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Questions tagged [classical-latin]

Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

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Use of the perfect to indicate "whenever I do someting"

In the following sentence I do understand the reason the perfect is used for veni: rure meo possum quidvis perferre patique; ad mare cum veni, generosum et lene requiro ("In my country estate I ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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from dēfēcisse to deficisse

My question concerns the forms dēfēcisse (dēficio, active infinitive perfect) and the variant dēficisse. I found both forms in a text from Justin/Trogus (Epitome.11.2.7) : In cuius apparatu occupato ...
suizokukan's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
106 views

Reason for ablative case in "praesidioque decorique parentibus esse"

In Lucretius II 641–643 "aut quia significant divam praedicere ut armis ac virtute velint patriam defendere terram praesidioque parent decorique parentibus esse." I am not very comfortable ...
Arnaud Mégret's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
3k views

What's the most common word in Latin?

A comment recently mentioned that the most common word in English is "the", which is odd since it has no direct Latin equivalent. That made me realize: I'm not sure what the most common word ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 answers
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Can someone help translating "one must die for one to live"

I'm writing a novel and at some point, the hero needs to make a sacrifice: "One must die for one to live." He has to chose between two people: only one will survive, the other one will die. (...
Rory's user avatar
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1 answer
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Have these Greek letters been related to these Latin/English letters?

Was each following Latin/English letter originated from, cognate with, or related to the Greek letter given after the Latin/English letter? Latin f and Greek phi Latin h or e, and Greek eta Latin j ...
Tim's user avatar
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What are the Greek or Latin words for these SI prefixes?

Smith's Greek and Latin Roots gives the etymology of a few SI prefixes. For example, tera- is from Greek teras ("monster"), deci- from Latin decem, and micro- from Greek mikros ("small&...
Tim's user avatar
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Example request: accusative neuter nouns in any classical prose text

Is anyone able to provide me with about five sentences from any Latin classical text (one or more), excluding poetry or plays, where a NEUTER noun (any) is unambiguously employed in the accusative as ...
Harry's user avatar
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1 answer
106 views

Does Latin have sentences or just clauses?

When I learnt about the pronoun "suus", I was originally taught that it always referred to the subject at the start of the sentence. Having read some original Livy, I am not confused as I ...
Joyce Morley's user avatar
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Is khrysodory Athenaie the accurate way to say Athena's golden spear?

The closest I have come is khrysodory Athenaie (χρυσόδόρυ Αθηναία). Since I am piecing this together from the internet, I am uncertain if this is correct. I have also pieced together the latin, which ...
Walter's user avatar
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Translate: “If God Is For Me.”

If God is for us, who can be against us?” - Romans 8:31 Looking to translate, “If God is for me.” from English to Latin.
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How would the term golden shaft be translated in Latin?

There is a epithet for the greek goddess Artemis, Khryselakatos (Χρυσηλάκατος), which means "of the Golden Shaft." How would one translate that into Latin? The closest I can determine would ...
Walter's user avatar
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Check my Latin: Note on Ovid’s use of the name Appias. (A fountain, a nymph, and a bunch of lawyers.)

Ovid uses the words Appias or Appiades on three occasions (Ars Amatoria 1.79-88 and 3.447-452; Remedia Amoris 659-660) to refer jokingly to the legal business conducted in the Forum of Julius Caesar. ...
Patricius's user avatar
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Unusual grammar in Ars Amatoria 1.509 f: 'a nulla tempora comptus acu'

I'm reading the Ars Amatoria in Hans Ørberg's annotated edition, this is book 1.509 f: Forma viros neglecta decet. Minoida Theseus abstulit, a nulla tempora comptus acu; I get the sense: "It ...
consistebat's user avatar
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1 answer
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Ancient Greek-Latin and Latin-Ancient Greek books II

Is there any book of comparative Ancient Greek-Latin text-based teaching? (I am talking about a parallel method containing e.g. latin texts' fragments translated in ancient greek with comparative ...
SK_'s user avatar
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1 answer
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Why would an accusative become the subject in Tacitus, Annales 1.28?

I am translating Tacitus's Annales 1.28 and the first line is "noctem minacem et in scelus erupturam fors leniuit: ..." When looking at other people's translation they have said "The ...
Pip's user avatar
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3 answers
832 views

Which form of Latin pronunciation is most widely taught?

