Questions tagged [vulgar-latin]

For questions about the Latin that was commonly spoken, rather than written (i.e. classical) Latin. Note that this does not refer solely to profanity, but any non-standard, spoken dialect of Latin.

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2
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1answer
76 views

What evidence is there for volēre over volere?

In this answer, fdb mentions the Classical verb volō, velle transforming into *voleō, volēre in Vulgar Latin. The main evidence for this is a form volendi in Augustine and reflexes like voglio, volere ...
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2answers
803 views

Was there ever a difference between 'volo' and 'volo'?

The words "I want" and "I fly" are both volō. Was there ever any difference in pronunciation in the classical era or later? I expect such differences to be more likely in vulgar Latin. The rest ...
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1answer
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Latin expression for “carrying something on one's back”

In Spanish, the word cuesta is nowadays used as slope. Nonetheless, the etymology of the word indicates that it comes fom Latin costa, ae meaning "a side" but also "a rib". In fact, an old meaning for ...
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1answer
32 views

What semantic notions underlie 'fold' with 'plight; predicament'?

Of the two noun homonyms 'pledge', I'm asking merely about that derived from Latin. For the other homonym from Proto-Germanic , please see this. Etymonline for 'plight (n.1)' : "condition or ...
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2answers
946 views

What is the superlative of ipse?

In later Latin, as ipse started to lose its force, Petronius uses ipsimus for emphasis: Tamen ad delicias ipsimi [domini] annos quattuordecim fui. Nec turpe est, quod dominus iubet. Ego tamen et ...
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2answers
80 views

Can “ave, vire” be used colloquially as “hey, bro”?

There's a Spanish webcomic called ¡Eh, tío!, an expression that can be translated into English as hey, man or maybe as hey, bro. The webcomic had some time ago a story arc set in an alternate universe ...
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0answers
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Could the vulgar verb “toccari” have existed in Vulgar Latin?

As a follow-up of the previous interesting question (Did the Vulgar Latin verb "toccare" exist? ), could the vulgar Vulgar Latin verb toccari (in the sense of the deponent verb masturbari) ...
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2answers
710 views

Did the Vulgar Latin verb “toccare” exist?

According to the Royal Spanish Academy dictionary, the word tocar 'touch' has its origin in the toc toc onomatopoeia. Something similar is registered in Etymonline for the English verb touch: from ...
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0answers
327 views

How would Marcus Aurelius have pronounced his Latin?

It is my understanding that Julius Caesar, Cicero, Octavian (Augustus) would have pronounced Latin in a manner that is decidedly Classical, characterised by: "v" as /w/ "c" and "g" always hard (i.e., ...
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59 views

Do we have evidence of clipped words in Latin?

In English, it's common for words to be clipped down to their first couple syllables: "brother" becomes "bro", "university" becomes "uni", "doctor" becomes "doc", "veteran" becomes "vet", and so on. ...
5
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1answer
185 views

What do we know about Vulgar Latin pronunciation?

Nowadays, most Latinists learn the "reconstructed classical" pronunciation: an attempt at reconstructing the way Cicero, Caesar, or Vergil might have spoken in formal settings. However, it seems ...
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Is *rīcus attested?

The word for "rich" in most Romance languages looks something like, well, "rich". It declines like a first/second declension adjective, and seems to go back to Germanic *rīkijaz (possibly through ...
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284 views

What would a 5th-6th century learned Latin pronunciation have sounded like?

Is there any information on the status of learned pronunciations from the late imperial period up to 1000 CE? I am wondering because the Classical Latin reconstruction seems to make clear that by the ...
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1answer
217 views

Is there support for claiming -gn- was pronounced as /ŋ/ in classical Latin?

According to what I have learned, -gn- was commonly pronounced /ŋn/, e.g. [ˈmaŋ.nʊs] (magnus). However, this excerpt from Encyclopædia Britannica had me wondering: The sound represented by ng (...
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1answer
93 views

When did the infinitive of purpose arise?

In Classical Latin, purpose would normally be expressed with ut, or ad with a gerund, or a supine with a verb of motion, or numerous other ways. However, in later and vulgar Latin (most notably the ...
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77 views

Is the suffix -izo, -izare, -izavi, -izatum formal?

The suffix -ize (or similar) are used to form verbs from nouns and adjectives in several Romance languages. Wiktionary suggests that this stems from the vulgar latin -izo, -izare, -izavi, -izatum, ...
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1answer
142 views

How did '-met' + 'ipse' + '-issimus' compound to mean <the same> (in *metipsimus)?

[ Wiktionary for *metipsimus :] Etymology [0.] From -met (emphatic suffix) + ipse (“himself”) + -issimus (superlative suffix). Adjective *metipsimus (feminine *metipsima, neuter *...
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1answer
87 views

What semantic notions underlie <the same> (in *metipsimus) and <even> (in 'même')?

[ Wiktionary for 'même' :] Etymology [3.] From Middle French mesme, from Old French mesme, earlier meïsme, [2.] from Vulgar Latin *metipsimus [= the same], [1.] from Latin -met [emphatic suffix] ...
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1answer
210 views

Appendix probi: “cannelam nun canianus”

Appendix probi was a book written in 3rd-4th century AD to correct people's written Latin. It consists of lines of the form "xxx non yyy", meaning that people commonly wrote yyy, where xxx is the "...
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5answers
753 views

How did Latin sound?

Does anybody know how normal Latin dialog sounded — not the oratory or ecclesiastical versions? Are there any audio files that you recommend?
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1answer
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What underlying semantic notions connect the Latin for '(from then) to this hour' to the French « encore »?

[ CNRTL : ] Du lat[in] vulg[aire] *hinc ha (c) hora ou *hinc ad horam; la forme a[ncienne] fr[ançaise] uncore, oncore est due à l'infl[uence] de onque, onc*. This thread redirects you to the ...
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1answer
206 views

Did word order have any function in colloquial Latin?

In Latin, word order is mostly free. This is used intensively by poets and other authors to achieve a desired rhythm or rhetoric figures like chiasms. However, this does not apply to regular, spoken ...
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1answer
179 views

Can the use of articles be traced back to Late/Vulgar Latin?

The Romance articles developed from Latin ille. Was ille already used in a way that resembles articles more than demonstratives in very late or Vulgar Latin? Or did it this use only emerge after Latin ...
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What underlying semantic notions connect 'studere' to 'to put in, put aside, spare, keep'?

[ Etymonline on 'etui (n.)' : ] 1610s, also ettuy, etwee from French étui, Old French estui (12c.) "case, box, container," back-formation from estuier "put in put aside, spare; to keep, shut up, ...
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3answers
967 views

When did the consonant U (i.e., V) begin to be pronounced as the fricative [v] instead of [w]?

It's well established that the consonantal u (or v) was pronounced as [w] in Classical Latin (i.e., w as in wine). Of course, Romance languages developed voiced fricatives out of this u-consonant, ...
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75 views

What underlying notion connects “roll” (in “volvere”) to “leap” (in “*volvitare”)?

[vault (v.1) :]   [...] from Vulgar Latin *volvitare "to turn, leap," frequentative of Latin volvere "to turn, turn around, roll" (see volvox). [...] I ask not about the meanings "turn" or "...