hac = ...
hellofriends's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
277 views

What is the exact translation of "Frusta me natum"

This is a popular Cicero's sentence from the book de Senectute, chap. 23: ita vixi ut non frusta me natum existimem whose translation is accepted as something like "I lived in such way that I ...
hellofriends's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
309 views

Meaning of a present participle in a verse of Vergil's Eclogue 8

I'm reading Vergil's Eclogue 8, 17–42 in the book Beginning Latin Poetry Reader by Gavin Betts and Daniel Franklin. The first verse is (I write only the long vowels macrons): Nāscere, prāēque diem ...
Charo's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Both 'masculus' and 'vir' mean man/male: what's the difference?

In Latin, masculus means male. Noun masculus m (genitive masculī); second declension a male (of humans or other animals) In Latin, vir also means male. Noun vir m (genitive virī); second ...
user14417's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
108 views

Haud sciō an ego ita dīxerim

In the line 84 page 264 of Lingua Latine per se illustrata, Gubernātor says Haud sciō an ego ita dīxerim, sed pro­ fectō lībertās mihi vītā cārior est. ... The part I am interested is Haud sciō an ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
163 views

¿Qué significa "quoniam igitur"? / What's the meaning of "quoniam igitur"?

En la pagina 262, linea 16, de Lingua latina per se illustrata, la linea empieza con Quoniam igitur ... Según el diccionario ilustrado Vox, quoniam significa puesto que o después que, y igitur ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
250 views

What's the meaning of "paulum satis" in this sentence?

I've found the following sentence in an exercise (pensum A) at the end of chapter XXVI of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana: Paulum satis est ad beātē vīvendum. I don't understand the ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,122
2 votes
2 answers
141 views

What does Una Excelsior mean?

I'm looking for a good phrase to encapsulate "ever upward, together" and i'd like to use Una, Excelsior Any thoughts or other suggestions?
theLeo's user avatar
  • 21
8 votes
0 answers
230 views

Quidquid vs quæcumque

Both quidquid and quæcumque are ways of translating English whatever or all things that [sth.], but is there any difference in meaning in that specific context? I have a vague notion, not based in ...
Rafael's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
854 views

What is this word and what is it doing?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Xenophon. Here Klearchos has basically said: "someone else might want to command at this point". ὡς δὲ τῷ ἀνδρὶ ὃν ἂν ἕλησθε πείσομαι ᾗ δυνατὸν μάλιστα, ἵνα εἰδῆτε ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,163
3 votes
2 answers
909 views

What's the meaning of "soli" in this sentence?

I found the following sentence in https://www.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Victimae_paschali_laudes: Credendum est magis soli Mariae veraci quam ... This appears to be literally translated into More ...
H Koba's user avatar
  • 131
5 votes
1 answer
411 views

What's the role of the word "scribam" in this Cicero's sentence?

This sentence comes from a letter by Cicero to Atticus written when the former is in exile. It can be found in Epistulae ad Atticum 3, 5: Ad te quid scribam nescio. I understand that "nescio&...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,122
2 votes
0 answers
150 views

Idiomatic translation of „lilacs“

I'm searching for an idiomatic translation of the word "lilac(s)" (the deciduous shrub), in the context of its scent. For example, in English, we may would say: She smells of lilacs. I‘d ...
Samuelis Grisseldis's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
280 views

Meaning of ἂν here?

I've read that Ανάβασις is quite a good choice for a first Ancient Greek text to read (i.e. relatively simple). This is a bilingual text from somewhere. Ἀρίστιππος δὲ ὁ Θετταλὸς ξένος ὢν ἐτύγχανεν ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,163
-1 votes
1 answer
186 views

Which senses does ob have in the following words?

Oxford Latin Dictionary says that prep. ob has the following senses: ob prep. In the direction of, towards. In front of or in the way of (so as to block). a. (giving the grounds for an attitude,...
Tim's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
165 views

Are different meanings of quam and -quam related?

In Keller's Learn to Read Latin, I found that quam has several meanings: quam is the singular feminine accusative form of qui (interrogative or relative adj, what, which) quam (interrogative or ...
Tim's user avatar
  • 1
4 votes
2 answers
1k views

What is the gender of the word "Haec" in Latin?

"post haec in terris visus est et cum hominibus conversatus est" I have no knowledge of Latin language. This is a verse from the Latin Vulagate bible. Most translations have this verse ...
Language Enthusiast's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
862 views

Meaning of vagitus

I am trying to understand the connotation of “vagitus” before it was adopted by the English language in the 17th century: According to Etymonline, vagitus crying of a newborn child, 1650s, from Latin ...
Lingo's user avatar
  • 321
2 votes
0 answers
69 views

How strong an equivalence does 'ut' imply?

I'm looking for a nuanced answer here about what kind of connotation 'ut' carries when being used comparatively. Does 'ut' usually have a broad meaning such as the English word 'like' or is it usually ...
Glorius's user avatar
  • 173
1 vote
1 answer
53 views

Can I say "soni sensi" for "of the felt sound"?

So "sonus" + "sentire" would be "sound" + "to feel". And "sonus" + "sensus" (past perf. part of "sentire") would be in agreement. ...
user avatar
16 votes
1 answer
4k views

Both "fēmina" and "mulier" mean "woman": what's the difference?

The word fēmina is used with the meaning "woman": Of human beings, a female, woman (cf.: uxor, mulier, matrona; conjux, marita) (Lewis and Short) (Fēmina also means "female" when ...
Asteroides's user avatar
  • 29.7k
-1 votes
1 answer
202 views

What does "gallus" mean in English? [duplicate]

The scientific name of a chicken is Gallus Gallus Domesticus. What does 'gallus' mean? I think it is related to the Spanish gallo.
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
10 votes
1 answer
532 views

Is there something special about "corpus"?

