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Questions tagged [modern-life]

'of modern life' - use this tag for questions about how modern words and concepts should be translated to Latin

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1 answer
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Translating plant names used attributively

In English and some other languages, a plant name (or a fruit name) can be used like an adjective ("attributively"), for example apple juice, oak wood, birch bark. When translated into Latin,...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
283 views

Is `patrick-conscriptus` a pun to name a software bot acting on Patrick's behalf?

I'm a programmer and I'm thinking of creating a bot to carry out tedious tasks on my behalf. My name is Patrick. Would patrick-conscriptus be a reasonable pun for its name, "the Patrick who was ...
Patrick Stevens's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
141 views

Is Traupman's "Conversational Latin for Oral Proficiency" of good latinity?

I am currently studying Latin and a friend has recommended Traupman's "Conversational Latin for Oral Proficiency" book. Can I trust that the vocabulary within this book is accurate, or ...
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7 votes
1 answer
2k views

How to have my hair cut?

I am looking for an expression for "I am having my hair cut". When I have my hair cut, I ask someone to cut my hair, instead of cutting my hair by myself. With secare for to cut, I think of ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
71 views

Is there a word in latin for "type"?

I'd like to know if there's a latin word for type. That sort of person that one is attracted to. Like "You ain't my type". I thought that the word "typus" could be used, but it ...
user avatar
11 votes
4 answers
1k views

Indeclinables: What are the strategies good Latinists use to deal with them?

I have read that the modern tendency is to translate a modern person's personal name into Latin but not his surname. So John Doe would be translated as Ioannes Doe. This seems sensible at face value, ...
Victor BC's user avatar
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6 votes
4 answers
394 views

Is there any Neo-Latin word for the concepts of "hacking" and "hacker"?

MY CONCLUSION: From the options I have seen so far, the options that seem to me best were, for a generic description of hacking, to say that it is in computatorium irrumpere, with a hacker being a ...
Victor BC's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
74 views

Latin translation of "model"

"model", when meaning "a pattern for imitation", is expressed by Latin exemplum, exemplar, forma, proplasma, according to the dictionary. "model" comes from modulus, ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
96 views

Which spell-checker can be used when writing in Latin on a computer?

So, I am interested, does any spell-checker software today (Aspell, Hunspell...) support Latin? Does it work well enough to be useful?
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
0 answers
118 views

How would you say "root locus" (in robotics) in Latin?

"Root locus" is a diagram showing where the poles of a closed-loop system are depending on the amplification (gain) in the open-loop system. How would you say that in Latin? My attempt would ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
131 views

How would you say "object oriented programming" in Latin?

So, how would you say "object oriented programming" in Latin? How would you translate "object" as an adjective? Would that be "obiectivus"? Or would "obiectivus"...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
2k views

Is there any way one could say "Hardcore Gamer"?

I know it’s a bit silly since I don’t think there was a concept of a gamer back then but just curious if it’s possible to make something close to that phrase?
Johhan Santana's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
277 views

What is the best translation for "livestreaming"?

I am looking for a brief and accurate expression to say "livestreaming" in Latin. Classical or New Latin style, or coined word are all okay. Are there any options?
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
3 answers
3k views

"Let the fu—rs rot"

As a continuation to my previous question... For the sci-fi story I'm writing, I need a Latin motto which would translate to "Let the fuckers rot!" (or, Ad usum Delphini, "Let the ...
Alexander's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
174 views

Holy Thermonuclear Napalm

I'm writing a sci-fi story about the Vatican inventing a very special weapon to eradicate heresy on mass scale. Since the weapon comes from the Roman Empire, it should be called in Latin, right? After ...
Alexander's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
451 views

How do you say 'same to you' as a reply to a greeting?

Greetings in Latin may use different adjectives ('bonum', 'faustum', 'felicem', etc.), just as in Romance languages; e.g. in Spanish the New Year greeting may be 'feliz año', 'buen año', 'próspero año'...
Marius Vivanconus Speluncus's user avatar
11 votes
3 answers
4k views

Could one consider using Latin as a daily casual language these days?

I just saw a video asking like how would one say I just had an avocado toast and thought about some of the new stuff that didn't exist back then. How would we integrate new words into the Latin ...
Johhan Santana's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
241 views

What would be good Latin names for modern book categories?

There are various ways to order/group books in a library. By author, in alphabetical order By size By category etc. Concerning 3) we might have the following names in Latin. They might be opera... ...
JobRozemond's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
166 views

How to talk about a mailing list in latin?

We have (wiki with sources) new latin words for the email service (cursus electronicus or cursus publicus electronicus), a single email (litterae electronicae or electrogramma, -tis n) and email ...
K-HB's user avatar
  • 420
5 votes
2 answers
793 views

"Ready, Set, Go!" in Latin

How would you translate the common sport phrase into Latin. Here is my thought thus far: Ready. It usually used to mean "on your marks". But I would like to take it as "prepare!", ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
524 views

"Project Management" in Latin

I was looking for a translation for "project management" and its adjacents (project manager etc.). There's surprisingly few direct translations for "project", but I've managed to ...
Pahlavan's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
214 views

What is "formatting" in Latin?

I would like to adapt the proverb dē gustibus nōn est disputandum ("there's no accounting for taste") to refer to formatting—the layout of text on a page, the font selection, the use of ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
169 views

What is a "rough draft" in Latin?

Suppose I'm preparing a speech for the Senate floor, and I want to make sure it sounds just right before I present it. So I come up with a rough draft, then revise it several times until I'm satisfied ...
Draconis's user avatar
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3 votes
0 answers
66 views

How we can monitor the size and impact of "Living Latin Community"

By "Living Latin community" I refer principally to those individuals who want to use Latin language in the actual-life for whatever reason they have (the main reason is probably in order to learn). ...
d_e's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
370 views

What can be used as a Latin word for "Meltdown" (in the sense used for people with Autism)?

I have a lesser form of Autism (that generally doesn't really manifest much unless people actually live with me or in specific situations) and sometimes I can have a meltdown. I write a journal in ...
Victor BC's user avatar
  • 924
4 votes
0 answers
55 views

Were there common Latin stutter words? [duplicate]

In English, we say often say 'um' when we're trying to think about the next word to say. In Japanese it's 'anno.' Is there a known phrase like this in Latin?
Nickimite's user avatar
  • 2,953
7 votes
1 answer
685 views

Is there a New Latin word for Cyborg?

Good day! Originally “cyborg” came from English cybernetic organism. In Latin that would of course be organismus cyberneticus. Given the mouthful of that, it is no wonder that people tend to simply ...
Victor BC's user avatar
  • 924
10 votes
3 answers
2k views

How do you say "online" and "offline" in Latin?

Good day! How would you go about saying the expression "online" or "offline" in Latin? Maybe something like Portuguese Conectado and Desconectado (connected and disconnected)? Couldn't find it ...
Victor BC's user avatar
  • 924
4 votes
3 answers
386 views

Translation of "One who leads the way"

I have a grad student as a Latin teacher. I don't feel comfortable addressing him as teacher, magister, or any other title because he doesn't really command his classroom. Rather, he guides us in ...
Nickimite's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
829 views

What are the proper terms for students?

I'm curious about appropriate terms for students. What should I call somebody in: Primary school Secondary school College/university undergraduate program College/university postgraduate program
Nickimite's user avatar
  • 2,953
2 votes
1 answer
123 views

What are the proper terms for highly-educated people?

I'm curious about terms that can be used to describe these people, or the qualifications themselves: College/university graduate Somebody with a "Master's" qualification Somebody with a "Doctorate" ...
Nickimite's user avatar
  • 2,953
4 votes
0 answers
75 views

How to properly convey non-Latin words in a practical Latin text?

My question here is firmly in regards to contemporary Latin, in the sense of Latin to be used not as a dead language (in other words, I am not looking for a Nosoponian answer that invalidates anything ...
Victor BC's user avatar
  • 924
3 votes
1 answer
157 views

How does one say lowlands in contemporary Latin?

How would one write the expression "lowlands" in contemporary Latin? Would it be like in Spanish, terra bassa, or would it be something like terra subiecta or even terra infera? I would prefer an ...
Victor BC's user avatar
  • 924
5 votes
1 answer
202 views

Living Latin term for work (in contrast with life outside of work)?

