Questions tagged [classical-latin]

Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

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3answers
192 views

First sentence of “De Legibus”

It says "Lucus quidem ille et haec Arpinatium quercus agnoscitur", but shouldn't "agnoscuntur" be used instead? As it says "the grove and those oak trees of Arpinums are recognized(by me)". I'm still ...
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1answer
26 views

Analysis of Dative in >>Confessions<<

In Caput VI Liber II Augustine wrote:"Quamvis mihi nondum fideli......" (Although I was not a Christian...) Here he used the dative case (mihi fideli). What's the dative case for? Why is it dative? ...
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48 views

Are there unprefixed location verbs in Latin?

Two basic types of prefixed denominal locative verbs can be distinguished in Latin: the ones in (1) can be said to “agglutinate” a prepositional phrase expressing (dis)location, i.e., the place (cf. ...
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44 views

Gender and etymology of name “Herena”

I found that Herena is the name of a Christian saint from the 3rd century. Virtually nothing is known about Herena's life, but my question is about the name: Is it a feminine name or masculine, or ...
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2answers
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How to translate the phrases “both worlds” and “the best of both worlds” into Classical Latin?

How to properly write the expression "the best of both worlds" and the shorter phrase "both worlds" (meant in the same context as in the larger phrase) in Classical Latin?
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29 views

Online Latin Synonyms and Other Crossword Resources

Are there any online searchable synonym lists, i.e. thesauri? I don't mean scanned versions of books, I mean apps or search engines that list synonyms given a specific search word. I am interested in ...
2
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1answer
94 views

Was there a standard accent in Latin in the Roman era?

I know that the standard language was Classical Latin and that the average person spoke Vulgar Latin, but was there a standard dialect, a standard pronounciation for Latin? Like the way it was spoken ...
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43 views

Sideros sidereus

How would one best combine the Latin “sidereus” and the Greek “σίδηρος” in an otherwise-English-language text to refer to meteoric iron? Ideally in a manner that would be authentic to ancient Roman ...
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1answer
44 views

How can I say “school/university of life” in Latin?

I want to translate "school/university of life" into Latin. Meaning, where you learn about life. Thank you in advance.
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47 views

What is the prerequisite of reading Cicero or Caesar?

Beside grammar, how much vocabulary do I have to know? Should I buy some latin dictionary like Oxford Latin Dictionary? Or is there any word-correction for novice learner?
4
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1answer
222 views

Latinisation of a surname. Seeking advice from expert Latinists

I have a need to Latinise a surname (details about that name are provided further down in my question) rather urgently, but with my miniscule knowledge of Latin I cannot do that myself well. I hope ...
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1answer
106 views

Translation of ab and de in Greek,

How would one best translate ab and de from Latin to Greek in order to capture the different nuances? In Greek both are usually translated as από. I am trying to capture the nuances so I am using ...
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1answer
143 views

How to say 'I am myself'?

I'm still figuring out the difference between the various ways to say 'I', 'me', and 'myself' in Latin. My best guess for this phrase is 'Ego sum memet', but I'm not sure which case the second word ...
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57 views

Learning from scratch [duplicate]

I am interested in learning Latin. I have tried to find good resources to do this online but have found a great deal of noise. Does anyone have any good recommendations of how to properly learn Latin ...
2
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1answer
152 views

What is the word for “now” in Classical Latin?

I found that the translation for the word "now" is "nunc." Is it correct that in the Latin language that there only exists capital letters and that the letter "U" is "V"? If so, would it be correct ...
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1answer
177 views

What is the longest sequence of ablative/dative nouns ever to appear in Latin texts

I was intrigued by my question to ask this question. In that questions we have a sequence of 2 ablative nouns in a row: "[Dama] differt a capreis [solis] cornibus ..." I don't count solis because ...
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1answer
90 views

How would learning Latin only to read Latin change the way I should learn it?

