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Questions tagged [verbs]

Questions concerning verbs: words describing action.

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Sentence without a verb

After finishing Haury's Latin translation of The Little Prince, namely Regulus, I found another Latin version by Alexander Winkler. In Chapter 1, I noticed this sentence (in boldface): Semper vero ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
68 views

How to say "to (de)centralize" in Latin?

How does one say "to centralize" or "to decentralize" in Latin?
Geremia's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
215 views

Shouldn't be "intravisset" instead of "intrasset"?

The following excerpt comes from Titus Livius Ad urbe condita, liber XXV, capititulum XXXI (emphasis mine): Paucis ante diebus quam Syracusae caperentur, T. Otacilius cum quinqueremibus octoginta ...
Charo's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
158 views

"To sound (like)" in Latin

The verb sound in English sometimes acts copulative. The definition of this sense in Merriam–Webster's dictionary is to make or convey an impression especially when heard // it sounds good to me // ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
337 views

Why is the verb of the main clause not in the infinitive in this oratio obliqua?

Caesar milites cohortatus est ne ea, quae accidissent, graviter ferrent neve his rebus terrentur We have indirect speech, the main verb is a deponent verb who is in the perfect past but shouldn't it ...
hellofriends's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
381 views

Syntax of sentences with the verb "pudet"

In Lewis and Short, I have seen that the verb pudeo is chiefly used as an impersonal verb. In fact, I have found some examples of such usage in chapter XXIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata. ...
Charo's user avatar
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10 votes
3 answers
258 views

Questions on reading the prologue of Aesopus Latinus via LLPSI

Duplex libelli dos est: quod risum movet  et quod prudenti vitam consilio monet. Calumniari si quis autem voluerit  quod arbores loquantur, non tantum ferae, ... (Line 3~6) Dos is explained as a ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
77 views

Why don't "number" and "count" have the same root?

I noticed that in Turkish "number" (sayı) and "counting" (saymak) come from the same root (say-). In English and other European languages number comes from Latin "numerus"...
zeynel's user avatar
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3 votes
4 answers
859 views

How can I express "to make a wish"?

I want a phrase for "to make a wish" instead of a single verb "to wish", in order to make the line of lyrics long enough for the music. The noun for "wish" may be optatum,...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
175 views

Verb usage with spend and waiting

I am confused on which verbs (for spend and waiting) to use for the phrase: "Don't spend your life waiting to live" "Noli habe vitam exspectans vivere" Is habe the correct verb to ...
Longsword's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
224 views

Why does "abesse" have a present active participle while "adesse" does not?

I found that the verb "Abesse" unlike "Esse" or "Adesse" has a present active participle. What makes "Abesse" different?
Sapiens's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
203 views

Verb splitting noun and adjective [duplicate]

The concluding prayer of the prime office says: ℣. Dóminus nos benedícat, ✠ et ab omni malo deféndat, et ad vitam perdúcat ætérnam. Why does the verb (perdúcat) split the noun (vitam) and the ...
Geremia's user avatar
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5 votes
4 answers
1k views

How one can say "The door opened" in Latin?

I'm interested in knowing all the possible grammatical (i.e. morphosyntactic) ways to express the perfect construction "The door opened" in Latin. It seems to me that, in this case, a ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
76 views

Anticausative/Mediopassive constructions in perfect form?

I was wondering what is the correct analysis/interpretation of exstincta sunt in the following text from Cicero: quarum rerum recordatio et memoria si una cum illo occidisset, desiderium ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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2 votes
0 answers
143 views

Latin verbs describing bodily sensing vs. intellectual sensing

For each of the 5 senses, does Latin have distinct verbs for the intellectual act that follows from the bodily act of sensation? For example: Bodily act of sensing Corresponding act of intellect to ...
Geremia's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
83 views

What are the regular rules that govern the deriving of the perfect active stem from the present stem? [duplicate]

In Keller's Learn to Read Latin: In the third principal part of capio, capere, ce(long)pi, caphls, the root vowel changes to a long -e-. The change of the vowel indicates a change in tense. A change ...
Tim's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
509 views

How are the 3rd and 4th principal parts of a verb formed from their stems and endings?

In Keller's Learn to Read Latin: Most verbs of the first conjugation have principal parts that follow the pattern of ambulō, ambulāre, ambulāvī, ambulātum (an intransitive verb) or amō, amāre, amāvī, ...
Tim's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
218 views

Are the present infinitive of the active periphrastic and the future active infinitive of the verb the same concept?

