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Questions tagged [nominativus]

For questions about the nominative case.

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Did Latin have any ergative verbs?

An "ergative verb" is a verb that can either take two nouns (a subject and an object) or only one (a subject), where the object of the two-noun form corresponds to the subject of the one-noun form. ...
2
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1answer
86 views

Can cases be replaced with prepositions + nominative?

Consider the word domus. Standard cases are domi, domo, domum, domo, domis. I wonder whether we could replace the above (and perhaps every single noun), with the "equivalent" preposition + nominative....
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4answers
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Why nominative instead of accusative with verb “sum”?

Recently I've been learning about the accusative mode, in/direct objects and in/transitive verbs. In light of this, consider the phrase: Nilus fluvius est I'm interested in the rationale (...
6
votes
1answer
82 views

Vicis - no singular nominative?

I read that vicis has no singular nominative, but it does have a plural one - vices. I find this very interesting, but hard to understand. It is like if the ontological configuration of space-time ...
8
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1answer
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Is the nominative gerund attested?

I'd always heard that the gerund had no nominative, with the present active infinitive taking the place of the missing form: volāre difficile est, rather than *volāndum. However, in the comments on ...
13
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2answers
236 views

Why do we call a case a casus? And why rectus, obliquus?

I would translate the grammatical word casus (whence English case) as "a fall". And, indeed, the German word is Fall, Dutch naamval ("name fall"). Why is this word used for the grammatical function of ...
10
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4answers
726 views

Is the complement of esse in nominative or accusative when esse is a subject?

Suppose I want to say something like "I like being a human". There are undoubtedly several ways to phrase that in Latin, but I want to do it so that it the subject is "to be a human". The complete ...
4
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1answer
2k views

Why is “Bonam Fortunam” the correct way to wish someone good fortune instead of “Bona Fortuna”?

I remember being told this by a Latin teacher, but I have since forgotten the details. Why should I use the accusative case instead of the nominative here?
9
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1answer
176 views

In what case is “Venetiarum” in “Patriarchatus Venetiarum”?

Also, is it a noun or an adjective? What's the nominative? (moved second question here) Sorry, I'm a total n00b and checked all sorts of declension tables but I just can't figure this one out.