Questions tagged [classical-latin]

Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

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2
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0answers
21 views

"Paper shuffler" equivalent in modern or ancient Greek

Not really a Paper Shuffler but I am looking for a word that describes a person who knows all the unnecessary details in a business or activity but doesn't really understand the whole idea or the real ...
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Latin Perfect Tense and romance languages particularly Portuguese

How did the perfect tense evolve in each romance language? For example is the Preterito Perfeito functionally equivalent to the Latin Perfect Tense? Heri dormivi. Ontem dormi. Ayer dormi. Hier j'ai ...
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1answer
68 views

What are the verb conjugation names called in Latin?

What are the terms in Latin for the Latin verb conjugations? I would like to also know the Latin for the mixed conjugation (or if preferred that known as the io sub conjugation) and any term for verbs ...
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1answer
320 views

Translation of building inscription regarding architect of Alcantara Bridge

The Alcantara Bridge in the Extremadura region of Spain is one of the oldest structures extant whose architect is known by name. It spans the Tagus River near the modern-day border of Spain and ...
6
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1answer
128 views

What adjectives did the Romans use to describe skin color?

The Romans surely met peoples of different skin color in their interactions between Gauls and Africans and many others. I assume that there were clear color differences back then and that the Romans ...
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2answers
549 views

Did the Romans use 'animus' and 'anima' together?

The words animus and anima are pretty close to each other, and their difference has been explored on this site before. In order to understand their nuances in classical Latin I would like to see an ...
6
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1answer
133 views

Which gender for words "Magnificum Consilium"

I would like to name a product in Latin because I find it original and attractive language. I was looking for a translation for the words "great advice" so I found "Magnificus Consilium&...
5
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1answer
138 views

More detailed translation of a passage

In the book «Elementos de Retórica» by the 18th-century Spanish priest and latinist Calixto Hornero, there is the following sentence (link to 1815 edition): Cernere est plurimos, qui sibi parum ...
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2answers
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Is this the entire corpus of Latin up to 200 AD?

The Packard Humanities Institute (PHI) Latin Texts site claims to have 'essentially' all of the texts from before 200 AD plus a few others. Is this really all of the text from before 200 AD? I would ...
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2answers
2k views

Did Romans have only one suffix -uus?

I stumbled across this comment on using the "v" and "u" in the “linguistics” forum. My question is: what does "The Romans would not have differentiated the symbols" mean?...
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1answer
83 views

How do Latins distinguished short or long vowels? [duplicate]

How did Latins distinguish short or long vowels when they read a text? Does exist any rule such as open / closed syllable?
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On the syntactic distribution of ablative gerund and nominative present participle

I've always taken it for granted that in Classical Latin nominative present participles cannot be replaced by ablative gerunds without a meaning change. For example, in the following case the ...
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1answer
130 views

Which preposition should be used with contrario and why?

Is it better to say argumentum a/ab contrario or e/ex contrario? It seems that both are acceptable but in most Romance languages it is a contrario. The movement out/from is not clear/explicit/graphic ...
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1answer
603 views

Are prepositions really never used with cities?

We're taught that the names of cities and small islands do not use prepositions for being in, going into, or leaving these places: It's not in Roma but Romae. It's not in Romam but Romam. It's not e/...
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68 views

Modification of Latin adage

Is this a good alternate Latin translation of "Never give up, never surrender?":Numquam desiste, numquam dede!
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1answer
61 views

Grammatical modification of quote attributed to Appius Claudius Crassus Caecus (340-273 B.C)

Is this grammatically correct: "Quisque fortunae suae faber est"?
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1answer
60 views

Latin names for groups of animals

How should I go about naming groups of animals in Latin? Should I use a single word like grex in all situations, or should I use varying words depending on something? In English — and I simplify for ...
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29 views

How did people describe flags and banners using Latin?

This is my first time on the forum, so If there's any tips to get my question answered feel free to share. I have been working on a Minecraft resource pack that changes the Latin setting, hopefully ...
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1answer
58 views

What is the best word for "constellation"?

