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What are the differences between the words "QUASI", "HYPER", and "PSEUDO"?

As an opening our question, briefly consider the following three examples of mathematical terminology: Quasi-Sphere Hyper-Sphere Pseudo-Sphere What are the differences between the words "QUASI&...
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
15 votes
2 answers
1k views

Mathematical Latin Help

So, I'm a PhD student working on the history of algebraic number theory and algebraic geometry. To a great extent that involves me having to read copious amounts of text in German and French. Now I'd ...
StormyTeacup's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
65 views

Adverbial numeral for the "teen"s

I noticed this numeral while reading Regulus, the Latin version of the Little Prince. In the scene that the businessman shows his sum of stars, he says: Cinq cent un millions six cent vingt-deux ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
151 views

"I will tell you in Latin, for French is of no use here"

In a well-known letter, Blaise Pascal, a French mathematician and philosopher, wrote (p. 7) 'je vous diray en Latin, car le Français n'y vaut rien' (I will tell you in Latin, for French is of no use ...
user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
136 views

How do you talk about set theory in Latin? Specifically, how do you say "set" as opposed to "union"?

In my joke about set theory in Latin: Hodie in universitate (ego studeo scientiam computorum) docebamur de theoria unionum. Professor nobis explicabat, cur numerus cardinalis unionis unionum non ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
365 views

What other numeral systems were used in Classical Rome?

In a recent question, I asked what the symbol was used for a thousand in Classical Latin, because I had heard somewhere that it was not 'M' which is what we are currently taught is the symbol (Short ...
Mitch's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
100 views

Is there a modern edition of Diophanti Alexandrini Arithmeticorum Libri?

The text Diophanti Alexandrini Arithmeticorum Libri Sex (Latin translation and commentary on the ancient work of Diophantus) has had a considerable impact on the history of mathematics. I was ...
user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
119 views

How would you say "root locus" (in robotics) in Latin?

"Root locus" is a diagram showing where the poles of a closed-loop system are depending on the amplification (gain) in the open-loop system. How would you say that in Latin? My attempt would ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
97 views

"Άγεωμέτρητος μηδεὶς εἰσίτω" in Latin

Legend has it that the gable of Plato's Academy read: "Let no one enter who is ignorant of geometry" ("Άγεωμέτρητος μηδεὶς εἰσίτω"). How do you render that in classical Latin? Here ...
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5 votes
0 answers
64 views

Is mathematikalpha a reliable source for mathematical vocabulary?

I am looking for a list of the mathematical terms used by Newton, Euler, Gauss, etc. in their writings. The only thing I found online are those two files by Steffen Polster on <mathematikalpha.de&...
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5 votes
3 answers
147 views

What does "Solutiones in medium affere visum est praeparatio ad solutionem." mean?

I am reading an article by Euler (Solutio problematis difficillimi a Fermatio propositi, Enestrom number 167) and I have trouble understanding the following sentence (§ 2, p. 50): Huius ergo ...
user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
544 views

What does “per se praeclarissima videtur” mean when talking about a difficult problem?

I am translating De numeris primis valde magnis by Leonhard Euler and I am somewhat puzzled by the following phrase on the second page: “per se praeclarissima videtur”. Ac profecto natura numerorum ...
user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
75 views

Why "absolute" instead of "absolutam"?

There's a famous piece of mathematics by János Bolyai, originally published in Latin, under the title Scientiam Spatii Absolute Veram Exhibens: A Veritate Aut Falsitate Axiomatis XI Euclidei, A Priori ...
Draconis's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
222 views

compass and straightedge in ancient Greek?

I am a mathematician and I'm wondering how the ancient Greek called a compass and a straightedge and how would you pronounce this in English? I know that today they are called κανόνας (kanónas) and ...
garondal's user avatar
  • 143
9 votes
2 answers
127 views

How to say that a mathematical curve contains a point?

What would be the suitable Latin verb to express the idea that a curve (e.g. a circle, a parabola) contains/includes a point? My first thought was parabola punctum continet but it seems that ...
user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is this word "manuducant" a typo or an obscure word?

I have the following sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina (I've already asked half a dozen questions about this paper), and one of the words manuducant (manvdvcant), shown in the snippet below, ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
113 views

Confusing translation for Euler

In this sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina, I'm having trouble deciphering the meaning (§ 20, p. 40): At vero quomodo vicissim series Lambertina ad aequationem trinomialem perduci queat, ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
286 views

Sentence with gerund or gerundive and infinitive

I'm trying to translate the following: [...] quem autem valorem aliter nisi appropinquando cognoscere non datur. Which comes from Euler (De Serie Lambertina/e). But I'm having trouble sorting out ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
103 views

How should this infinitive clause and this ut clause translate?