Metamorphoses Book V, the story of Proserpina. At this point Ceres has just thrown some soup in an impertinent man's face and turned him into a lizard (as you do). mirantem flentemque et tangere ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,163
4 votes
1 answer
228 views

On a Quote from St. Gregory and the Contextual Meaning of the Word `Operator'

Contained in St. Alphonsus Liguori's Dignity and Duties of the Priest or Selva, one finds the following passage in the section on "Sanctity Necessary for the Priest": But St. Bernard says, ...
DDS's user avatar
  • 43
5 votes
2 answers
467 views

Another use of gratia as in exempli gratia

A web search tells us that e.g. stands for exempli gratia where gratia has the literal translation of “for the sake of”. Can anyone give another example from the literature where gratia has this ...
Simd's user avatar
  • 271
5 votes
0 answers
56 views

Why is the phrase negotiorum gestio instead of alienorum gestio?

In Law negotiorum gestio is a form of agency wherein a gestor acts on behalf and for the benefit of a principal without the latter's prior consent. For example, while you are traveling abroad, a ...
George Ntoulos's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
120 views

How to determine when a noun is an objective genitive versus a subjective genitive?

St. Augustine writes in Soliloq. i, 10: nihil esse sentio quod magis ex arce deiiciat animum virilem quam blandimenta feminæ, corporumque ille contactus sine quo uxor haberi non potest. Is the ...
Geremia's user avatar
  • 3,700
1 vote
1 answer
139 views

What would be the name for government for, from, and by

The people Shareholders The king Investors Customers Tax payers Plus explanation. From sources, I've heard that those are Democracy Metochocracy Monarchy Ependocracy Pelatarchy What? I may be wrong....
user4951's user avatar
  • 137
4 votes
1 answer
205 views

Is "Fantasia" a classical Latin word? What was its original meaning?

I'm indecisive as to what title to chose for a novel I finished writing. I went for a pseudo-Latin title : "Apex Fantasia" as it is a fantasy novel. But I still wonder if I can find ...
user11151's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
472 views

What does "Vírgines téneræ" mean?

I´m a native Spanish speaker and I´m reading the book "Método para aprender latín" by Hermann Schnitzler. Right now, I am doing the exercises of the lesson VI (gender of words from the third ...
Diego Velasco's user avatar
5 votes
3 answers
137 views

How "Park"/"square" (view image) is translated in Latin Language please?

Park, small street square, with some threes, banks and water in the middle. http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_CGOn7X3hBUU/TGbpp3dRQ5I/AAAAAAAABZk/AQ8F0yziEJg/w1200-h630-p-k-no-nu/100_5375.JPG http://www....
ephesinus's user avatar
  • 565
4 votes
0 answers
206 views

Has the word 'focus' ever meant 'fire' in Latin literature?

I ask this because in virtually all the Romance languages, the respective descendants simply mean fire, yet when I come across the term in classical literature specifically, it usually meant 'hearth'. ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
190 views

"Odoratus est" in Genesis 8:21

Genesis 8:21 says "Odōrātusque est Dominus odōrem suāvitātis". What is "odoratus est"? It looks like the perfect passive participle of "odoro", but that doesn't make ...
quq's user avatar
  • 63
4 votes
0 answers
74 views

how 'nunc' is used as a correlative?

I came across this sentence in Jerome's letter to Innocentius: "Nunc mihi ēuānēscentibus terrīs ‘caelum undique et undique pontus’ nunc unda tenebrīs horrēscēns et caecā nocte nimbōrum spūmeī ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
570 views

What does the word "numquid" literally mean?

I have come across this word a few times in more later Latin texts. Would this word be merely synonymous with 'num' and 'quid' or is there a different shade of meaning that can be explained through a ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
1k views

Meaning of “universitas litterarum“?

This text I am reading says that the University of Berlin had a ‘universitas litterarum‘. What does that mean?
Sasan's user avatar
  • 153
9 votes
1 answer
860 views

What is the meaning of _voci populi_ in this quote?

There is one quote by Victor Klemperer that reads: But there is no vox populi, only voci populi. which seems to be a bit puzzling. On a wiki-talk page the translation speculation runs with the ...
LаngLаngС's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
366 views

What does "facti" mean in this sentence?

I am starting to read the "Novellae" in the Corpus Iuris Civilis and this sentence from the first one is confusing to read: 'et Tzanī nunc prīmum sub Rōmānōrum factī rēpublicā inter ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
154 views

How to translate this particular phrase? Is it ambiguous?

(From Ovid Apollo and Daphne, book 1 of Metamorphoses) ut canis in vacuo leporem cum Gallicus arvo vidit, et hic praedam pedibus petit, ille salutem; alter inhaesuro similis iam iamque tenere ...
mike rodent's user avatar
  • 1,163
7 votes
1 answer
182 views

Meaning of "Homo Rebus"

I read a literary text originally written in Portuguese, The monologue of hands by Giuseppe Ghiaroni. I can't understand this passage in Latin : O autor do "Homo Rebus" lembra que a mão foi ...
ovide's user avatar
  • 171
5 votes
1 answer
177 views

Gadiovala / Kadiofala meaning

Ksar Sbahi (Or Ksar Sebihi) is a town in the district of Oum El Bouaki, Algeria. Under the Roman occupation, the same town held the name (Gadiovala / Kadiofala). I wonder ir someone can explain the ...
Hamdiken's user avatar
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