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Questions concerning Greek (New Testament or older) either in relation to Latin or in itself. New Testament Greek questions should focus on language, not exegesis.

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A few questions about a Lobel-Page critical note

In a critical note by Lobel-Page, I read: κάλαις ὔμμιν cod. A, quo retento τὸ νόημ[μα] ci. Bekker. quod quamvis cum grammatici verbis aptius congruere videatur, tamen ob ν ἐφελκυστικόν positionem ...
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75 views

About Sappho Edmonds 89 Campbell 48

General background What I gather from Edmonds is that the fragment at hand is found in a letter written by Iulianus (Julian the Apostate?) to Iamblichus, and the "offending" part of the letter reads ...
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51 views

How the Greek word “oikonomia” got meaning of “thrift”?

Some dictionaries seems to include the word "thrift" at the end of definition for oikonomia (good examples here and here): Greek oikonomia "household management, thrift. I would like to know the ...
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49 views

What does Geryon have to do with singing?

One of the Labors of Heracles involved a three-headed giant named Geryon (Γηρυών). I've never seen an explanation for this name, but at first glance it would seem to be connected to γηρύω "to sing" (...
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52 views

What exactly are βροτολοιγῶ?

From Procopius's Secret History (or Arcana Historia) XII.12-14: Διὸ δὴ ἐμοί τε καὶ τοῖς πολλοῖς ἠμῶν οὐδεπώποτε ἔδοξαν οὗτοι ἄνθρωποι εἶναι, ἀλλὰ δαίμονες παλαμναῖοί τινες καὶ ὥσπερ οἱ ποιηταὶ ...
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178 views

Why νώ (rather than νῶ) from νόω? (Greek)

Consider these masculine nominative singular and masculine nominative dual forms: νοῦς, νώ κανοῦν, κανώ μνᾶ, μνᾶ γῆ, γᾶ I understand that the circumflex in these forms represents an acute ...
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66 views

Is there an Ancient Greek verb with this very particular (and nsfw) meaning?

I heard it claimed recently that Ancient Greek had a verb similar to irrumāre, but specifically for irrumātiō performed on a corpse. This seems somewhat absurd, and the claim had no source attached, ...
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718 views

What is “parecbolae”?

Researching an answer for this question, I found a book of regulations of the University of Oxford, dating from the early 19th century. The title is: I cannot find the meaning of Parecbolae anywhere. ...
3
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1answer
46 views

Translating the 道德經 into Greek

I’m currently doing Chinese winter school, and I thought I would try to translate the first line of the daodejing into Greek, as a fun exercise. Can you help correct my grammar? :) ´ο λογος τουτον ...
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45 views

How would one translate “The God-Machine”?

In the Chronicles of Darkness role-playing game, one of the major antagonists is called "the God-Machine": a machine so powerful it seems similar to a god. I know Latin generally prefers not to stick ...
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63 views

When did the Romans start using Z?

Several of my recent questions have touched on the letter Z, which was introduced fairly late to the alphabet (it's disappeared from its Phoenician position and been added back in at the end, in its ...
7
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58 views

Why does the verb πολυπραγμονεῖν use the noun stem and not the verb stem? (Greek)

In Plato's Republic, Socrates sets forth the following idea, which he later refutes: τὸ τὰ αὑτοῦ πράττειν καὶ μὴ πολυπραγμονεῖν δικαιοσύνη ἐστί, justice is to do one's own business and not to ...
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51 views

Help translating some Attic Greek

I am attempting to translate the following, and I'm feeling completely lost: τὸν ἐκείνου φίλον οὐ περὶ πολλοῦ ποιεῖσθε The best I've come up with is not concerning many women you all consider ...
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58 views

Is there any explanation for the formation of “bomphiologia” as a Greek word for “verborum bombus”?

Recently on ELU, a question was asked about the meaning of three rhetorical terms that are obviously based on Greek: “macrologia”, “periergia” and “bomphiologia”. The Greek etymologies of "macrologia"...
5
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2answers
53 views

Is there any relation between Bellerophon and belua?

I know this is a long shot, one word being Greek and the other Latin, but is it at all possible for there to be a relation between Bellerophon, the slayer of beasts, and belua "beast"? A cursory ...
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2answers
154 views

What is the proper Greek title for the Moriae Encomium of Erasmus?

I'm asking here because I think the In Praise of Folly wiki may have an error in the Greek transliteration: Μωρίας ἐγκώμιον (Morias enkomion) My initial thought was the gamma is the typo, and that ...
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27 views

How did σσ differ from σ?

