Questions tagged [classical-latin]

Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

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1answer
52 views

Latin names for groups of animals

How should I go about naming groups of animals in Latin? Should I use a single word like grex in all situations, or should I use varying words depending on something? In English — and I simplify for ...
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0answers
27 views

How did people describe flags and banners using Latin?

This is my first time on the forum, so If there's any tips to get my question answered feel free to share. I have been working on a Minecraft resource pack that changes the Latin setting, hopefully ...
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1answer
55 views

What is the best word for “constellation”?

In a previous question about a Cicero quote, he uses the word sidera. Lewis & short give the definition of sidus as: a group of stars, constellation, heavenly body Astrum has a similar ...
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2answers
401 views

How to scan “nempe tenens, quod amo, gremioque in Iasonis haerens”

Ovid's Metamorphoses 7.66, here I marked my attempt: nempĕ tĕ/nens, quŏd ă/mo, grĕmĭ/oqu(e) in/ Iasŏnĭ/s haerens That makes the 3 first feet dactyls and the fourth one a spondee, but the ...
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1answer
109 views

Where can I read the introductions to the Latin Dictionaries

If you want to read Lewis' introduction to his own dictionary it's not easy to find out where this is, same with Gaffiot, same with Labaigue and Georges. (The Oxford Latin Dictionary is not available ...
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238 views

Meaning of the first line of Cicero's De Oratore

The very first line of Cicero's De Oratore reads as follows Cogitanti mihi saepenumero et memoria vetera repetenti perbeati fuisse, Quinte Frater, illi videri solent, qui in optima re publica, cum et ...
3
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1answer
64 views

How to you convert a Latin word, such as voluntas, into a name, specifically a surname?

I've been wondering how to properly convert Latin words into names to signify the importance of certain concepts to a person, and met conflicting information online. My default assumption would be to ...
8
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335 views

Why does Müller read “accusatius” in Satyrica 119.11?

Petronius' Satyrica 119.11-12, in Konrad Müller's Teubner edition (1995), reads: hinc Numidae †accusatius†, illinc nova vellera Seres, atque Arabum populus sua despoliaverat arva. What reasons could ...
8
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2answers
878 views

Ave for plural addressee?

I have been told that the greeting ave or have is of Punic origin and not an imperative of avere. If so, how do I use this word to greet several people? Is it in the same form, is it pluralized to (h)...
6
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4answers
294 views

What monolingual text editions are available?

I am a beginner and making quite good progress with Ovid. Rete utile est. To start with Ovid I bought the Loeb edition of Metamorphoses, Books 1 to 8. But I anticipate that when I have finished this ...
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315 views

Why is nominative instead of ablative absolute used in 'Ibi egressi Trojani'?

In LLPSI 2 'Roma Æterna', Chapter XLI 'Origines', it is written: Ibi [Siciliâ] egressi Trojani, quibus ab immenso prope errore nihil præter arma et naves supererat, cum prædam ex agris agerent, ...
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314 views

Is the word order of “Iura novit curia” used for emphasis?

Is the change in the word order used for emphasis, and how would we translate "iura novit curia" to English while maintaining the word order? We don't have cases and there is the danger of ...
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77 views

How to say “Things could always be worse”

For an ironic family crest, I would like to incorporate the motto "Things could always be worse" or a similar Latin saying.
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90 views

How this phrase could be written in classical latin?

How would the phrase "Vi veri vniversum vivvs vici" be written in Classical Latin? As far as I know, it is by Christopher Marlowe, originally written as Vi veri vniversum vivus vici, used in ...
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82 views

Does “Ob Eam Causam” introduce an indirect question

I apologize if there's an obvious answer here I'm missing, but I can't figure out why this line from De Bello Gallico 5.33 is subjunctive: "At Cotta, qui cogitasset haec posse in itinere accidere ...
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How did the Romans congratulate a new father?

One of our users recently became a father and of course congratulations are in order. How did the Romans do that? More specifically, are there any attested congratulations to a new father in the ...
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1answer
621 views

What is the percentage of loan words in Classical Latin?