In a previous question about a Cicero quote, he uses the word sidera. Lewis & short give the definition of sidus as: a group of stars, constellation, heavenly body Astrum has a similar ...
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2answers
405 views

How to scan "nempe tenens, quod amo, gremioque in Iasonis haerens"

Ovid's Metamorphoses 7.66, here I marked my attempt: nempĕ tĕ/nens, quŏd ă/mo, grĕmĭ/oqu(e) in/ Iasŏnĭ/s haerens That makes the 3 first feet dactyls and the fourth one a spondee, but the ...
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1answer
115 views

Where can I read the introductions to the Latin Dictionaries

If you want to read Lewis' introduction to his own dictionary it's not easy to find out where this is, same with Gaffiot, same with Labaigue and Georges. (The Oxford Latin Dictionary is not available ...
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1answer
243 views

Meaning of the first line of Cicero's De Oratore

The very first line of Cicero's De Oratore reads as follows Cogitanti mihi saepenumero et memoria vetera repetenti perbeati fuisse, Quinte Frater, illi videri solent, qui in optima re publica, cum et ...
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1answer
65 views

How to you convert a Latin word, such as voluntas, into a name, specifically a surname?

I've been wondering how to properly convert Latin words into names to signify the importance of certain concepts to a person, and met conflicting information online. My default assumption would be to ...
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1answer
341 views

Why does Müller read "accusatius" in Satyrica 119.11?

Petronius' Satyrica 119.11-12, in Konrad Müller's Teubner edition (1995), reads: hinc Numidae †accusatius†, illinc nova vellera Seres, atque Arabum populus sua despoliaverat arva. What reasons could ...
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2answers
898 views

Ave for plural addressee?

I have been told that the greeting ave or have is of Punic origin and not an imperative of avere. If so, how do I use this word to greet several people? Is it in the same form, is it pluralized to (h)...
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4answers
315 views

What monolingual text editions are available?

I am a beginner and making quite good progress with Ovid. Rete utile est. To start with Ovid I bought the Loeb edition of Metamorphoses, Books 1 to 8. But I anticipate that when I have finished this ...
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1answer
329 views

Why is nominative instead of ablative absolute used in 'Ibi egressi Trojani'?

In LLPSI 2 'Roma Æterna', Chapter XLI 'Origines', it is written: Ibi [Siciliâ] egressi Trojani, quibus ab immenso prope errore nihil præter arma et naves supererat, cum prædam ex agris agerent, ...
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1answer
320 views

Is the word order of "Iura novit curia" used for emphasis?

Is the change in the word order used for emphasis, and how would we translate "iura novit curia" to English while maintaining the word order? We don't have cases and there is the danger of ...
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1answer
84 views

How to say "Things could always be worse"

For an ironic family crest, I would like to incorporate the motto "Things could always be worse" or a similar Latin saying.
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1answer
94 views

How this phrase could be written in classical latin?

How would the phrase "Vi veri vniversum vivvs vici" be written in Classical Latin? As far as I know, it is by Christopher Marlowe, originally written as Vi veri vniversum vivus vici, used in ...
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2answers
84 views

Does "Ob Eam Causam" introduce an indirect question

I apologize if there's an obvious answer here I'm missing, but I can't figure out why this line from De Bello Gallico 5.33 is subjunctive: "At Cotta, qui cogitasset haec posse in itinere accidere ...
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1answer
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How did the Romans congratulate a new father?

One of our users recently became a father and of course congratulations are in order. How did the Romans do that? More specifically, are there any attested congratulations to a new father in the ...
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1answer
632 views

What is the percentage of loan words in Classical Latin?