Varro mentioned in this answer: I think it's highly likely that originally Greek σσ had a distinct sound from σ which made it a closer match to a foreign [ʃ] than σ would have been, which is why it ...
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47 views

Etymology of Ἀσκληπιός (Greek)

There are different theories on the etymology of Asclepius, all of which I want to understand. According to Wikipedia: The etymology of the name is unknown. In his revised version of Frisk's ...
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40 views

Is the sigmatic future related to the sigmatic aorist?

When I was learning Ancient Greek, I was taught that most verbs had three basic stems corresponding to the different aspects: imperfective -λυ-, aoristic -λυσ-, and perfective -λελυκ-. Adding an ...
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50 views

Are there iota or hypsilon contract verbs?

In Greek, verbs are classified as "consonant-stem" or "vowel-stem". Vowel-stem verbs, aptly, have a vowel at the end of their stem. And in the Attic dialect, if this vowel is a short alpha, epsilon, ...
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Why were Roman dramas and actors judged inferior to Greek ones, when the former based on the latter?

Source: The Well-Educated Mind (2 edn 2016), pp. 254-255.   Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides wrote tragedies; Aristophanes wrote comedies. Comedy, depending as it does on contemporary man- ...
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2answers
96 views

Quintilian's name in Ancient Greek

I just saw a Quora post stating the Romanian spelling "cvorum", "cvintuplu", "cvartet" proves the Romans pronounced qu as kv. I tried to back up the contrary claim with Latin-to-Greek transliterations,...
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Did Alexander the Great change the meaning of “Hellenes”?

The Hellenistic era was launched by Alexander the Great, and his death is usually defined as the starting point. The Greek word Hellenes (Ἕλληνες) was in use before, during, and after the Hellenistic ...
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121 views

The Articles ὁ/τοῦ/τὸν in Classical Greek Names (Greek)

Reading the Book of Mark, I come across these references to Jesus: Mark 1:24 Ἰησοῦ Ναζαρηνέ Mark 14:67 τοῦ Ναζαρηνοῦ Mark 16:6 τὸν Ναζαρηνὸν And elsewhere in the Bible the common: Ἰησοῦς ὁ ...
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432 views

Latin transliteration of Ιησούς

Can someone please show me how the Latin Iesus came from Iesous? It sounds like a shorter form of it. Is it just because certain sounds from the Greek wasn't in Latin?
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What is the diminutive of κῆτος?

A classic diminutive suffix in Ancient Greek is -ίδιον, which forms a neuter second noun. But what happens when this is applied to a noun with a vowel in the stem? For a concrete example, if I wanted ...
3
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1answer
76 views

About certain emendations to Sappho Edmonds 76 Campbell 147

In Sappho Edmonds 76 Campbell 147, the tradition gives μνάσασθαί τινα φάμη καὶ ἔτερον ἀμμέων. I can see why one would amend this to μνάσασθαί τινά φαμι καὶ ὔστερον/ἄψερον ἀμμέων on metrical grounds, ...
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124 views

Is δέ an adversative or copulative particle?

Is δέ an adversative or copulative particle? This is the Greek analogue of my Latin question "Is autem an adversative or copulative particle?"
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What is analysis in Latin?

The word "analysis" is found in some form in a number of languages, and it is of Greek origin. I could not think of a Latin term meaning "analysis" (as the word is used today, which may or may not be ...
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165 views

ἔερθαι: valid verb form? What verb?

This is l. 28 (the last line) of P.Sapph. Obbink: I read it as: ΝΘ̣€Ρ+ . . +Ι̣ where the uncertain theta could be an epsilon (Obbink reads €̣) and the pluses denote a blank spot in the papyrus, ...
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1answer
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When transliterating from Latin to Greek, what kind of rho is used?

In Latin there is only one type of R and as far as I know the combination RH does not appear in native Latin words. The corresponding Greek letter rho can have two kinds of breathing (rough ῥ, ...
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359 views

The disappearance of digamma

Do we know why the Greek letter digamma (ϝ) fell out of use? The letter continued to have indirect effects despite disappearing from writing. Was it still pronounced despite not being written, or ...
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Comparing -logists and -nomists

Various words for professions end in -logist or -nomist. I hope I do not do terrible injustice by treating -nomer as a synonym for -nomist. These seem to come from the Greek words logos and nomos and ...
3
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1answer
60 views

About the “Gongyla poem”: who proposed the perfect imperative?

