Questions tagged [classical-latin]

Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

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5
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0answers
61 views

When did “si” become the standard word for “yes” in the Italian peninsula?

I am aware that classical Latin did not have words for "yes" and "no" in the same sense that English does. I know that they could express the idea of "yes" by either ...
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172 views

How to learn Latin without resources in mother language

My native language is Persian. There's no good and comprehensive book in Persian for learning Latin and Ancient Greek. There is no tradition for teaching these classical languages in Iran. Also in the ...
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628 views

Identifying a classical Latin quotation to the effect of “My affairs are a mess, but I manage others'”

I recall a Latin quotation I encountered some years ago, ex memoria in John Gray's Lawyer's Latin, but I don't have the book to hand and can't find the source of it. It was something to the effect ...
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197 views

Changing tones (?) in Classical Latin

When I heard Classical Latin for the first time on Horatii carmina quae voce canora Thomas Nudipes pronuntiat, I was surprised to hear what I will describe as changing tones! The reason why I was ...
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194 views

Two levels of 'and'

What I am looking for is best illustrate by an example, so please excuse the detour. In Finnish there are two words for "and": "ja" and "sekä". When used together, "...
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85 views

The Role of “quem” in a Translation of Cicero

Cicero "de Oratione" (2.86.351): "iam istuc quantum tibi ego reliquerim, inquit Antonius, erit in tua potestate. Si enim vere agere volueris, omnia tibi relinquo; sin dissimulare, tu ...
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1answer
82 views

Is there a dictionary for pronunciation explanations?

All dictionaries I have seen that state vowel quantities simply state them but do not explain how the quantity of each vowel was determined. The same goes for the distinctions between vocalic and ...
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113 views

Is “Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end” correctly attributed to Seneca (the younger)?

The quote is a fairly well know lyric in the 1998 song Closing Time by Semisonic. In the Wikipedia entry for the song, it claims "The song ends with a quote attributed to Roman Stoic philosopher ...
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1answer
240 views

Constituendi autem sunt qui sint in amicitia fines et quasi termini diligendi (Cic. Amic. 56)

I was wondering to what extent the agreement pattern exemplified with the following sentences drawn from Cicero's De Amicitia can be regarded as the most natural one. I'm asking this question since, ...
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281 views

How should “porta itineri longissima” be interpreted?

According to a comment by @SebastianKoppehel, the interpretation of porta itineri as "the gate to the journey" seems questionable. Wiktionary, for example, has the following translation: ...
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Was the letter phi used in Latin?

Is there any evidence of the Greek letter phi being borrowed to write Latin words of Greek origin as φilosoφia for example? The question is not restricted to Classical Latin.
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86 views

Legendum excolit mundum

I am trying to translate "Reading improves the world" to Latin. My translation is: Legendum excolit mundum. Is this a good translation? I can't understand if I should use legendum or ...
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332 views

Grammatical structure of “Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit”

@Mitomino points out in this comment that my understanding of what modifies what in the sentence shown below from De Bello Gallico (VI.4.3) is mistaken. I'll diagram my understanding below. Can you ...
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1answer
39 views

What is the difference between passive and past participle?

Is there a semantic difference between a past participle followed by esse and a passive verb? Example. Roma destructa est. / Roma destruitur.
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68 views

Ut syllabās gravēs verbōrum didicimus?

Hanc rēgulam didicī dē verbīs: Sī syllaba paenultima brevis est, syllaba antepaenultima gravis fit. Sī autem longa est, ipsa gravis fit. Ut hanc rēgulam didicimus? Ex grammaticīs? Quō tempore haec ...
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117 views

Latin translation of “hope for the best, prepare for the worst”

I'm looking in translating this text (in classical Latin rather than contemporary): Hope for the best Prepare for the worst Expect the unexpected (or alternatively "Plan for the worst") ...
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1answer
41 views

Does Latin only require on “mea”/“my” when English Requires two?

I just heard the motto "Patria gloria mea" in a movie. It was translated as "my country, my honor". MY questions: Does Latin only require one "mea"/"my" when ...
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What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness?

What are some ancient words that mean forgiveness? I’m looking for words that were used before the common era (before 0 CE). I’m looking for words from Latin, Greek, German, and other languages. These ...
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1answer
784 views

“With all due respect” in Latin

Several sites, including the notorious Google Translate, have Salva pace to mean "with all due respect". However I could not confirm this from classical sources, yet we can find several ...
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74 views

What is the right way to translate ''I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul'' in latin?

I have been looking now for a while the right translation of these sentences in latin; I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul. I have found three different answers but not sure which ...
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1answer
66 views

Meaning of “quod” in this context

M. Valerius Martialis: Epigrammata III.44 recites Occurrit tibi nemo quod libenter, quod, quacumque venis, fuga est et ingens circa te, Ligurine, solitudo, quid sit, scire cupis? What is the ...
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119 views

How to decline Greek proper nouns ending in -ēs in Latin?