There are two popular versions of Latin pronunciation currently: the Ecclesiastical Pronunciation and the Classical Pronunciation. EP follows the rules of Italian pronunciation (has soft c and g) ...
Akshat Goswami's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
288 views

Translation of "Qua de causa"

This is a from the very beginning of the Caesar's De Bello Gallico. The first question is about its translation as "For which reason". In English, it's supposed to be in a single sentence , ...
Maizi Wu's user avatar
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0 answers
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Next book/learning tool

What would you suggest as a next step for books or learning tools for Classical Latin? In the last 4 years I've completed Duolingo Latin, read Lingua Latina and Cambridge Latin a few times along with ...
Nimuey's user avatar
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1 answer
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Is Vulgar Latin just an artificial or constructed version of Classical Latin?

According to what I researched, Vulgar Latin was not standardized like Classical Latin and it was just everyday speech and it evolved into Romance languages that used Vulgar Latin pronounciation. ...
Akshat Goswami's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
552 views

How to say 'I miss you' in Latin

How can I say "I miss you" in the sense that one misses someone and desires to be again with this someone nonetheless it is alive or death? My dicctionary only list: miror, which is more ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
219 views

Grammar of rogatum auxilium, askee modified instead of asker

In the following passage from De Bello Gallico 11, I do not understand why rogatum apparently agrees with Caesar (or maybe modifies auxilium?) instead of legatos: Aedui, cum se suaque ab eis defendere ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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What's difference between a "stagnum" and "lacuna"?

I'm trying to give title to a earth (no pluvial) water "puddle" of photo
ephesinus's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
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Reimagining the logical gates in Latin

Boolean logic has logical gates which have the following truth tables: NON gate: Input Output 0 1 1 0 AND gate: Input A Input B Output 0 0 0 0 1 0 1 0 0 1 1 1 NAND gate: Input A Input B ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
165 views

How can I avoid ambiguity when using terms with declinations included in phrases?

By the question Nested genitive?, it is possible to say "gas mask of my friend" as persona gasi amící meí, but this kind of nested genitives are prone to ambiguity in the general case, so is ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
121 views

Lanius non laneo. Evolution

I am trying to do the evolution from Classical Latin to Vulgar Latin of this word: Lanius non laneo. Could someone help me? What are the changes that occur? I was thinking of a diphthongation but I'm ...
Anna's user avatar
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-2 votes
4 answers
313 views

If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you

I am trying to translate the phrase If the laws of physics no longer apply in the future, god help you. I have some problems to decide how to translate no longer to Latin*, in Spanish it would be more ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
84 views

Attemping to translate the song "Alright"

Given that some look like that don't understand the importance of macros here is some reference by ScorpioMartinus where explains that speaking Latin without their macros is like speaking German ...
Elelphantus's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
161 views

Attempt to translate the song "Still Alive"

Important note Given that some looks like that don't understand the importance of macros here is some reference by ScorpioMartinus where explains that speaking Latin without their macros is like ...
Elelphantus's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
151 views

¿Cómo se dice "valor" de ser apreciado en alguna manera por algún observador?

(English version below.) Quiero escribir en latín un pequeño ensayo sobre los diferentes tipos del valor que uno le da a las cosas, pero mi diccionario español-latín me esta dando solamente para ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
-2 votes
1 answer
204 views

How would you translate Socialism/Communism into Latin?

Note that both socialism and communist have been synonyms their appearance in the romance Sprachen until the end of the times, unless you believe Stalin's lies. Therefore both a word based in the stem*...
Dolphínus's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
765 views

Tacitus Germania XIV: Cum ventum in aciem

This is clear in meaning but I am confused with the ventum itself. It seems the ventum here is either supine or PPP. But either one does not really fit my understanding of them. Can someone tell me ...
Ken Yang's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
303 views

What is the role of "ipso" in this quote from Cicero?

Following on from Q: Why is accusative pronoun "te" used in this construction?, in this quote from Cicero: "nihil necesse est mihi de me ipso dicere, quamquam est id quidem senile ...
tony's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
400 views

What's the role of the word "scribam" in this Cicero's sentence?