The sentence from Euler's De Serie Lambertina I'm working on now has the following form: Praesenti autem forma hanc seriem exhibere est visum, ut litterae A et B inter se permutabiles evaderent, ita ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
118 views

Translating a reflexive pronoun in a sentence with accusative

Translating a sentence from Vieta's In artem analyticen isagoge (available here) I'm having trouble: Et hic se praebet Geometram Analysta, opus verum efficiundo post alius, similis vero, resolutionem ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
126 views

Translation Help Needed in Euler's E025

Related to a previous question of mine, I'm working through the first paragraph of E025, Euler's Methodus Generalis Summandi Progressiones (available for download here). A translation has already been ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
237 views

Is this double accusative or hyperbaton or something else?

I've only been learning Latin for a month or so, but I'm specifically learning so that I can read scientific and mathematical texts from the 17th-19th centuries. It's slow going, of course- I'm only ...
Sam Gallagher's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
178 views

"For all" and "there exists"

The two most common mathematical quantifiers are "for all" (∀) and "there exists" (∃). I wondered how to render them in Latin. Here is my proposal: for all x: pro omnis x for all ...
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5 votes
1 answer
90 views

What is the meaning of "positive acceptus" in Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131?

From Gauss' Disquisitiones Arithmeticae §131: Sī p est numerus prīmus fōrmae 4n+1, erit +p, sī vērō p fōrmae 4n+3, erit -p residuum vel nōn-residuum cuiusvīs numerī prīmī quī positīvē acceptus ipsīus ...
Leaky Nun's user avatar
  • 837
4 votes
1 answer
173 views

How to translate this sentence from Euler's Dissertatio?

At the beginning of Dē frāctiōnibus continuīs dissertātiō, Euler writes the following: Variī in Analysin receptum sunt modī quantitātēs. in Analysin just means in Analysis but the rest of the ...
user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
198 views

What are the Latin translations of the mathematical terms differentiating, integrating and parameterizing?

I didn't find any site that translates these verbs in the mathematical sense. What are the Latin translations of these terms, and are there any sites that offer Latin translations of modern ...
Vince's user avatar
  • 765
5 votes
1 answer
159 views

What is the most modern calculus book in Latin?

I wonder if there is any modern math books especially calculus that is written in Latin like multivariable calculus, vector calculus etc. Not knowing how modern the get, I'd like to know: What is the ...
Vince's user avatar
  • 765
1 vote
1 answer
63 views

Can "Regula falsi" be interpreted as "False position"?

In Mathematics, there is a technique which is known as Regula Falsi, and it is heavily implied that its translation to English is "False position" (for example, in the Wikipedia article). This seemed ...
Ovi's user avatar
  • 113
7 votes
1 answer
795 views

How would you translate “playing with prime numbers” into Latin?

I'm building a website about prime numbers, and I want to put the following sentence: "playing with prime numbers" in Latin in the subtitle of the main page. Google Translate translation is: "ludens ...
Pedja's user avatar
  • 215
6 votes
1 answer
254 views

Substantivization of "continuum"

I wonder how to translate "continuum hypothesis" into Latin. Indeed, "continuum" is an adjective in Latin (so we would have "continuous hypothesis" if we were trying a literal translation) and I don't ...
user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
172 views

What is the relationship between "cut off" and "X-coordinate"?

Etymonline claims that abscissa originally meant 'cut off', but what's 'cut off' about an x-coordinate? X-coordinates are merely numbers, not lines. How did a word for 'cut off' come to be used for x-...
user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
773 views

How were fractions written and pronounced?

In English, when we want to express parts of wholes and certain numbers of said parts, we use fractions consisting of a denominator indicating how many equal pieces an item has been broken or divided ...
Media Matella Lucretia Flores's user avatar
4 votes
3 answers
363 views

What is the Latin Homophonic Group?

Equivalent question: What Latin letters won't equal 1? From: the homophonic group: a mathematical diversion --> This is an exercise from Michael Artin's Algebra on, well, abstract algebra. In this ...
BCLC's user avatar
  • 169
6 votes
2 answers
127 views

Quōmodo rēctē "derivative of f(x)" dīcere?