I know that there is no Classical concept of work in contrast with life (as in "I was at work yesterday" or "At work, people did X", etc.), but I was wondering if there is any post-Classical Latin ...
Victor BC's user avatar
  • 924
14 votes
6 answers
10k views

What should the corona virus be called in Latin?

The corona virus (or a specific kind thereof) is a hot topic, and one should of course be able to discuss it in Latin. But what should we call the thing in Latin? Both corona and virus are Latin words,...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
186 views

A software in Latin?

I visited a webpage translating a bunch of IT words into Latin, so I know the vocabulary does exist. As I'm an avid language learner, sometimes I download apps and software in a foreign language to ...
Quidam's user avatar
  • 1,776
8 votes
1 answer
334 views

Latin in the European Parliament

I vaguely remember that once the following happened in the European Parliament: One member of the parliament delivered a speech in Latin, and afterwards another member stood up and answered the speech ...
Sir Cornflakes's user avatar
12 votes
5 answers
335 views

Are there official Latin translators?

A colleague had this problem recently: A degree certificate from their home university was issued in Latin, but they need it in English or Finnish for the purpose of a grant application. Apparently no ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
2k views

What is a "click" in Greek or Latin?

Linguistically, "clicks" are a type of sound found in certain African languages, mostly Khoisan and Southern Bantu. The English word is also used for various other sharp, high-pitched noises (like ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.2k
4 votes
3 answers
2k views

What should we call a laptop?

This question arose the other day in our chat room: What is a laptop in Latin? There are several possible ways to approach this. It feels most reasonable to me to take a word for "computer" and ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
86 views

What are auscultatores?

In honor of the last broadcast of the Nuntiī Latinī: Nuntii Latini Radiophoniae Finnicae Generalis, qui inde ab anno millesimo nongentesimo undenonagesimo (1989) iam triginta annos septimanatim ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.2k
4 votes
2 answers
137 views

What is a "sockpuppet"?

Inspired by a recent meta question, which I had to write in English for lack of appropriate Latin vocabulary: A "sockpuppet", on the internet, is an alternate identity someone creates for nefarious ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.2k
3 votes
1 answer
79 views

Can I submit a manuscript with 'submittere'?

As a scientist, I frequently find myself submitting a manuscript to a journal for peer review and hopefully publication. What would be a good Latin verb for this sense of "submit"? It could also be a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
3k views

What should we call the space beyond the world?

To the Romans, if I understand right, the word caelum "sky" incorporated everything above the earth: the atmosphere, the space beyond it, and even the thrones of the gods. But nowadays we divide ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.2k
3 votes
1 answer
118 views

What is the difference between "return" and "yield"?

In the Python programming language, "yield" and "return" are keywords with specific meanings. A function can either yield a result (sending that result back and then continuing to work), or return it ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.2k
9 votes
1 answer
270 views

Audio and video... and tango?

Audio and video are two (apparently XX-century) concepts. Both take the same form as 1st-person sing., present tense Latin verbs. Wiktionary articles for the English words (audio, video) assert that ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.5k
4 votes
1 answer
211 views

Latin terms in (medical) clinical letters - UK

Today I came across this news article. In short, the Academy of Medical Royal Colleges (in the UK) is providing new guidelines to medical doctors on the writing of clinical letters to patients. Among ...
luchonacho's user avatar
  • 12.4k
5 votes
1 answer
356 views

How to say "viral" in Latin?

Consider the phrase: The video went viral How could the concept of "viral" in the above meaning be expressed in Latin? This is clearly a recent word, so there will not be a native one. Virus is ...
luchonacho's user avatar
  • 12.4k
7 votes
2 answers
190 views

How would one talk about an "algorithm"?

Suppose I want to discuss an algorithm in Latin: that is, a series of steps to calculate a result from an input, usually involving mathematical formulae. How would I say this? The English word came ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67.2k
2 votes
1 answer
49 views

How does ancient and modern arbitration differ?

There is a legal thing called arbitration in modern world, and the Romans seem to have had the word arbitratio. I wonder whether the modern arbitration and the Roman arbitratio (and the related words ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar