Questions tagged [classical-latin]

Questions concerning Latin of the classical era, approximately 75 BCE to 300 CE

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2
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0answers
43 views

Determining the difference between ambiguous nouns and verb forms without macrons

Salvete omnes, As I've mentioned a couple times on here, I am working on adding macrons to a specific text, I can't really use an auto-macronizer (nor will I, or do I want to). But there is a bit of a ...
7
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0answers
55 views

edere panem vs. comedere panem

Consider the following minimal pair: edere panem 'to eat (the) bread' comedere panem 'to eat up the bread' When a resultative prefix is present (e.g. com- in comedere), panem is necessarily understood ...
7
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2answers
697 views

J in ancients inscriptions

Is the letter J used in ancient Roman inscriptions of (roughly) the classical era? If yes, in what kinds of contexts? I am under the impression that using I for vowels and J for consonants is a ...
1
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2answers
65 views

New Life - Latin translation

I’m looking for farm name ideas and am stuck on the concept of it being a “new life”... celebrating a changing of life’s season, etc. All I can find really is the general translation, I’m not sure how ...
1
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1answer
23 views

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Bk II, first para., “conplexus”

Pliny, Naturalis Historia Book II, paragraph I: Mundum et hoc—quocumque nomine alio caelum appellare libuit cuius circumflexu teguntur cuncta, numen esse credi par est, aeternum, inmensum, neque ...
2
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1answer
90 views

Is “Laudatio omnibus Dei” grammatically correct, or simply inane?

Is "Laudatio omnibus Dei" grammatically correct?
6
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1answer
239 views

Finding the original Latin text of Seneca (“No tree becomes rooted and sturdy unless many a wind assails it.”)

In what text of Seneca will I find the Latin for the statement, one English translation of which is, "No tree becomes rooted and sturdy unless many a wind assails it."
1
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1answer
59 views

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?

I am looking for the Latin translation for 'these are the good times' As in enjoy right now and live in the moment. can anyone help?
5
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1answer
86 views

Is there a dictionary that actually shows the verb patterns?

Is there a Latin dictionary that actually show the verb patterns? Patterns like Adiuvare + accusative somebody Ire + dative location Otherwise I only see the examples and it is not possible to ...
15
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1answer
1k views

Abbreviations used by Romans in their inscriptions

While watching a documentary, I came across this Roman tombstone of three Jewish freedmen (below is the image): The expanded transcription available online is, L(ucius) Valerius L(uci) l(ibertus) ...
3
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1answer
36 views

Is this the correct metric to Virgils Georgics II, 459?

agrícó/las quíbús /ipsá pró/cul dis/cordíbús/ armis Is this correct? I tried to indicate the short syllables with the accents. I would appreciate your answer very much!
6
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112 views

On the syntax of some datives in a beautiful Ciceronian structure

I was wondering if you would like to share your thoughts on the grammar of the datives in the following texts from Cicero. The second example is a very interesting one provided by Kingshorsey in an ...
4
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0answers
87 views

ad obsidionem urbis vs. ad obsidendam urbem

I was wondering to what extent the two Prepositional Phrases (PPs) in the title of the present question can be taken as functionally equivalent. Consider the following text about Caesar's siege of ...
4
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1answer
436 views

Translating “cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides”

I’m having trouble understanding the following construction: cum chordis corda, cum fidibus fides It is taken from a German manuscript by Dietericus mentioning that the human body should be like a ...
3
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1answer
68 views

Online classes for learning Classical Latin

Does anyone have any recommendations on online video classes for learning Classical Latin? I have bought courses on Udemy.com, for example, for web development and saw that there are a few different ...
4
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1answer
158 views

What was the latin command to plunder?

After the Gallic Wars, there existed a commanders order to plunder the cities of the vanquished. What was that Latin command?
9
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2answers
976 views

Why does Catullus use “odi” instead of “odio” in Catullus 85?