I am currently struggling to figure out how to translate the following phrase: [...] derivative of f(x) [...] I had a couple of initial ideas, namely: dēductīva [fūnctiō] dē f(x) dēductīva ...
Ethan Bierlein's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
348 views

A phrase of L. Euler on functions

I'm trying to understand the following sentence from Leonhard Euler's Institutionum calculi integralis Vol. III Chap. 2, bottom of p.40: Huiusmodi functiones arbitrarias, prouti hic feci, eiusmodi ...
Michael Bächtold's user avatar
4 votes
2 answers
299 views

A few L. Euler phrases to translate

I have a few Latin sentences from very old mathematical works by Leonard Euler. There is no their translation in the net. I do have their rough interpretation but need more precise and careful one. ...
user2626's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
335 views

How to translate "evaluate"?

In mathematics people say that Evaluate f at x What word in Latin means "evaluate"? The construction ex-valor-are -> evaloro, -are, -avi, -atum seems to be an analogue but I am not sure if this ...
Henricus V.'s user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
204 views

How to say "lower bound" and "upper bound"?

Lower bound, upper bound, infimum, supremum, minimum, and maximum are concepts in mathematics. I cannot find translations of them in Wikipedia and Latin dictionaries. Here are their translations in ...
Henricus V.'s user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
95 views

How to say by/on the basis of?

In mathematics, the following phrase is common: By Theorem 5.6, the function is differentiable. How do I say 'by' in Latin? I don't think 'ab' is appropriate to use here. One way is to put '...
Henricus V.'s user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
100 views

Dubious passage in Archimedes

I have been interested in finding and understanding the original Greek text for the following quote by Archimedes, which made it to Wikiquote: Those who claim to discover everything but produce no ...
giobrach's user avatar
  • 439
4 votes
1 answer
220 views

What is a digit?

Is there a good Latin word for a digit or figure? I might want to say that the sum of the digits of 43 is 7 or that an actor was paid a six-figure salary for a movie. It occurred to me that I don't ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
0 answers
94 views

What is the most helpful dictionary for post-medieval works of philosophy and mathematics?

I need Latin for my natural-language artificial intelligence research, and I've been at it for enough years that I can read Latin well, but need extensive practice with composition. Thus I have ...
Chris Lanz's user avatar
9 votes
3 answers
3k views

What is the correct Latin prefix for 'two-and-a-half-times'?

Question. What is the latin prefix for "2½ times" ? Remark. The question asks for the correct analogue of the prefix "sesqui-" which, of course, is the prefix for "1½ times".
guest's user avatar
  • 773
10 votes
1 answer
303 views

Where can I find standard translations of mathematics/physics terms in Latin?

Suppose I want to write a math paper in Latin. I need to translate terms such as "manifold", "holomorphic", "martingale", etc. The Latin Wikipedia only has a limited ...
Henricus V.'s user avatar
9 votes
2 answers
643 views

Latin phrase, modelled on "horror vacui", for the fear of "equality"?

A usual latin phrase is horror vacui, which in English can be rendered as fear of emptiness. Question: what do you consider a correct Latin translation of the English fear of equality? The question ...
guest's user avatar
  • 773
4 votes
0 answers
109 views

Which one is better: "sunt aequivalentes" or "aequivalent"?

If I want to say that two things are equivalent in Latin, I can imagine two ways using essentially the same word: X et Y sunt aequivalentes. X et Y aequivalent. Googling for the first option (...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
177 views

Superscript/suffix "ti"

Gauss wrote in his Ph.D. dissertation: Si quis e. g. in art. 3, aliaque incognitarum tamquam cognita spectata, reliquas per hanc et coefficientes datos rationaliter exprimere tentat, facile ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
10 votes
2 answers
645 views

The logical "then"

I am interested in translating the word "then" in logical statements like this: "If a number is prime, then it is squarefree." Or maybe better: "If x is even and x+y is odd, then y is odd." In common ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
15 votes
2 answers
790 views

"If and only if"

In mathematical literature "if and only if" (sometimes abbreviated as "iff"1) is a relatively common phrase. Saying "A if and only if B" means that A and B are equivalent logical statements. This is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
252 views

Phrasing "it remains to"

The phrase "it remains to" is pretty common in mathematics. It can be used in other contexts as well, but let me restrict my question to the abstract realm for concreteness. For example, this would ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar