Questions tagged [deponent-verbs]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4
votes
1answer
76 views

What is the origin of the deponent verbs and their evolution in Romance languages?

How deponent (and semi-deponent) verbs appeared in Latin, and why? How did they evolve in descend languages? They seem extincts in descend languages (why?) but there are probably specific structured ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

Gone But Not Forgotten

On the Andrew Marr TV-prog (Sunday, 10/11/2019) General Sir Nicholas Carter was interviewed. When Marr asked about the declining interest in Remembrance-Day Commemorations, the general quoted ...
3
votes
2answers
90 views

Can you split “natus sum”?

What are the conditions to make a reasonable hyperbate? Reasonable, I mean, if I don't want to sound to poetical, as I know the word order is more free in poetry, the same rules for word orders don't ...
3
votes
0answers
61 views

Non-deponent intransitive verbs in Ablative Absolute constructions and other dominant participle constructions?

As is well-known, intransitive deponent verbs can enter into Ablative Absolute constructions (e.g., Cicerone mortuo, Cicerone nato, etc.) and in (other) dominant participle constructions (e.g., ante ...
2
votes
0answers
24 views

More verbs like “mensuro”, active verb derived from deponent?

I just read on Wiktionary that the Late/Vulgar verb mensuro (I measure) comes from Classical mensura (a measure or measurement), which comes from mensus, the perfect participle of the deponent verb ...
6
votes
4answers
305 views

Do non-deponent Latin verbs ever have a “middle voice”?

In Ancient Greek, verbs often take a "middle voice", neither active nor passive. The forms usually look identical to the passive on the surface, but can take direct objects and cannot take an agent (...
2
votes
0answers
65 views

Could the vulgar verb “toccari” have existed in Vulgar Latin?

As a follow-up of the previous interesting question (Did the Vulgar Latin verb "toccare" exist? ), could the vulgar Vulgar Latin verb toccari (in the sense of the deponent verb masturbari) ...
6
votes
2answers
156 views

What is the difference in meaning/usage between “nasciturus” and “nascendus”?

Both nasciturus and nascendus seem to exist. Words ending in -turus are often described as future active participles, and words ending in -ndus as future passive participles (they are also called ...
4
votes
1answer
57 views

Why is dignetur used as if it were in the active voice?

For 2 Thessalonians 1:11, the Vulgata has the following: In quo etiam oramus semper pro vobis: ut dignetur vos vocatione sua Deus nosteret impleat omnem voluntatem bonitatis, et opus fidei in ...
4
votes
1answer
89 views

Is there something like an “anti-deponent” verb in Latin?

Deponent verbs are those who are written (normally) in passive form but are active in meaning. loquor, loquī, locūtus sum is a common example in Latin. I wonder if the opposite exists, i.e. a verb ...
1
vote
1answer
95 views

Revertere or reverti in transitive use?

If I want to use the verb revertere/reverti transitively (with an object different from the subject), should I choose active or passive forms? Intuition suggests that active forms are preferred for ...
4
votes
1answer
115 views

Are there classical examples of the imperative patere?

I wanted to see how the imperative patĕre of pati is used and I made a corpus search. However, most of the results seem to be polluted with the infinitive patēre, and I'm having hard time ...
9
votes
2answers
842 views

Are Deponent Verbs a feature of the Latin Language or Means of Translation?

sequi as an example is a deponent verb. All forms are translated active, but look like passive forms. Is this a feature of the Latin language (i.e. were contemporary linguists aware of such a feature)...
2
votes
1answer
104 views

What is the uncontracted form of “κεῖμαι”? (Greek)

I got this word κεῖμαι while trying to learn ὑποκείμενον, found in this answer to another question. All the deponent verbs I've run across so far had an ο for theme vowel, as in: βούλομαι or ...
11
votes
1answer
311 views

How to make a deponent passive in meaning?

I was thinking about the verb sequi, a deponent which means to follow. I was wondering, how do you put the deponent into a passive form? So is it possible to translate the following sentences into ...
8
votes
1answer
481 views

Is the perfect participle in deponent verbs active or passive in meaning?

I recently read this interesting question in which Joonas provides a very instructive answer. It still left me, however, with some questions. "Confitentes iterum ac tertio interrogavi supplicium ...
10
votes
1answer
505 views

How do I use gerundives of obligation for deponent verbs?

(Inspired by the comments on this answer.) The gerundive of obligation is a wonderful little idiom in Latin, as in Cato's famous mantra Carthāgō dēlenda est "Carthage must be destroyed" In this ...
8
votes
1answer
193 views

Formation of participles from deponent verbs

Here I have the deponent verb persequor, persequi, persecutus sum, persecutum. Following standard deponent rules, I am able to form the following (apparently these active participles are active in ...
7
votes
1answer
126 views

Comparing verto and vertor

Here I have two words: verto, vertere, verti, versum (versus) vertor, verti, versus sum, — (I assume it's deponent) They both mean "turn" according to the Cambridge Latin Course Book V, ...
13
votes
1answer
148 views

Can a verbum deponens go along with an accusativus?

In Plinius I encountered: "Confitentes iterum ac tertio interrogavi supplicium minatus" Is supplicium some sort of accusativus belonging to minatus, which comes from deponens minor? If a form is ...
14
votes
1answer
99 views

When and where was the non-deponent form of verb “miror” used?

I've heard that deponent verb "miror" also had a non-deponent form. As far as I know it was in medieval Latin. So is it true? When exactly was the verb "mirare" used? Was it used everywhere, or was it ...
19
votes
1answer
1k views

Are there examples of passive imperative forms of non-deponent verbs in ancient literature?

Imperative forms and deponent verbs are quite common ancient Latin literature, and imperative forms of deponent verbs also occur. But are there examples of passive imperative forms of non-deponent ...