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Questions tagged [classical-latin]

Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

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4
votes
1answer
63 views

Does Latin have any Portmanteau words?

English has many examples of portmanteau words (e.g. "motel" is a combination of "motor" and "hotel"). Does Latin have any such phenomena?
6
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2answers
255 views

Doubt on pronunciation of verbs (stressing)

I have recently heard somebody (quoting Virgil) saying "Timèo Danaos...". This sounds awkward to me, but I confess I have not studied Latin for ages. I remember that timeo is a verb like moneo, II ...
4
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1answer
68 views

Found eius but pēius in the same text: is it some kind of mistake?

While I was reading Lingua Latina per se Illustrata - Familia Romana, I noted something: the vocabulary list has ĕius but pēius, is that by accident? Also I noted meī as mēī in line 92 of chapter 25, ...
2
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1answer
39 views

Translation of “the past shall live” into Latin

I am translating the motto, "The Past Shall Live" into classical Latin. Currently, I have Praeteritum Vivet, which I think makes sense, but I'd appreciate the input of those more skilled than I.
1
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1answer
49 views

Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar - Could some one please help to translate this

Could someone please help to transtale "Elit Scelerisque Mauris Pellentesque Pulvinar" to English? Many thanks and best regards, Phuong
2
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0answers
37 views

How was the original Ovid Metamorphoses formatted/punctuated most likely?

What punctuation was used in Classical Latin? was very insightful, but it doesn't go into specifics. Wikipedia said we don't have any original sources of Ovid's Metamorphoses until the 9th or 10th ...
5
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0answers
72 views

How did the Romans salute the Republic?

Are there any known phrases that were used by Romans to celebrate or cheer for the Republic? Something like Ave Res Publica ? Or maybe they'd cheer for something else, like for the Senate or for the ...
3
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2answers
69 views

Translate “Crater Lake” into classical Latin

From what I have read of this post, Latin doesn't really use nouns as adjectives in the way that English does, although that post mentions you can use a noun in genitive case to achieve this. I am ...
6
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1answer
362 views

Translate “loyal animal” into classical Latin

I am translating the short phrase "loyal animal", or "faithful animal" into classical Latin. In this case, "animal" is intentionally very broad - I don't want to limit it to just domesticated animals ...
5
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1answer
122 views

How did the Romans refer to people of unknown gender?

Reference to other people's gender has become a delicate issue in today's world. I expect that the Romans had no controversy over it, but they must have encountered situations where they have to write ...
5
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1answer
81 views

Generic toast in classical Latin

Was there a generic toast that Romans would say to each other when drinking, along the lines of Cheers, or Sláinte. It doesn't need to have the meaning of those so much as have the same cultural usage:...
3
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2answers
46 views

Indirect questions and the passive subjunctive

How would you translate: "He asked if the the city had been captured?" Quaerit num civitatem captum esse? Here I am using an accusative (captum) plus infinitive (esse). Am I right? Thank you!
2
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1answer
111 views

Pronunciation of “Formulæ”

What is the pronunciation of Formulæ in Latin ? Is there any difference (in pronunciation) between classical and vulgar Latin ? The answer can be in International Phonetic Alphabet (IPA) format.
10
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1answer
2k views

Translate “Everything burns” into classical Latin

In a project of mine I have an event which was named "everything burns", or potentially "Everything burned" (I am open to both tenses). What would this be in classical Latin? I tentatively have this ...
4
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1answer
62 views

Translate “collective unconscious” into Latin

I would like to translate the phrase "collective unconscious" coined by Carl Jung, into classical Latin. It does not need to be a literal translation as long as it conveys the same concept of a shared ...
7
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1answer
406 views

Diminutive -ula

I didn't find -ula among the diminutive endings discussed on this site in the question "Constructing Latin diminutives." Hadrian's famous poem "Animula vagula, blandula" uses these 3 diminutives plus "...
2
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1answer
43 views

reus et debitor

I run into this sentence of the Digest - D.9.2.54 Legis Aquiliae debitori competit actio, cum reus stipulandi ante moram promissum animal vulneraverit. I understand that the person who has ...
0
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1answer
39 views

Explanatory and Etymological dictionary of the Latin Language

With the term explanatory I am translating ερμηνευτικό. A dictionary which defines words comprehensively and clearly. If one considers Oxford University to be the authority on the English language ...
2
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2answers
70 views

Essentialia negotii transaction's essentials

So essentialia negotii is transaction's essentials. How would one say The transaction's essential things, transactions' essential things, essential things of the transaction and essential things of ...
2
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2answers
498 views

Is the adjective in latin put after the noun or before?

E.g Is the legal term essentialia negotii correct use of the grammar(declension, agreement, word order) rules or not? Should it not be negotiorum essentialium so that the case, the number and the ...
4
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2answers
106 views

Is the locative used with multi-part city names?

The Duolingo Latin course mentions New York a lot. (I'd rather have it focused on the geography of ancient Italy than the modern US, but that's beside the point now.) The locative comes up regularly: ...
2
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2answers
105 views

What is a “robot” in Latin?

I read in Wikipedia the word robotum and robotor. Also, there is automaton, and androides. I don't see such a word in the [short online version of the] Lexicon Recentis Latinatis by the Vatican (which ...
5
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1answer
110 views

What is “heart” as the emotional organ?

In English one uses the word "heart" in a variety of ways to express deep emotion, as in "She will always be in our hearts". Is there a corresponding "emotional organ" in Latin? How should I go about ...
4
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1answer
64 views

Do Latin novellas exist to help develop vocabulary for reading Vergil's Aeneid?

I'm taking a 4th semester Latin class in which we are jumping right into Vergil's Aeneid, said to be quite difficult. We were discussing the relatively recent phenomenon of 'novellas' being written in ...
4
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0answers
50 views

Any material on so-called “inverse analysis” and “minimal pairs” to practice Latin grammar?

I was wondering if anyone could provide me with references on any online material (pdf, links, etc.) of Latin Grammar which can contain exercises based on so-called "inverse analysis" and "minimal ...
8
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2answers
154 views

When did “virgo” gain its sexual meaning?

The primary meaning I associate with virgo, virginis is "young woman", perhaps a bit older than a puella but not yet a mulier. However, the descendants of this word (in English and the Romance ...
3
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2answers
100 views

Did the Romans ever use 'decimatio' in a generalized sense?

Decimātiō was a Roman term for a military punishment where a group was reduced by a tenth. But in modern English, decimation is used generically to mean 'greatly reduced or damaged', often in ...
2
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1answer
48 views

Which word best translates spark as in a spark of energy?

Any latin, my tags aren't a mistake. The more variations the better thanks
3
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1answer
69 views

Latin expression for “carrying something on one's back”

In Spanish, the word cuesta is nowadays used as slope. Nonetheless, the etymology of the word indicates that it comes fom Latin costa, ae meaning "a side" but also "a rib". In fact, an old meaning for ...
5
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3answers
161 views

How was “gnosco” pronounced?

I've heard it said before that Classical Latin /gn/ between vowels (as in magnus) was probably realized as [ŋn] (as in "hangnail"). This is supported by Romance descendants and the spelling of certain ...
5
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1answer
115 views

Is it better to memorize verb's 1st person perfect tense?

Is it necessary to memorize verb's perfect form like paro, parare, paravi? Or can I predict a verb's perfect forms if I remember the rules by which perfect stems are formed. Like, the suffix -v/iv or ...
2
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1answer
73 views

What is “password” in classical Latin?

The concept of passwords predates computers: To gain access to, say, some heavily guarded premises, one may need to be able to say a secret phrase to the guards. I would imagine this concept was not ...
18
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3answers
3k views

Historicity doubted by Romans

The Roman historians seem happy to mix history with myth with no discussion on the reliability of one's sources — or even a mention of the sources in the first place. I would like to imagine ...
3
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2answers
85 views

Can “ave, vire” be used colloquially as “hey, bro”?