So I studied GCSE Latin but there was no English to Latin on the Exam, we only ever had to read in Latin or translate from Latin into English. So my question is this: If I wanted to learn to read and ...
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1answer
80 views

Maxima - a speech competition?

At some point in childhood I learnt there were speech competitions in ancient Rome when people would express complex ideas in very few words. And I believed since those short sentences called "maxima" ...
4
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1answer
112 views

How does one express adjectives in the present tense in Latin which aren't everlasting?

Exempli gratia, how would one say 'I am perturbed' in Latin opposed to 'I am human'? The state of being perturbed can change, but the state of being a human being cannot change, so how does one write ...
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1answer
77 views

How would you translate this sentence?

I am currently working on a translation passage adapted from Livy 43.4 by Ashley Carter, titled Hortensius at Abdera, but got stuck only a few lines into it. Here is the sentence that I am struggling ...
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58 views

Negotia Essentialia and Essentialia Negotii

As Per Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials. Did the Classical Roman Scholars in Roman Law use Essentialia Negotii? Wouldn't it be more gramatical to use Negotia Essentialia to refer to ...
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72 views

Is “mobile (vulgus)” used to refer to a “mob”?

According to Wiktionary, the English term "mob" (as in group of people) comes from the Middle English "mobile", which comes from the Latin "mobile (vulgus)" (a moving crowd). Is this meaning attested ...
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2answers
156 views

How do I say “I own myself” in Latin?

I am trying to grasp the difference between "I" and "myself" in Latin. How would the phrase "I own myself" translate to Latin?
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Translation of “Love makes it grow” in Latin for my tattoo

Thank you very much for all your replies. However the answers do not exactly match the meaning. "Love makes [anything] grow." — This anything can be anything — a person, work, condition, ...
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155 views

Seneca’s Epistula Moralis XLI: “God” or “a god”?

The Loeb translation by Richard M. Gummere of Seneca's Epistula XLI, "On the God Within Us": Non sunt ad caelum elevandae manus nec exorandus aedituus ut nos ad aurem simulacri, quasi magis ...
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2answers
250 views

Advenit versus Venit

In Cap. VII of LLPSI, Ørberg introduces Advenit with the following sentence Ecce Iulius ad villam advenit. It's curious to me that the verb includes the preposition; why not just use venit alone ...
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3answers
252 views

Does Latin have any Portmanteau words?

English has many examples of portmanteau words (e.g. "motel" is a combination of "motor" and "hotel"). Does Latin have any such phenomena?
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266 views

Doubt on pronunciation of verbs (stressing)

I have recently heard somebody (quoting Virgil) saying "Timèo Danaos...". This sounds awkward to me, but I confess I have not studied Latin for ages. I remember that timeo is a verb like moneo, II ...
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1answer
79 views

Found eius but pēius in the same text: is it some kind of mistake?

While I was reading Lingua Latina per se Illustrata - Familia Romana, I noted something: the vocabulary list has ĕius but pēius, is that by accident? Also I noted meī as mēī in line 92 of chapter 25, ...
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1answer
46 views

Translation of “the past shall live” into Latin

I am translating the motto, "The Past Shall Live" into classical Latin. Currently, I have Praeteritum Vivet, which I think makes sense, but I'd appreciate the input of those more skilled than I.
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1answer
62 views

Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar - Could some one please help to translate this

Could someone please help to transtale "Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar" to English? Many thanks and best regards, Phuong
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41 views

How was the original Ovid Metamorphoses formatted/punctuated most likely?

What punctuation was used in Classical Latin? was very insightful, but it doesn't go into specifics. Wikipedia said we don't have any original sources of Ovid's Metamorphoses until the 9th or 10th ...
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77 views

How did the Romans salute the Republic?