I want to know the percentages of loanwords in Classical Latin (maybe including Old Latin but NOT post-classical Latin), including native terms and words, for example: 90% Native 7% Greek 1% Etruscan ?...
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1answer
210 views

Tellus' "briny robes"

I read in Keats' Hyperion: [...] No, by Tellus and her briny robes! (Hyperion, 246) Tellus is a Latin goddess, her Greek counterpart being Gaia. I am looking for the Greek or Latin source of the ...
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4answers
563 views

"gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum")

So far I was thinking the way of saying "He spends time in writing letters" (example from A&G) might be terit tempus scribendo epistulas or terit tempus scribendis epistulis. But can ...
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1answer
414 views

The translation of "What would Caesar do?" in classical Latin

The translation of "What would Caesar do?" in classical Latin. I've researched a lot and I've not found any evidence of what this phrase would be in classical Latin. Any guest? I'm trying to ...
15
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1answer
830 views

Was avē truly pronounced with an "unspelled /h/"?

According to the etymology at Wiktionary, avē derived from a Punic word with an initial /h/, and was pronounced as such in the Classical period even though the word was spelt without. Is this claim, ...
3
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2answers
129 views

'lived in Greece' and 'returning home'

The original question is, 'The other, whose parents lived in Greece, was returning home.' My translation is, 'Alter, cuius parentes habitaverunt Graecum, redibat domum,' and i am not so sure if 'in ...
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1answer
138 views

How is "vinum rubrum" right?

Sorry, I am a beginner so I don't really know much. But doesn't the genetive singular of the word red should be rubri?
11
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1answer
945 views

Did the ancients or medievals have a word for the energy stored in plants?

If you spend a little time gardening, you soon become aware that plants store energy in their roots, which they collect from the Sun through their leaves. By the end of Autumn, perennials usually have ...
28
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1answer
7k views

Why did so many Romans name their children after ordinal numbers?

Why were so many praenomina ordinal numbers or apparently derived from ordinal numbers? A few examples: Octavia Minor (Augustus Caesar's older sister) Octavia Major (Augustus Caesar's older half-...
4
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1answer
252 views

What is the the etymology and origin of the word/name Calvus?

Doing research (the question was also asked here as well) I came across the name having a French origin meaning "bald". However, I also came across that the name has a connection to the ...
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1answer
69 views

How to say......" Focus and Persevere"..in classic latin

I am creating a motto on an emblem, and I want to use that phrase.....Focus and Perservere.....in Latin as my motto. Hence the need for the phrase in classic Latin.
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2answers
1k views

The best way to say Sinners

I'd like to create an aesthetic with the phrase "Remember that you must die, sinners" - targeted at the viewers. I know the first part is memento mori, but what is the best translation of &...
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0answers
127 views

On the alleged ambiguity of the Ablative Absolute "Mutatis mutandis"

According to the wikipedia entry of Mutatis mutandis, "Mutatis mutandis is a Medieval Latin phrase meaning 'with things changed that should be changed' or 'having changed what needs to be changed'...
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2answers
203 views

Participal plunder: How should ‘animum concentū’ and ‘ex aequō dēmulcēns’ be interpreted?

I am assisting someone working on Bonifaccio’s work on dance, and the following quote from Lucian (The Dance) came up, here with my translation attempt (only on the Latin part) and notes to the same: ...
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1answer
342 views

'His studies' in Latin

The full sentence is 'Quintus no longer enjoyed his studies,' and I've translated it as 'Quintus non longior gaudebat studiorum.' Should 'studiorum' be genitive since it expresses possession?
2
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1answer
50 views

Ubi jus ibi remedium

I am trying to make sense of the phrase ubi jus ibi remedium. It seems incomplete, and I feel I should add two verbs and something to separate the two sentences, for example: Ubi jus est, ibi est ...
5
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1answer
309 views

'i have never made' in latin

I've tried to search for this phrase, but I haven't found an answer. I looked it up on google translate and it says 'nunquam fecit.' I don't think it's correct.
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0answers
150 views

When did "si" become the standard word for "yes" in the Italian peninsula?

I am aware that classical Latin did not have words for "yes" and "no" in the same sense that English does. I know that they could express the idea of "yes" by either ...

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