Skip to main content

Questions tagged [vergilius]

For questions about Publius Vergilius Maro and his work.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
5 votes
2 answers
308 views

Meaning of a present participle in a verse of Vergil's Eclogue 8

I'm reading Vergil's Eclogue 8, 17–42 in the book Beginning Latin Poetry Reader by Gavin Betts and Daniel Franklin. The first verse is (I write only the long vowels macrons): Nāscere, prāēque diem ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,092
5 votes
1 answer
551 views

"Omnia vincit amor, et nos cedamus amori" -- why "et nos" and not "nos et"?

In a comment Sebastian brought to my attention that in Virgil's famous verse: Omnia vincit amor, et nos cedamus amori, the syllable o in amor (or or(?); since according to the cited Wiki article it ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
9 votes
3 answers
391 views

Parsing "oblita carmina"

Vergil wrote (Eclogues IX.51–4), quoted by Draconis in this answer: Omnia fert aetas, animum quoque. Saepe ego longos cantando puerum memini me condere soles. Nunc oblita mihi tot carmina: vox quoque ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
172 views

Why is the subjunctive used in Vergil's Georgics, 3,250?

Vergil's Georgics, book 3, line 250, reads: nonne vides ut tota tremor pertemptet equorum corpora si tantum notas odor attulit auras. Why is the subjunctive mood used here? And what is this ut?
user21669's user avatar
  • 281
3 votes
1 answer
70 views

Is this the correct metric to Virgils Georgics II, 459?

agrícó/las quíbús /ipsá pró/cul dis/cordíbús/ armis Is this correct? I tried to indicate the short syllables with the accents. I would appreciate your answer very much!
ClassisRomana's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
338 views

commentary of "Arma virumque cano"

In Aeneis commentary (left-below) it is written: Male explicant: armatum virum; sed disiungenda sunt haec duo vocabula, ut disiunxit Tasso quum diceret: Canto l'arini pietose e 'l capitano; si vero ...
d_e's user avatar
  • 11.2k
8 votes
2 answers
2k views

Why can "bubo" ("owl") be feminine or masculine?

Why the occurrence of "bubo" in the Virgilius text is an hapax? This text is the only one listed in Lewis & Short with "bubo" being feminine. Usually, it's a masculine noun. So, it is an hapax. ...
Quidam's user avatar
  • 1,796
7 votes
2 answers
161 views

Vergil Book XII, Line 756 | Meter Question

"tum vero exoritur clamor ripaeque lacusque" When you do the meter for this line, if you do the elision it does not work out, having 6 feet and all. So, to make it work what I had to do was not do ...
Ozymandias's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
249 views

Extra initial Aeneid lines in 1662 M. de Marolles version

I have a 1662 version of the Aeneid, with Latin and French on facing pages, with the French having been translated by M. de Marolles, Abbé de Villeloin, [additional book info continues: À Paris, Chez ...
user avatar
3 votes
0 answers
163 views

"Alēctō" or "Allēctō"?

"Alēctō" is the name of one of the Furies, made surprisingly famous in the Harry Potter books. It seems to come straightforwardly from Greek ă- "not" + lēg- "stop" + -tos "[adjective]", so "...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.1k
2 votes
1 answer
761 views

Does the avenger arise from bones or ashes?

A famous quote of Dido's from Aeneid 4.625 is exoriare aliquis nostris ex ossibus ultor of which my preferred poetic translation is Fitzgerald's Rise up from my bones, avenging spirit ...
kingledion's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
2k views

What is the opposite of "aegrescit medendo"?

There is a well-known Latin phrase, aegrescit medendo, which means, "worsens with treatment". I believe it comes from Virgil (correct me if I am wrong). I wanted to know if there is an attested phrase ...
ktm5124's user avatar
  • 12.1k
3 votes
1 answer
82 views

Aeneis instead of "Augusteis"

I've heard that Augustus originally wanted an "Augusteis" from Vergil. I know that in the end Augustus really liked the Aeneis, but is there any known reason why exactly Vergil decided to write an "...
Quacksilber's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
143 views

George Duckworth's Vergilius?

