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Questions tagged [deponent-verbs]

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4
votes
1answer
54 views

Why is dignetur used as if it were in the active voice?

For 2 Thessalonians 1:11, the Vulgata has the following: In quo etiam oramus semper pro vobis: ut dignetur vos vocatione sua Deus nosteret impleat omnem voluntatem bonitatis, et opus fidei in ...
3
votes
1answer
71 views

Is there something like an “anti-deponent” verb in Latin?

Deponent verbs are those who are written (normally) in passive form but are active in meaning. loquor, loquī, locūtus sum is a common example in Latin. I wonder if the opposite exists, i.e. a verb ...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Revertere or reverti in transitive use?

If I want to use the verb revertere/reverti transitively (with an object different from the subject), should I choose active or passive forms? Intuition suggests that active forms are preferred for ...
4
votes
1answer
105 views

Are there classical examples of the imperative patere?

I wanted to see how the imperative patĕre of pati is used and I made a corpus search. However, most of the results seem to be polluted with the infinitive patēre, and I'm having hard time ...
8
votes
2answers
731 views

Are Deponent Verbs a feature of the Latin Language or Means of Translation?

sequi as an example is a deponent verb. All forms are translated active, but look like passive forms. Is this a feature of the Latin language (i.e. were contemporary linguists aware of such a feature)...
2
votes
1answer
95 views

What is the uncontracted form of “κεῖμαι”? (Greek)

I got this word κεῖμαι while trying to learn ὑποκείμενον, found in this answer to another question. All the deponent verbs I've run across so far had an ο for theme vowel, as in: βούλομαι or ...
10
votes
1answer
237 views

How to translate a deponent passive?

I was thinking about the verb sequi, an deponent which means to follow. I was wondering, how do you translate the deponent into a passive form? So is it possible to translate the following sentences ...
6
votes
1answer
375 views

Is the perfect participle in deponent verbs active or passive in meaning?

I recently read this interesting question in which Joonas provides a very instructive answer. It still left me, however, with some questions. "Confitentes iterum ac tertio interrogavi supplicium ...
9
votes
1answer
385 views

How do I use gerundives of obligation for deponent verbs?

(Inspired by the comments on this answer.) The gerundive of obligation is a wonderful little idiom in Latin, as in Cato's famous mantra Carthāgō dēlenda est "Carthage must be destroyed" In this ...
9
votes
1answer
156 views

Formation of participles from deponent verbs

Here I have the deponent verb persequor, persequi, persecutus sum, persecutum. Following standard deponent rules, I am able to form the following (apparently these active participles are active in ...
8
votes
1answer
103 views

Comparing verto and vertor

Here I have two words: verto, vertere, verti, versum (versus) vertor, verti, versus sum, — (I assume it's deponent) They both mean "turn" according to the Cambridge Latin Course Book V, ...
12
votes
1answer
122 views

Can a verbum deponens go along with an accusativus?

In Plinius I encountered: "Confitentes iterum ac tertio interrogavi supplicium minatus" Is supplicium some sort of accusativus belonging to minatus, which comes from deponens minor? If a form is ...
13
votes
1answer
86 views

When and where was the non-deponent form of verb “miror” used?

I've heard that deponent verb "miror" also had a non-deponent form. As far as I know it was in medieval Latin. So is it true? When exactly was the verb "mirare" used? Was it used everywhere, or was it ...
19
votes
1answer
966 views

Are there examples of passive imperative forms of non-deponent verbs in ancient literature?

Imperative forms and deponent verbs are quite common ancient Latin literature, and imperative forms of deponent verbs also occur. But are there examples of passive imperative forms of non-deponent ...