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Questions tagged [vergilius]

For questions about Publius Vergilius Maro and his work.

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Does the avenger arise from bones or ashes?

A famous quote of Dido's from Aeneid 4.625 is exoriare aliquis nostris ex ossibus ultor of which my preferred poetic translation is Fitzgerald's Rise up from my bones, avenging spirit ...
3
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1answer
617 views

What is the opposite of “aegrescit medendo”?

There is a well-known Latin phrase, aegrescit medendo, which means, "worsens with treatment". I believe it comes from Virgil (correct me if I am wrong). I wanted to know if there is an attested phrase ...
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Aeneis instead of “Augusteis”

I've heard that Augustus originally wanted an "Augusteis" from Vergil. I know that in the end Augustus really liked the Aeneis, but is there any known reason why exactly Vergil decided to write an "...
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George Duckworth's Vergilius?

I am reading an essay on Vergil's Aeneid, and there is a citation that says: Does this citation direct to the book Vergilius 4 published in 1940, on page 5-17? If so, I am having trouble finding ...
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Negative Future Imperatives

In reading through Book VI of Vergil's Aeneid, I came across the following line: 851 tu regere imperio populos, Romane, memento I believe this is translated as "you, Roman, remember to rule the ...
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220 views

Translating “Nocte volat caelī mediō”

Line 184 of Vergil's Aeneid, Book IV, begins as follows: Nocte volat caelī mediō Would this be translated as "She of the sky flies in the middle of the night", or "At night she flies in the middle ...
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2answers
104 views

A type of subordinating construction governing the dative?

Here is a line from Aeneid 6:563, along with my gloss of the parts of speech and the formal inflectional categories and proposed free translation. nulli fas casto sceleratum insistere ...
11
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2answers
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Can a supine verb have arguments?

Consider the following line from the Aeneid, Book VI: nec credere quivi hunc tantum tibi me discessu ferre dolorem. Context: Aeneas has traveled into the underworld, and bumps into Dido, who he ...
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Are there historical characters in Aeneis?

Are any of the characters in the main timeline of Aeneis (or Aeneid) historical, that is, known or strongly believed to have really existed? I want to exclude prophecies of later eras in Roman history....
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246 views

Length of i in Vergilius' “ferentis”

In the famous line "quicquid id est timeo Danaos et dona ferentis" Vergilius uses an older plural accusative form ferentis instead of ferentes. (It is unimportant here whether quicquid or quidquid is ...
8
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Are Iulus and Iulius related?

Is there an etymological (and hence historical) relation between Aeneas's son Iulus and Iulius Caesar? Virgil was obviously trying to establish a conexion of blood, be it mythological, between the ...
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Fifth spondee in Aeneis I.690

I ran into this hexameter verse by Vergilius when researching for an answer to another question: exuit, et gressu gaudens incedit Iuli. (Aeneis I.690) The only way I seem to able to scan this ...
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1answer
300 views

Omnia vincit amor: vincere or vincire?

The phrase omnia vincit amor (from Vergilius' tenth Ecloga; see full text in Latin and English) is typically translated as "love conquers everything". However, vincit can come from either vincere (to ...
11
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2answers
105 views

Can Latin “inde” introduce a temporal clause?

Lines one and two of book 2 of Vergil's Aeneid sparked this question: Conticuere omnes intentique ora tenebant inde toro pater Aeneas sic orsus ab alto: I had two interpretations. My first ...
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2answers
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Is -um (instead of -ōrum) a typical genitive plural ending outside of poetry?

I understand that Vergil often uses the -um genitive plural ending for some second declension nouns, instead of -ōrum. For example: huc delecta virum sortiti corpora furtim (Aeneid, Book II, line ...
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Why does Parthenope refer to Naples?

Vergil's tomb bears the inscription: Mantua me genuit; Calabri rapuere; tenet nunc Parthenope; cecini Pascua, rura, duces. Why does "Parthenope" refer to Naples?
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Why “impressa” in Æneid IV.659–60?

So Dido's almost finished her long, drawn-out suicide scene, and we get the lines Dīxit, et ōs impressa torō, "Moriēmur inultae, sed moriāmur," ait. It seems like impressa is being used here as ...
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Allecto's cerulean hair in *Æneid* VII.346-7

In VII.346-7 of the Æneid, when Juno sics Allecto on Amata, we have Hic dea cæruleís únum dé crínibus anguem Conjicit inque sinum præcordia ad intima subdit. Allecto's … blue hair? Hunh?...