I am reading an essay on Vergil's Aeneid, and there is a citation that says: Does this citation direct to the book Vergilius 4 published in 1940, on page 5-17? If so, I am having trouble finding ...
Unconventional Wisdom's user avatar
9 votes
1 answer
274 views

Negative Future Imperatives

In reading through Book VI of Vergil's Aeneid, I came across the following line: 851 tu regere imperio populos, Romane, memento I believe this is translated as "you, Roman, remember to rule the ...
Sapphira's user avatar
  • 2,093
10 votes
2 answers
341 views

Potentially Ambiguous Subject for a Verb in the Aeneid

Lines 405–407 of Vergil's Aeneid, Book 6, are as follows: Si te nulla movet tantae pietatis imago, at ramum hunc" (aperit ramum qui veste latebat) "agnoscas." Tumida ex ira tum corda ...
Sapphira's user avatar
  • 2,093
9 votes
2 answers
2k views

Translation of Lines 333–336 of Vergil's Aeneid Book 4

Tandem pauca refert: "Ego te, quae plurima fando enumerare vales, numquam, regina, negabo promeritam, nec me meminisse pigebit Elissae dum memor ipse mei, dum spiritus hos regit artus. (4:333&...
Sapphira's user avatar
  • 2,093
14 votes
1 answer
420 views

Translating "Nocte volat caelī mediō"

Line 184 of Vergil's Aeneid, Book IV, begins as follows: Nocte volat caelī mediō Would this be translated as "She of the sky flies in the middle of the night", or "At night she flies in the middle ...
Sapphira's user avatar
  • 2,093
8 votes
2 answers
176 views

A type of subordinating construction governing the dative?

Here is a line from Aeneid 6:563, along with my gloss of the parts of speech and the formal inflectional categories and proposed free translation. nulli fas casto sceleratum insistere ...
user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
387 views

Can a supine verb have arguments?

Consider the following line from the Aeneid, Book VI: nec credere quivi hunc tantum tibi me discessu ferre dolorem. Context: Aeneas has traveled into the underworld, and bumps into Dido, who he ...
user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
125 views

Are there historical characters in Aeneis?

Are any of the characters in the main timeline of Aeneis (or Aeneid) historical, that is, known or strongly believed to have really existed? I want to exclude prophecies of later eras in Roman history....
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
3 answers
587 views

Length of i in Vergilius' "ferentis"

In the famous line "quicquid id est timeo Danaos et dona ferentis" Vergilius uses an older plural accusative form ferentis instead of ferentes. (It is unimportant here whether quicquid or quidquid is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
174 views

Are Iulus and Iulius related?

Is there an etymological (and hence historical) relation between Aeneas's son Iulus and Iulius Caesar? Virgil was obviously trying to establish a conexion of blood, be it mythological, between the ...
Cerberus's user avatar
  • 20.1k
5 votes
1 answer
242 views

Fifth spondee in Aeneis I.690

I ran into this hexameter verse by Vergilius when researching for an answer to another question: exuit, et gressu gaudens incedit Iuli. (Aeneis I.690) The only way I seem to able to scan this ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
16 votes
1 answer
1k views

Omnia vincit amor: vincere or vincire?

The phrase omnia vincit amor (from Vergilius' tenth Ecloga; see full text in Latin and English) is typically translated as "love conquers everything". However, vincit can come from either vincere (to ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
11 votes
2 answers
385 views

Can Latin "inde" introduce a temporal clause?

Lines one and two of book 2 of Vergil's Aeneid sparked this question: Conticuere omnes intentique ora tenebant inde toro pater Aeneas sic orsus ab alto: I had two interpretations. My first ...
Bounce's user avatar
  • 113
11 votes
2 answers
720 views

Is -um (instead of -ōrum) a typical genitive plural ending outside of poetry?

I understand that Vergil often uses the -um genitive plural ending for some second declension nouns, instead of -ōrum. For example: huc delecta virum sortiti corpora furtim (Aeneid, Book II, line ...
Nathaniel is protesting's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
145 views

Why does Parthenope refer to Naples?

Vergil's tomb bears the inscription: Mantua me genuit; Calabri rapuere; tenet nunc Parthenope; cecini Pascua, rura, duces. Why does "Parthenope" refer to Naples?
J. Nakaso's user avatar
13 votes
1 answer
129 views

Why "impressa" in Æneid IV.659–60?

So Dido's almost finished her long, drawn-out suicide scene, and we get the lines Dīxit, et ōs impressa torō, "Moriēmur inultae, sed moriāmur," ait. It seems like impressa is being used here as ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.6k
10 votes
1 answer
209 views

Allecto's cerulean hair in *Æneid* VII.346-7

In VII.346-7 of the Æneid, when Juno sics Allecto on Amata, we have Hic dea cæruleís únum dé crínibus anguem Conjicit inque sinum præcordia ad intima subdit. Allecto's … blue hair? Hunh?...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.6k