I think the question is straightforward, "odi" to me appears to be the imperative while "amo" is the singular 1st p. Is this some construction I am unaware of with "et"?
3
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1answer
84 views

What are the meaning of these sentences? Christiani victores obsessi

I am trying to translate the chapter titles of four chapters in a medieval source, Caffaro's De Liberatione Civitatum Orientis. Here is the full table of contents: Here are the four chapters I wish ...
6
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67 views

What was the use and frequency of use of Latin “mactāre”?

In What are the key differences between the main Latin verbs meaning "to kill"? we saw a lot of verbs meaning "to kill" and the differences between them. The fun part of it is that ...
8
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3answers
558 views

Vowel shortening before another vowel: Exceptions

I am rather ashamed to admit that I used to pronounce Alexandrea (or Alexandria, cf. Ἀλεξάνδρεια) incorrectly in Latin, that is I mistakenly applied the famous rule "vocalis ante vocalem ...
3
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1answer
177 views

When you finish “lingua latina per se illustrata” can you understand latin books easily?

As It is said in title, when you finish "lingua latina per se illustrata" by Hans H. Ørberg How much can you understand a latin manuscript? Or should one follow some other books after it?
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69 views

If we say worship is only for God which latin word should we use for worship?

Latria is defined as that worship which is due only to God, unlike other forms of veneration (such as to the Virgin Mary or Saints) which is called Dulia and Hyperdulia. All three, I think, are forms ...
4
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2answers
90 views

A noun meaning “survivor”

I am looking for a noun meaning "survivor". It looks like the closest in meaning is the adjective superstes. Can that be used as a noun, and if so how do you decline it? Per the post on ...
3
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3answers
122 views

What case does 'plus' take?

I don't have any information about what case to use with 'plus' (or 'magis'). In dictionaries usually only prepositions take some case, and it is showed in parentheses. In my language, 'more' takes ...
6
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1answer
211 views

Do neuter plural nouns ever take singular verbs in Latin?

In Greek, it's well-known that neuter plural subjects take singular verb forms. This seems to be an old Indo-European feature, as it shows up in e.g. Anatolian languages as well. Does this feature ...
3
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1answer
168 views

Agreement and possessive genitive

What we do in the following example? I need to combine two words in a phrase: 'professional' and 'holiday'. There is no adjective 'professional' in Latin or my searching is bad. So I can use the ...
2
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2answers
114 views

Translate “self-made” into both an adjective and a noun

I'm looking to translate the phrase "self-made" into an adjective and a noun. Unlike the English phrase where "made" doesn't mean you literally made yourself, in this case I want ...
1
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1answer
108 views

Which modern language is more similar to classical latin?

Since Spanish, Italian and French languages are all romance languages and which one of them is the most similar one to classical latin language? Is it Italian? (Rationally maybe?) EDIT1: I found this ...
7
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0answers
72 views

Is there a pre-Christian Roman story of “coming to faith”?

Is there a story in the Roman literature of someone previously not believing in the traditional Roman gods or a specific deity within their pantheon but later, after a vision or another experience, ...
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0answers
34 views

Romans and Ancient Greek language [duplicate]

Is there evidence in the inscriptions, that Romans have realised, that Hellenic languages are very close to theirs own language!? It seems to be that the distinguish was applied to the Etruscan ...
2
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0answers
65 views

Latin diphthongs, vowel qualities

There is one existing question on the SE (search for 'ae pronunciation'), but there are nothing equal to my interests. My googling returned to me nothing too. So, maybe somebody here know: nowadays ...
5
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0answers
76 views

Well, well, well

How to say this expression in Latin!? Expressing surprise: Well, well, well! It is here (when smth lost and found)! Expressing sarcasm: Well, well, well... And what now!? Expressing begining: Well, ...
4
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2answers
541 views

What is the translation of “Cashless Society” into Classical Latin?