On p270 of Keller's Learn to Read Latin The present infinitive of the active periphrastic is also used as the future active infinitive of the verb. Thus, for example, rectirus, -a, -um esse may be ...
Tim's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
175 views

What is the fourth principal part of an intransitive verb in this sentence?

On p25 in Keller's Learn to Read Latin: As is explained in Section 7, the fourth principal part of a verb is usually the perfect passive participle ofthat verb. in this book, two different endings of ...
Tim's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
362 views

amatus or amatum - which one is the perfect passive participle form

I've just started studying Wheelock. In the Vocabula section, the entry for amo is amo, amare, amavi, amatum. Yet most dictionaries give the past participle as amatus. Which is correct?
Brian Birmingham's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
240 views

In “word x is case y”, what dictates the verb’s number?

In the languages I am familiar with where verbs are pluralised, if you have more than one subject, the verb has to agree in number to however many subjects there are. However, in Lingua latīna per sē ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
249 views

How can I tell the difference between intransitive verbs, and absolute transitive verbs?

In Keller's Learn to Read Latin 11. Distinguishing Transitive and Intransitive Verbs A transitive verb expresses an action that is directly exerted on a person or thing. The person or thing receiving ...
Tim's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
217 views

What does "1" mean in vocabulary entries?

On p24 in Keller's Learn to Read Latin: ambulo, ambulire, ambulivi, amhulitum (1-intr.) walk amo, amare, amavi, amatus (1-tr.) love cogito (1-tr.) think; ponder do, dare, dedi, datus give, grant ...
Tim's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
285 views

Translation of the genitive gerund

I came across this sentence from Livy in Roma Aeterna, and although I believe I grasp the general meaning, I don't really understand the use of the genitive gerund 'sperandi': Deinde, cum minus agri ...
William's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
109 views

I need to translate a quote

This quote is original: "Even to the question whether there can be only one truth, the answer is twofold" I used Google translate to translate it to latin and this is what I got: "Etiam ...
Aidar Kadyr's user avatar
-4 votes
1 answer
78 views

What are some English words which derrive from the latin "mirrari"? [closed]

Do there exist English words which derrive from the latin "mirrari"?
Samuel Muldoon's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
597 views

Why does the length of a vowel before verb endings change?

I'm learning Latin and I see that the stem I am supposed to add things onto keeps changing from long to short and back again. For example, take teneō, tenēre, tenuī, tentum. As I see the present ...
John Matthew's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
152 views

“Itis” Versus “Is” in Latin

I am learning Latin on Duolingo, and the app does not clarify when to use “itis” and when to use “is”. They both mean “to go”, for the second person singular in present tense. Clarification would be ...
ArthD21's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
75 views

Gerund vs infinitive

I'm currently reading Ad Alpes and came across the following sentence: "Nonne sunt qui putent earum volatu res futuras portendi?" Now, as I understand it the meaning of this sentence is: &...
William's user avatar
  • 453
1 vote
1 answer
76 views

Meanings of 'furo'

I am finding some conflicting information about the word furo. According to Lewis and Short, it only means furo/furere, a defective 3rd conjugation word meaning to be in a rage. In L&S, only furor ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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6 votes
0 answers
75 views

Paradigm of (reduplicated) "fhefhaked"?

Do we have any reasonable speculations about a possible paradigm of archaic fhefhaked? I found an unreduplicated paradigm on Wikipedia, but I cannot judge its validity: 1st Sing. *fēkai 2nd Sing. ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
263 views

How do I create an agent noun from velle?

In a previous question, I asked how to make an agent noun from volo, with the intended verb volare. In the comments, it was mentioned that volo is also a form of the irregular verb, velle. Is there an ...
Adam's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
379 views

How do I create an agent noun from volo?

I'd like to create an agent noun from the verb volo (volare), meaning "one who flies". For some additional context, this will be used as a name for an animal that flies but has ...
Adam's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
334 views

Is the perfect passive always formed like so: verb + sum/es/est?

I'm using Wheelock's Latin and in the chapter which introduces the perfect passive system I came across this sentence: "Ubi haec tragoedia recitāta est, senex sententiīs iūdicum est līberātus.&...
William's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
454 views

How to analyze and translate "non se luxu neque inertiae corrumpendum dedit" (Sal. Jug. 6)?