I want to know the percentages of loanwords in Classical Latin (maybe including Old Latin but NOT post-classical Latin), including native terms and words, for example: 90% Native 7% Greek 1% Etruscan ?...
7
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209 views

Tellus' “briny robes”

I read in Keats' Hyperion: [...] No, by Tellus and her briny robes! (Hyperion, 246) Tellus is a Latin goddess, her Greek counterpart being Gaia. I am looking for the Greek or Latin source of the ...
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4answers
553 views

“gerund + genitive” vs “gerund+accusative” (“scribendo epistulas” vs “scribendo epistularum”)

So far I was thinking the way of saying "He spends time in writing letters" (example from A&G) might be terit tempus scribendo epistulas or terit tempus scribendis epistulis. But can ...
7
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1answer
409 views

The translation of “What would Caesar do?” in classical Latin

The translation of "What would Caesar do?" in classical Latin. I've researched a lot and I've not found any evidence of what this phrase would be in classical Latin. Any guest? I'm trying to ...
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813 views

Was avē truly pronounced with an “unspelled /h/”?

According to the etymology at Wiktionary, avē derived from a Punic word with an initial /h/, and was pronounced as such in the Classical period even though the word was spelt without. Is this claim, ...
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2answers
128 views

'lived in Greece' and 'returning home'

The original question is, 'The other, whose parents lived in Greece, was returning home.' My translation is, 'Alter, cuius parentes habitaverunt Graecum, redibat domum,' and i am not so sure if 'in ...
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1answer
128 views

How is “vinum rubrum” right?

Sorry, I am a beginner so I don't really know much. But doesn't the genetive singular of the word red should be rubri?
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934 views

Did the ancients or medievals have a word for the energy stored in plants?

If you spend a little time gardening, you soon become aware that plants store energy in their roots, which they collect from the Sun through their leaves. By the end of Autumn, perennials usually have ...
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1answer
7k views

Why did so many Romans name their children after ordinal numbers?

Why were so many praenomina ordinal numbers or apparently derived from ordinal numbers? A few examples: Octavia Minor (Augustus Caesar's older sister) Octavia Major (Augustus Caesar's older half-...
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1answer
249 views

What is the the etymology and origin of the word/name Calvus?

Doing research (the question was also asked here as well) I came across the name having a French origin meaning "bald". However, I also came across that the name has a connection to the ...
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1answer
65 views

How to say…“ Focus and Persevere”..in classic latin

I am creating a motto on an emblem, and I want to use that phrase.....Focus and Perservere.....in Latin as my motto. Hence the need for the phrase in classic Latin.
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2answers
1k views

The best way to say Sinners

I'd like to create an aesthetic with the phrase "Remember that you must die, sinners" - targeted at the viewers. I know the first part is memento mori, but what is the best translation of &...
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122 views

On the alleged ambiguity of the Ablative Absolute “Mutatis mutandis”

According to the wikipedia entry of Mutatis mutandis, "Mutatis mutandis is a Medieval Latin phrase meaning 'with things changed that should be changed' or 'having changed what needs to be changed'...
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2answers
202 views

Participal plunder: How should ‘animum concentū’ and ‘ex aequō dēmulcēns’ be interpreted?

I am assisting someone working on Bonifaccio’s work on dance, and the following quote from Lucian (The Dance) came up, here with my translation attempt (only on the Latin part) and notes to the same: ...
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336 views

'His studies' in Latin

The full sentence is 'Quintus no longer enjoyed his studies,' and I've translated it as 'Quintus non longior gaudebat studiorum.' Should 'studiorum' be genitive since it expresses possession?
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48 views

Ubi jus ibi remedium

I am trying to make sense of the phrase ubi jus ibi remedium. It seems incomplete, and I feel I should add two verbs and something to separate the two sentences, for example: Ubi jus est, ibi est ...
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308 views

'i have never made' in latin

I've tried to search for this phrase, but I haven't found an answer. I looked it up on google translate and it says 'nunquam fecit.' I don't think it's correct.
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145 views

When did “si” become the standard word for “yes” in the Italian peninsula?