The world seems to be moving this way, so how would Romans in the classic era have translated the phrase "cashless society". I am ignoring the fact that they didn't use paper money for ...
2
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1answer
133 views

Res vs Obiectus

What is the difference in meaning between Res and Obiectus (is it merely a matter of Language evolution Classical vs Medieval)? As a meaning I am interested in that which (the thing that) is related ...
4
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2answers
366 views

Furtum est, secundum lege lata, contrectatio rei alienae fraudulenta

How to say this in proper, idiomatic, classical Latin? Theft is, according to existing law, laying hands on others' (foreign, strange, belonging to others) things fraudulently. Would one use the ...
5
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1answer
100 views

What did the Romans think about new technology?

Are there any attested texts where a Roman comments on some new technology? The modern world sees a constant flux of them, but technological advancement was slower in antiquity and I do not recall ...
3
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2answers
115 views

“Man to Man” in Latin?

I've been spending a lot of time on this one but not quite sure how you would preserve the idiomatic connotation of the phrase "man to man". I'm planning to use it in a sentence like "they were ...
7
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2answers
191 views

How does one know when adjectives and participles are used dominantly?

Adjectives and participles can be used dominantly: aethere summo - (not: the highest heaven, but:) the highest point of heaven mediis ... Achivis: the middle of the Greeks virgine caesa: the murder ...
6
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1answer
80 views

Mountains and Mountain Ranges: Names

I have been recently enjoying Mark Walker's delightful translation of Professor Tolkien's masterpiece, The Hobbit (Hobbitus Ille). I was especially charmed by Tolkien's maps, translated into Latin (...
7
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1answer
316 views

Semantic difference of ablative and accusative cases when following “in”

What is the semantic and conceptual difference of ablative and accusative cases when following in? Examples: In dubio pro reo & opinio iuris uniformis et in longo usu Dubio and longo are in ...
8
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4answers
374 views

How would one say “such as” or “like” as prepositions

For example, how would one translate the prepositions in the following phrases: "The man is like a dog" or "We go many places, such as the forum"? What case would "canis" and "forum" be, respectively? ...
5
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1answer
88 views

Proper use of “tenaciter servanda”

How would it be proper to characterise (adverbially or adjectivally) longus usus, opinio juris so as to mean a belief of law (belief of a legal requirement) in long use holding uninterrupted and ...
3
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3answers
137 views

Why is specifically “Latin America” called that when numerous other regions' languages are also based on the Latin language?

There's an entire major region, spanning the entire South America and parts of North America, called "Latin America". People there tend to speak Spanish and closely related languages. There's also the ...
1
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1answer
94 views

What was the classical era word for a bastard?

If a Roman wanted to call another Roman a "bastard", what word would they use? I am curious about both the literal and general usage of the word, so calling someone an illegitimate child and also just ...
2
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1answer
102 views

Translate “Before the Fire” and “After the Fire” into Classical Latin

I am translating the phrases "Before the Fire" and "After the Fire" into Classical Latin. These are used for dating in a fashion similar to how B.C.E./B.C. and C.E./A.D. are used for dates in the ...
9
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1answer
145 views

What word did the Romans use to describe a hot, dry, sandy desert?

Did the Romans during the classical era have a word for a dry, hot, desert? There is desertum, but that is more "wilderness" than explicitly desert in the sense we might think of today. ...
18
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2answers
2k views

Why do we learn the genitive singular of each Latin noun?

When Latin nouns are listed for memorisation they are listed with the nom. sg., the gen. sg. and their gender. E.g. agricola, agricolae, masculine. Why are each of these forms necessary for ...
4
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1answer
126 views

“Aliquid scribere” or “de aliquo scribere”

Scaliger once wrote Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat, by which he obviously meant that Manilius did not know what he was writing about. In English, there is a big difference between "writing ...
9
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2answers
462 views

Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat

When the formidable classicist A. E. Housman published his critical edition of Manilius' Astronomicon, he stated in his infamous preface, "When Scaliger says at v 39 Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat ...
2
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1answer
88 views

Livy Book 1 27.1 type of subjunctive, sequence of tenses

Invidia vulgi, quod tribus militibus fortuna publica commissa fuerit, vanum ingenium dictatoris corrupit. What kind of subjunctive is fuerit and why. What tense is corrupit — perfect with or ...

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