There's a Spanish webcomic called ¡Eh, tío!, an expression that can be translated into English as hey, man or maybe as hey, bro. The webcomic had some time ago a story arc set in an alternate universe ...
8
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0answers
334 views

How would Marcus Aurelius have pronounced his Latin?

It is my understanding that Julius Caesar, Cicero, Octavian (Augustus) would have pronounced Latin in a manner that is decidedly Classical, characterised by: "v" as /w/ "c" and "g" always hard (i.e., ...
6
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1answer
114 views

When did the classical period of Latin end?

When did the classical period of Latin end? I found that it is different in various books. Wikipedia: 75 BC–AD 3rd century Oxford Latin Dictionary: ? BC–AD 200 Lewis and Short: unknown Allen and ...
3
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2answers
114 views

How did the Romans call the days of the week?

As a prequel to this other question, as suggested by Joonas Ilmavirta I would like to know how did the Romans call the days of the week (if they had names at all) in the different systems they had. ...
3
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0answers
53 views

Did the Romans abbreviate the days of the week?

In current Spanish when we have to abbreviate the days of the week using only one character, in most places (but not everywhere) to tell apart martes (Tuesday) from miércoles (Wednesday) we use 'M' ...
1
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2answers
61 views

“ferro se petentem”

Valete, I have this sentence (written by Ulpianus in Digest 9.2.5) : Sed et si quemcumque alium ferro se petentem quis occiderit But if someone (quis) killed anyone else (quemcumque alium) when ...
8
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1answer
324 views

Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum – Lucretius

I saw this quote in someone's forum sig file (signature): "Tantum religio potuit suadere malorum." - Lucretius Curious, I consulted Google Translate, which my professional translator brother cautions ...
2
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1answer
67 views

Branches of Roman military in Latin

The military force of a country is often divided in branches such as an army, a navy, and an air force. There are many other branches out there, but the point is that I am looking for a division of ...
4
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1answer
41 views

Understanding a sacrifice in Horace's carmen 1.5

In Carmina 1, poem 5, Horace writes about an untrustworthy and seducing lady. He ends the poem in: (...) Me tabula sacer votiva paries indicat uvida suspendisse potenti vestimenta maris deo. ...
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0answers
51 views

I need help translating two sentences into Latin [closed]

Phrase 1 : Life is in the doing. Phrase 2 : The wood belongs to the families who have their roots in it.
2
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0answers
62 views

Are there specific exceptions to the rule of lengthening a vowel before “ns” or “nf”?

A while ago, I wrote an answer summarizing my understanding of the rule that a vowel is long in Classical Latin before ns or nf. As far as I know, this rule applied very regularly. But I'm not sure ...
4
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1answer
38 views

Grammatical analysis of comparative parts (i.e. “tam … quam”, etc.)

I have the following sentence from Seneca, epistula 1, §2: "Cum placuerit fieri, toto illum pectore admitte; tam audaciter cum illo loquere quam tecum." However, I'm not sure what the "tam audaciter ...
1
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1answer
63 views

looking for a pair of texts in a Greek/Latin comedy

I'm looking for any pair of texts (Ancient Greek, Latin), meeting the following criteria: Both texts may be very brief. The Latin text should be a translation very close to the Greek text. The Greek ...
3
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3answers
72 views

Keep on dreaming

My niece is turning 18 and I want to get her a bracelet with something in Latin engraved. Im looking for something in the lines of "keep on dreaming". Can anyone help?
5
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2answers
339 views

Longest Text in Latin

What are the longest texts, say top 5, transmitted via manuscript from the Classical/Early Medieval period?
3
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3answers
243 views

“Fīliolō me auctum scito, salva Terentia”; what is “me” role in this phrase?

Is "Fīliolō me" the ablative of the phrase or "me" refers to "me auctum" in the accusative? If is in the ablative, how does it translates?
2
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1answer
61 views

Latin original for “Would you have a great empire?” saying, by Publilius Syrus

Can someone provide the original Latin translation for Publilius Syrus's famous axiom, "Would you have a great empire? Rule over yourself." I have searched online and not been able to find it in Latin....