I am aware that classical Latin did not have words for "yes" and "no" in the same sense that English does. I know that they could express the idea of "yes" by either ...
6
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1answer
194 views

How to learn Latin without resources in mother language

My native language is Persian. There's no good and comprehensive book in Persian for learning Latin and Ancient Greek. There is no tradition for teaching these classical languages in Iran. Also in the ...
6
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1answer
639 views

Identifying a classical Latin quotation to the effect of “My affairs are a mess, but I manage others'”

I recall a Latin quotation I encountered some years ago, ex memoria in John Gray's Lawyer's Latin, but I don't have the book to hand and can't find the source of it. It was something to the effect ...
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1answer
211 views

Changing tones (?) in Classical Latin

When I heard Classical Latin for the first time on Horatii carmina quae voce canora Thomas Nudipes pronuntiat, I was surprised to hear what I will describe as changing tones! The reason why I was ...
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1answer
204 views

Two levels of 'and'

What I am looking for is best illustrate by an example, so please excuse the detour. In Finnish there are two words for "and": "ja" and "sekä". When used together, "...
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1answer
93 views

The Role of “quem” in a Translation of Cicero

Cicero "de Oratione" (2.86.351): "iam istuc quantum tibi ego reliquerim, inquit Antonius, erit in tua potestate. Si enim vere agere volueris, omnia tibi relinquo; sin dissimulare, tu ...
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1answer
102 views

Is there a dictionary for pronunciation explanations?

All dictionaries I have seen that state vowel quantities simply state them but do not explain how the quantity of each vowel was determined. The same goes for the distinctions between vocalic and ...
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475 views

Is “Every new beginning comes from some other beginning's end” correctly attributed to Seneca (the younger)?

The quote is a fairly well know lyric in the 1998 song Closing Time by Semisonic. In the Wikipedia entry for the song, it claims "The song ends with a quote attributed to Roman Stoic philosopher ...
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1answer
251 views

Constituendi autem sunt qui sint in amicitia fines et quasi termini diligendi (Cic. Amic. 56)

I was wondering to what extent the agreement pattern exemplified with the following sentences drawn from Cicero's De Amicitia can be regarded as the most natural one. I'm asking this question since, ...
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2answers
300 views

How should “porta itineri longissima” be interpreted?

According to a comment by @SebastianKoppehel, the interpretation of porta itineri as "the gate to the journey" seems questionable. Wiktionary, for example, has the following translation: ...
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81 views

Was the letter phi used in Latin?

Is there any evidence of the Greek letter phi being borrowed to write Latin words of Greek origin as φilosoφia for example? The question is not restricted to Classical Latin.
3
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90 views

Legendum excolit mundum

I am trying to translate "Reading improves the world" to Latin. My translation is: Legendum excolit mundum. Is this a good translation? I can't understand if I should use legendum or ...
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3answers
356 views

Grammatical structure of “Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit”

@Mitomino points out in this comment that my understanding of what modifies what in the sentence shown below from De Bello Gallico (VI.4.3) is mistaken. I'll diagram my understanding below. Can you ...
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1answer
44 views

What is the difference between passive and past participle?

Is there a semantic difference between a past participle followed by esse and a passive verb? Example. Roma destructa est. / Roma destruitur.
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74 views

Ut syllabās gravēs verbōrum didicimus?

Hanc rēgulam didicī dē verbīs: Sī syllaba paenultima brevis est, syllaba antepaenultima gravis fit. Sī autem longa est, ipsa gravis fit. Ut hanc rēgulam didicimus? Ex grammaticīs? Quō tempore haec ...
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2answers
420 views

Latin translation of “hope for the best, prepare for the worst”

I'm looking in translating this text (in classical Latin rather than contemporary): Hope for the best Prepare for the worst Expect the unexpected (or alternatively "Plan for the worst") ...
3
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1answer
43 views

Does Latin only require on “mea”/“my” when English Requires two?

I just heard the motto "Patria gloria mea" in a movie. It was translated as "my country, my honor". MY questions: Does Latin only require one "mea"/"my" when ...

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