I was browsing the OLD today and then I noticed the following entry: Stagīrītēs, Stagē- ~-ae m. A person who originates from Stagira in Macedonia. Two examples are given there: Aristotelem ~em Cic. Ac....
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Determining the difference between ambiguous nouns and verb forms without macrons

Salvete omnes, As I've mentioned a couple times on here, I am working on adding macrons to a specific text, I can't really use an auto-macronizer (nor will I, or do I want to). But there is a bit of a ...
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108 views

edere panem vs. comedere panem

Consider the following minimal pair: edere panem 'to eat (the) bread' comedere panem 'to eat up the bread' When a resultative prefix is present (e.g. com- in comedere), panem is necessarily understood ...
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722 views

J in ancients inscriptions

Is the letter J used in ancient Roman inscriptions of (roughly) the classical era? If yes, in what kinds of contexts? I am under the impression that using I for vowels and J for consonants is a ...
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76 views

New Life - Latin translation

I’m looking for farm name ideas and am stuck on the concept of it being a “new life”... celebrating a changing of life’s season, etc. All I can find really is the general translation, I’m not sure how ...
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24 views

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Bk II, first para., “conplexus”

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Book II, paragraph I: Mundum et hoc—quocumque nomine alio caelum appellare libuit cuius circumflexu teguntur cuncta, numen esse credi par est, aeternum, inmensum, neque ...
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94 views

Is “Laudatio omnibus Dei” grammatically correct, or simply inane?

Is "Laudatio omnibus Dei" grammatically correct?
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254 views

Finding the original Latin text of Seneca (“No tree becomes rooted and sturdy unless many a wind assails it.”)

In what text of Seneca will I find the Latin for the statement, one English translation of which is, "No tree becomes rooted and sturdy unless many a wind assails it."
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64 views

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?
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Is there a dictionary that actually shows the verb patterns?

Is there a Latin dictionary that actually show the verb patterns? Patterns like Adiuvare + accusative somebody Ire + dative location Otherwise I only see the examples and it is not possible to ...
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1answer
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Abbreviations used by Romans in their inscriptions

While watching a documentary, I came across this Roman tombstone of three Jewish freedmen (below is the image): The expanded transcription available online is, L(ucius) Valerius L(uci) l(ibertus) ...
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36 views

Is this the correct metric to Virgils Georgics II, 459?

agrícó/las quíbús /ipsá pró/cul dis/cordíbús/ armis Is this correct? I tried to indicate the short syllables with the accents. I would appreciate your answer very much!
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On the syntax of some datives in a beautiful Ciceronian structure

I was wondering if you would like to share your thoughts on the grammar of the datives in the following texts from Cicero. The second example is a very interesting one provided by Kingshorsey in an ...
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91 views

ad obsidionem urbis vs. ad obsidendam urbem

I was wondering to what extent the two Prepositional Phrases (PPs) in the title of the present question can be taken as functionally equivalent. Consider the following text about Caesar's siege of ...
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440 views

Translating “cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides”

I’m having trouble understanding the following construction: cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides It is taken from a German manuscript by Dietericus mentioning that the human body should be like a ...
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1answer
75 views

Online classes for learning Classical Latin

Does anyone have any recommendations on online video classes for learning Classical Latin? I have bought courses on Udemy.com, for example, for web development and saw that there are a few different ...
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1answer
159 views

What was the latin command to plunder?

After the Gallic Wars, there existed a commanders order to plunder the cities of the vanquished. What was that Latin command?
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Why does Catullus use “odi” instead of “odio” in Catullus 85?

I think the question is straightforward, "odi" to me appears to be the imperative while "amo" is the singular 1st p. Is this some construction I am unaware of with "et"?
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1answer
87 views

What are the meaning of these sentences? Christiani victores obsessi

I am trying to translate the chapter titles of four chapters in a medieval source, Caffaro's De Liberatione Civitatum Orientis. Here is the full table of contents: Here are the four chapters I wish ...
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What was the use and frequency of use of Latin “mactāre”?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
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575 views

Vowel shortening before another vowel: Exceptions

I am rather ashamed to admit that I used to pronounce Alexandrea (or Alexandria, cf. Ἀλεξάνδρεια) incorrectly in Latin, that is I mistakenly applied the famous rule "vocalis ante vocalem ...
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1answer
273 views

When you finish “lingua latina per se illustrata” can you understand latin books easily?

As It is said in title, when you finish "lingua latina per se illustrata" by Hans H. Ørberg How much can you understand a latin manuscript? Or should one follow some other books after it?
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105 views

If we say worship is only for God which latin word should we use for worship?

Latria is defined as that worship which is due only to God, unlike other forms of veneration (such as to the Virgin Mary or Saints) which is called Dulia and Hyperdulia. All three, I think, are forms ...
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167 views

A noun meaning “survivor”

I am looking for a noun meaning "survivor". It looks like the closest in meaning is the adjective superstes. Can that be used as a noun, and if so how do you decline it? Per the post on ...
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134 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...
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1answer
278 views

Do neuter plural nouns ever take singular verbs in Latin?

In Greek, it's well-known that neuter plural subjects take singular verb forms. This seems to be an old Indo-European feature, as it shows up in e.g. Anatolian languages as well. Does this feature ...
3
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1answer
178 views

Agreement and possessive genitive

What we do in the following example? I need to combine two words in a phrase: 'professional' and 'holiday'. There is no adjective 'professional' in Latin or my searching is bad. So I can use the ...
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2answers
135 views

Translate “self-made” into both an adjective and a noun

I'm looking to translate the phrase "self-made" into an adjective and a noun. Unlike the English phrase where "made" doesn't mean you literally made yourself, in this case I want ...
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1answer
146 views

Which modern language is more similar to classical latin?

Since Spanish, Italian and French languages are all romance languages and which one of them is the most similar one to classical latin language? Is it Italian? (Rationally maybe?) EDIT1: I found this ...

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