By taking a look at various translations of the sentence in bold below, which is excerpted from a famous portrait of Jugurtha by Sallust, one could infer that the datives luxu (cf. luxui) and inertiae ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
172 views

Use of passive verb in "Echō iuvenem sēcrētō sequitur"

In chapter XIII of Latin Via Ovid, the authors have the following sentences (bolding is mine): Ōlim Narcissus cum cēteris iuvenibus animālia fera in silvīs et montibus sequitur. Forte sōlus errat, et ...
Adam's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
85 views

Where in ‘quibus vidēmus optābilīs mortēs fuisse’ is the act of choosing expressed?

Towards the end of Cicero’s Tusculan disputations book 1, he says: Ita sunt multī, quibus vidēmus optābilīs mortēs fuisse cum glōriā. Cic. Tusc. 1.116 My translation of this is presently ‘So many ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
94 views

What is the relationship between cubō and cumbō?

Various prefixed verbs, such as recumbō "lie back" and succumbō "collapse", seem to point at a basic form *cumbō (-ere), meaning something like "lie down". However, as ...
Draconis's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
188 views

"Odoratus est" in Genesis 8:21

Genesis 8:21 says "Odōrātusque est Dominus odōrem suāvitātis". What is "odoratus est"? It looks like the perfect passive participle of "odoro", but that doesn't make ...
quq's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
93 views

Is "dante" a participle in Ps 103:28

What parts of the verb are dante and aperiente in Ps 103:28 (Vulgate)? dante te illis colligent aperiente te manum tuam omnia implebuntur bonitate. My guess is the ablative of the present participle (...
user558840's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
185 views

To think of someone

I have been trying to translate this English phrase into Latin properly, and I started to check it in some resources. In this text it goes: "..., cum de tuis cogitas,...". And I have no idea ...
StackOverflowUser's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
57 views

What is the best Latin counterpart for 'reach' or 'contact'?

In English you can use the verbs "reach" or "contact" to mean being in contact with someone without specifying the method. When you don't want to specify whether you are writing a ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
217 views

Omitting a verb when it is the same for both parts of the sentence

The grammar book I'm studying translates the following sentence like this: English: The death is certain, uncertain is the day of death. Latin: Mors certa, dies mortis incerta est. However, I'd ...
m26a's user avatar
  • 307
7 votes
1 answer
147 views

How would you express 'drained of' in Latin?

I'm trying to translate the phrase 'drained of' in Latin, for example in the sentence 'I have been drained of all my energy'. All of the words for draining which I have found work more in the sense of ...
outisnemo's user avatar
  • 123
4 votes
1 answer
199 views

Difference between vito and caveo

I was reading De Imitatione Christi to get more familiar with the structure of a text in Latin and I notice that the author usually uses the verb caveo whenever referring to 'avoid' or 'beware' (such ...
YetAnotherUsr's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
195 views

Creating place names from Latin verbs?

Latin words like crematorium and vomitorium seem to be made from verb + -torium Is there a pattern to this I can follow for arbitrary verbs? Furor + -torium = furotorium Or Farcio + -torium = ...
AncientSwordRage's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
368 views

Subject-verb agreement

In Hans Oerberg's book Familia Romana you can find this sentence: īnfrā pulmōnēs est iecur et venter (Ch. XI; lines 20-21) - shouldn't it say "sunt iecur et venter". We have two subjects in ...
Dachi Pachulia's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
905 views

What does the word "habe" (habere) mean?

I'm translating the phrase "bonum animum habe". The website that I'm using, https://latin.cactus2000.de/showverb.en.php?verb=habere&form=habe says that it’s an imperative present verb. ...
Hydrolox3552's user avatar
8 votes
3 answers
898 views

Dictionaries always list the Neuter Participle in principal forms, why?

I noticed that the principal forms of verbs always only include the neuter participle form, e.g. vocare - voco, vocavi, vocatum Is there a reason I've never seen the following? vocare - voco, ...
Cyb3rKo's user avatar
  • 616
2 votes
1 answer
111 views

Are these reasonable guesses for unattested verb forms? ἤρισσαν, θεωπρόπεεν

I'm making recordings of grammar drill exercises for the Homeric dialect (example). For verbs, there is a hassle because most verbs are not actually attested in very many forms. Typically I can look ...
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