In 1972, Greek composer Μάνος Χατζιδάκις released an album called Ο Μεγάλος Ερωτικός. This album featured a version of the Gongyla poem (LP-Campbell 22 part 2, Edmonds 45, P.Oxy. 1231 fr. 15 - and 12 ...
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114 views

What is the earliest known word borrowed from Latin to Greek?

There was a great cultural borrowing of ideas from Greece to Rome, and a number of Greek words ended up being borrowed to Latin. But it must have happened the other way, too, at some point. What is ...
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2answers
122 views

Where did the name Ulixes come from?

He's Odysseus in Homer, but how did he become Ulixes/Ulysses when he arrived (so to speak) in Rome, where there were many people who knew him from the Iliad and the Odyssey? And was there a separate ...
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About Sappho Edmonds 69 Lobel-Page 54 Campbell 54: why the emendation of the participle?

The manuscript tradition for the fragment in the title gives us: ἔλθοντ' ἐξ ὀράνω πορφυρίαν ἔχοντα προϊέμενον χλάμυν For reasons of meter, deleting the ἔχοντα is basically mandatory. However, why ...
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115 views

Did any other letters than sigma ever have separate end-of-word variants?

In a comment to my recent question on the origin of the two forms of sigma, Rafael pointed out that in Arabic most letters have separate forms for initial, middle, and final positions. However, in ...
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1answer
121 views

How and when did we get two forms of sigma?

The Greek letter sigma (σ) has a different form (ς) when used at the end of a word. This distinction seems unnecessary to me, and it's not clear why it would emerge. Do we know why and ...
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60 views

What form of Greek was studied by ancient Romans?

Greek is not a single language, but it had various dialects and evolved significantly over time. What form of Greek did the Romans who spoke classical Latin study? Was it contemporary for the purpose ...
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150 views

Why σελήνη instead of ἑλήνη?

The Greek word for the moon is σελήνη selēnē, σελᾱνᾱ selānā, or σελάννᾱ selánnā, depending on dialect. All seem to come transparently from the same root as σέλας sélas, "shine". But since these both ...
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2answers
95 views

Did the ancients write that their sculpture is painted?

I have the impression that for a long time scholars thought that ancient Greek and Roman sculpture was unpainted, and marble statues would be wholly white, but the modern consensus is that sculpture ...
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2answers
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Antecedent of a Greek pronoun in the Critias

I was reading through Plato's (incomplete) Critias yesterday and came across the following passage: δίκης δὴ κλήροις τὸ φίλον λαγχάνοντες κατῴκιζον τὰς χώρας, καὶ κατοικίσαντες, οἷον νομῆς ποίμνια, ...
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37 views

To What Extent Was Classical Latin Affected by Classical Greek?

To what extent was Classical Latin influenced by Classical Greek in areas such as pronunciation, grammar, literature, etc.? I would appreciate a quick overview of the list of influences Greek had on ...
3
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1answer
65 views

Greek word for battery

What might a Greek have called a modern battery? I think a good Latin word would be accumulator (cf. German), but don't know how well something corresponding would work in Greek (or what it would be)....
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65 views

Translating “Pigasus” into Greek

That is it. What would be the Greek for "Pigasus"? Does one simply replace the eta in "Πήγασος" for an iota? By "Pigasus" I refer to this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pigasus_(literature) So, a ...
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How did “glutaeus/gluteus” come from Greek “gloutos”? Would “glutiaeus” be more correct?

In anatomy, the muscles of the buttocks are referred to collectively as the "glut(a)eal muscles" in English, and are individually given the following Latin names: glut(a)eus maximus, glut(a)eus medius ...
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Pentheus as “Divine Suffering”

Q: Can the etymology of Πενθεύς truly be divorced from divinity? Here's a name that even Graves translates merely as "grief". But as a student of Graves, this is one his translation may be too ...
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1answer
66 views

Is there such a thing as the accusativus cum participio (a.c.p)? If not, what is this? (Greek)

This is not a hermeneutics question, but rather, a Greek grammar question inspired by a verse from the Bible. Adverbial clauses are common to English, Ancient Greek, and Latin, and I believe there is ...
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179 views

The length of the final vowel in first declension nouns (Greek)

How can you tell whether a first declension noun ends in a short or long vowel? Background When the word is written and accented, I may be able to tell. (Not always. E.g. θύρᾱ if without the macron)...