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Questions tagged [mathematics]

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6
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2answers
81 views

How were fractions written and pronounced?

In English, when we want to express parts of wholes and certain numbers of said parts, we use fractions consisting of a denominator indicating how many equal pieces an item has been broken or divided ...
4
votes
3answers
159 views

What is the Latin Homophonic Group?

Equivalent question: What Latin letters won't equal 1? From: the homophonic group: a mathematical diversion --> This is an exercise from Michael Artin's Algebra on, well, abstract algebra. In this ...
6
votes
2answers
80 views

Quōmodo rēctē “derivative of f(x)” dīcere?

I am currently struggling to figure out how to translate the following phrase: [...] derivative of f(x) [...] I had a couple of initial ideas, namely: dēductīva [fūnctiō] dē f(x) dēductīva ...
8
votes
3answers
240 views

A phrase of L. Euler on functions

I'm trying to understand the following sentence from Leonhard Euler's Institutionum calculi integralis Vol. III Chap. 2, bottom of p.40: Huiusmodi functiones arbitrarias, prouti hic feci, eiusmodi ...
3
votes
2answers
192 views

A few L. Euler phrases to translate

I have a few Latin sentences from very old mathematical works by Leonard Euler. There is no their translation in the net. I do have their rough interpretation but need more precise and careful one. ...
5
votes
1answer
56 views

How to translate “evaluate”?

In mathematics people say that Evaluate f at x What word in Latin means "evaluate"? The construction ex-valor-are -> evaloro, -are, -avi, -atum seems to be an analogue but I am not sure if this ...
5
votes
1answer
84 views

How to say “lower bound” and “upper bound”?

Lower bound, upper bound, infimum, supremum, minimum, and maximum are concepts in mathematics. I cannot find translations of them in Wikipedia and Latin dictionaries. Here are their translations in ...
3
votes
1answer
51 views

How to say by/on the basis of?

In mathematics, the following phrase is common: By Theorem 5.6, the function is differentiable. How do I say 'by' in Latin? I don't think 'ab' is appropriate to use here. One way is to put '...
3
votes
0answers
68 views

Dubious passage in Archimedes

I have been interested in finding and understanding the original Greek text for the following quote by Archimedes, which made it to Wikiquote: Those who claim to discover everything but produce no ...
3
votes
1answer
74 views

What is a digit?

Is there a good Latin word for a digit or figure? I might want to say that the sum of the digits of 43 is 7 or that an actor was paid a six-figure salary for a movie. It occurred to me that I don't ...
7
votes
0answers
44 views

What is the most helpful dictionary for post-medieval works of philosophy and mathematics?

I need Latin for my natural-language artificial intelligence research, and I've been at it for enough years that I can read Latin well, but need extensive practice with composition. Thus I have ...
8
votes
2answers
651 views

What is the correct Latin prefix for 'two-and-a-half-times'?

Question. What is the latin prefix for "2½ times" ? Remark. The question asks for the correct analogue of the prefix "sesqui-" which, of course, is the prefix for "1½ times".
8
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0answers
75 views

Where can I find standard translations of mathematics/physics terms in Latin?

Suppose I want to write a math paper in Latin. I need to translate terms such as "manifold", "holomorphic", "martingale", etc. The Latin Wikipedia only has a limited number of terms available and ...
8
votes
2answers
378 views

Latin phrase, modelled on “horror vacui”, for the fear of “equality”?

A usual latin phrase is horror vacui, which in English can be rendered as fear of emptiness. Question: what do you consider a correct Latin translation of the English fear of equality? The question ...
4
votes
0answers
74 views

Which one is better: “sunt aequivalentes” or “aequivalent”?

If I want to say that two things are equivalent in Latin, I can imagine two ways using essentially the same word: X et Y sunt aequivalentes. X et Y aequivalent. Googling for the first option (...
4
votes
1answer
116 views

Superscript/suffix “ti”

Gauss wrote in his Ph.D. dissertation: Si quis e. g. in art. 3, aliaque incognitarum tamquam cognita spectata, reliquas per hanc et coefficientes datos rationaliter exprimere tentat, facile ...
10
votes
2answers
203 views

The logical “then”

I am interested in translating the word "then" in logical statements like this: "If a number is prime, then it is squarefree." Or maybe better: "If x is even and x+y is odd, then y is odd." In common ...
14
votes
2answers
379 views

“If and only if”

In mathematical literature "if and only if" (sometimes abbreviated as "iff"1) is a relatively common phrase. Saying "A if and only if B" means that A and B are equivalent logical statements. This is ...
9
votes
2answers
203 views

Phrasing “it remains to”

The phrase "it remains to" is pretty common in mathematics. It can be used in other contexts as well, but let me restrict my question to the abstract realm for concreteness. For example, this would ...
5
votes
3answers
111 views

English adjective derived from Latin for “per equal amount of datapoints”

I'm not completely sure if this is the correct place to ask this, but let's try. Many thanks in advance. I would like to invent a term for an average per equal amount of (sorted) data. With that I ...
4
votes
1answer
70 views

When did plus and minus start to mean mathematical operations?

The Latin adverbs plus and minus mean "more" and "less". They are also neuter compatative adjectives. In all languages I know these two words are used for mathematical the operations of addition and ...
7
votes
1answer
68 views

Most relevant word for numerical “order”

What word in latin would be the best representation of the 'order' or 'cardinality' of a mathematical 'group' or 'set' respectively. I'm looking to translate "Finite Simple Group of Order 2[/Two]" ...
14
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2answers
275 views

How to read mathematics out loud?

Reading symbolic mathematical expressions out loud in any language is mainly folklore: everyone in the field knows how to do it but finding explicit written instructions is surprisingly hard. I have ...
7
votes
1answer
164 views

“With respect to” in mathematics

The expression "with respect to" is common in mathematics. Consider these example sentences: The derivative of x^2y with respect to y is x^2. Let us reflect the point A with respect to the line L and ...
13
votes
1answer
282 views

How was perpendicularity expressed in classical Latin?

In today's mathematics, two lines are said to be normal to each other if they are at a right angle (perpendicular) to each other. I want to know how this can be expressed in classical Latin. Closely ...
15
votes
2answers
1k views

Where to find ancient mathematics in Latin?

I am a professional mathematician and an avid Latinist, and I would like to be able to read and write mathematics in Latin. I prefer classical style, so I would like to read some ancient mathematical ...