This sentence comes from a letter by Cicero to Atticus written when the former is in exile. It can be found in Epistulae ad Atticum 3, 5: Ad te quid scribam nescio. I understand that "nescio&...
Charo's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
86 views

Lepus: "lepusculus". Longus: "longusculus" or "longiculus"

-iculus or -usculus for "Longus"?, please
ephesinus's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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How does this apposition work?

I'm reading Wheelock's Latin and I stumbled across this passage at page 90: Nōn amo tē, Sabidī, nec possum dīcere quārē. Hoc tantum possum dīcere: nōn amo tē. Why is the name Sabidius used with the ...
susdomesticus's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
94 views

Which Latin Translations of Modern Literature Stay True to Classical Latin?

While exploring the List of Latin translations of modern literature, I was drawn to Hobbitus Ille, translated by Mark Walker. However, based on reviews from Amazon.com and Texkit, it seems the ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
135 views

Is the expression "ut poësis pictura" formally correct?

I'm writing an essay in which I'd like to use the expression "ut poësis pictura" with the intent of flipping the original expression by Horace "ut pictura poësis". I never studied ...
pat's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
1k views

Why is this Etruscan letter sometimes transliterated as "ch"?

I've noticed that the Etruscan letter 𐌙 is sometimes transliterated as "ch", as you can see in the following image of an information panel in the Hypogeum of the Volumnus family:            ...
Charo's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
178 views

Sextus Empiricus and Latin

I am learning Latin from Duolingo and when i finish Duolingo, i am planning to move to Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata, the famous book. In this context i am wondering that when i finish these two, ...
Nabla's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
518 views

Does "laviniaque" from Vergil's Aeneid point to Romance palatalization?

The second i in "laviniaque" from the 2nd line of Aeneid is supposed to be consonantal to fit the hexameter; therefore the pronunciation should be something like: /la'wi.nja.qʷe/. My ...
VivatLinguaLatina's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
609 views

"Non splendeat toga, ne sordeat quidem"

In Seneca's Epistulae morales ad Lucilium (Letter 5): Non splendeat toga, ne sordeat quidem. What exactly does ne...quidem mean here? It is certainly not "not even? In Leob we read the ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
632 views

How do I say "Humanism" in Latin?

Humanism is coined from a Latin root (homo, hominis) and a Greek suffix (-ισμός). Would there be a "purely Latin" translation of this word?
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0 votes
0 answers
43 views

How to say Power above the Sovereign…?

I’d like to know how to say a couple of expressions in Latin. 1- “Power above the Sovereign” 2- “The Sovereigns power above the Sovereign power”. About the first one, I don’t know if “above” should be ...
Daniel Sister's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
781 views

Use of 'suus' in 'ignoranti quem portum petat nullus suus ventus est'

Seneca, Epistolae LXXI: ignoranti quem portum petat nullus suus ventus est commonly translated as 'he who does not know which port he is heading to has no favourable wind'. Could anyone explain what ...
Alexandre's user avatar
  • 481
6 votes
1 answer
671 views

References to "coin tossing", "heads or ships", or "navia aut caput"

Dear Latin or Greek experts, I'm doing a project on the statistics of coin tossing. I would like to provide some references to ancient Greek, Roman, or other texts that reference the practice of coin ...
WiggyStardust's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
183 views

Can we use "numquam" with a imperative?

In English(in Portuguese, as well) we can use the adverb "nunquam" with an imperative "Never do/say/etc something! I'm asking because when I read the dictionaries, I never see a ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
40 views

I need to translate a phrase "From the bottom of my heart, to the root"

The phrase is "From the bottom of my heart, to the root" I need it in Latin, I researched it and I found that the phrase is "Ab imo pectore ad radices", but I need to be sure. ...
Darian's user avatar
  • 1
4 votes
1 answer
881 views

How to say They came, they saw, they conquered in Latin?

I would like to translate the famous Julius Caesar quote into the third person plural: They Came, They Saw, They Conqurered.
Anna Ni Fhiannusa's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
94 views

To what degree Latin proper accents are known and taught?

NOTE: After comment by @Draconis and others: I have used the term "accent" as per Webster: effort in speech to stress one syllable over adjacent syllables. Sorry if this is not the ...
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