Are there any known phrases that were used by Romans to celebrate or cheer for the Republic? Something like Ave Res Publica ? Or maybe they'd cheer for something else, like for the Senate or for the ...
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2answers
78 views

Translate “Crater Lake” into classical Latin

From what I have read of this post, Latin doesn't really use nouns as adjectives in the way that English does, although that post mentions you can use a noun in genitive case to achieve this. I am ...
6
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1answer
378 views

Translate “loyal animal” into classical Latin

I am translating the short phrase "loyal animal", or "faithful animal" into classical Latin. In this case, "animal" is intentionally very broad - I don't want to limit it to just domesticated animals ...
5
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1answer
133 views

How did the Romans refer to people of unknown gender?

Reference to other people's gender has become a delicate issue in today's world. I expect that the Romans had no controversy over it, but they must have encountered situations where they have to write ...
5
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1answer
133 views

Generic toast in classical Latin

Was there a generic toast that Romans would say to each other when drinking, along the lines of Cheers, or Sláinte. It doesn't need to have the meaning of those so much as have the same cultural usage:...
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2answers
50 views

Indirect questions and the passive subjunctive

How would you translate: "He asked if the the city had been captured?" Quaerit num civitatem captum esse? Here I am using an accusative (captum) plus infinitive (esse). Am I right? Thank you!
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1answer
114 views

Pronunciation of “Formulæ”

What is the pronunciation of Formulæ in Latin ? Is there any difference (in pronunciation) between classical and vulgar Latin ? The answer can be in International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) format.
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1answer
2k views

Translate “Everything burns” into classical Latin

In a project of mine I have an event which was named "everything burns", or potentially "Everything burned" (I am open to both tenses). What would this be in classical Latin? I tentatively have this ...
4
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1answer
69 views

Translate “collective unconscious” into Latin

I would like to translate the phrase "collective unconscious" coined by Carl Jung, into classical Latin. It does not need to be a literal translation as long as it conveys the same concept of a shared ...
7
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1answer
417 views

Diminutive -ula

I didn't find -ula among the diminutive endings discussed on this site in the question "Constructing Latin diminutives." Hadrian's famous poem "Animula vagula, blandula" uses these 3 diminutives plus "...
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1answer
43 views

reus et debitor

I run into this sentence of the Digest - D.9.2.54 Legis Aquiliae debitori competit actio, cum reus stipulandi ante moram promissum animal vulneraverit. I understand that the person who has ...
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1answer
45 views

Explanatory and Etymological dictionary of the Latin Language

With the term explanatory I am translating ερμηνευτικό. A dictionary which defines words comprehensively and clearly. If one considers Oxford University to be the authority on the English language ...
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2answers
104 views

Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials

So essentialia negotii is transaction's essentials. How would one say The transaction's essential things, transactions' essential things, essential things of the transaction and essential things of ...
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2answers
790 views

Is the adjective in latin put after the noun or before?

E.g Is the legal term essentialia negotii correct use of the grammar(declension, agreement, word order) rules or not? Should it not be negotiorum essentialium so that the case, the number and the ...
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2answers
118 views

Is the locative used with multi-part city names?

The Duolingo Latin course mentions New York a lot. (I'd rather have it focused on the geography of ancient Italy than the modern US, but that's beside the point now.) The locative comes up regularly: ...
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2answers
212 views

What is a “robot” in Latin?

I read in Wikipedia the word robotum and robotor. Also, there is automaton, and androides. I don't see such a word in the [short online version of the] Lexicon Recentis Latinatis by the Vatican (which ...
5
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1answer
134 views

What is “heart” as the emotional organ?

In English one uses the word "heart" in a variety of ways to express deep emotion, as in "She will always be in our hearts". Is there a corresponding "emotional organ" in Latin? How should I go about ...
4
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1answer
65 views

Do Latin novellas exist to help develop vocabulary for reading Vergil's Aeneid?

I'm taking a 4th semester Latin class in which we are jumping right into Vergil's Aeneid, said to be quite difficult. We were discussing the relatively recent phenomenon of 'novellas' being written in ...

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