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Questions tagged [vulgata]

Questions about the language used in the Vulgate (or Vulgata), a late fourth-century translation of the Bible.

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5
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1answer
61 views

Translating part of the preface of the Clementine Vulgate

I wanted eliminate all acronyms from my digital copy of the Clementine Vulgate, when I came across this acronym: S.R.E, which I'm pretty sure it means Sancta Romana Ecclesia (Holy Church of Rome). Now,...
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How do you understand the gerunds in miserando atque eligendo? [duplicate]

Pope Francis's coat of arms has the phrase miserando atque eligendo. My knowledge of Latin grammar has faded, but if I recall correctly, this phrase uses two gerunds. I think one translation is "by ...
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66 views

Unde habemus te, bone juvenis?

This phrase can be found in Tobit 5:6, in the Vulgata: Et ignorans quod angelus Dei esset, salutavit eum, et dixit : Unde te habemus, bone juvenis? The accompanying English translation reads: ...
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38 views

Is this an accurate way to translate “addiditque sermo mihi est ad te cui ait loquere et ille”

addiditque sermo mihi est ad te cui ait loquere et ille 1 Kings 2:14 I'm attempting to use it as a formal Latin epigraph for a poem and want to know, if I were to translate it as a footnote or ...
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77 views

Is the Latin word verenda a noun? If so, which lexical root it has?

Is the Latin word verenda a noun? If so, which lexical root does it have? Deu.25:11: "Si habuerint inter se jurgium viri duo, et unus contra alterum rixari coeperit, volensque uxor alterius eruere ...
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155 views

What would be a literal translation of “Satan”?

In Ancient Greek, the Hebrew word שָׂטָן (satan, "adversary") is sometimes translated as διάβολος (diábolos, "betrayer") and sometimes adapted as Σατανᾶς (Satanâs). In Latin, it seems like there ...
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145 views

Understanding “audieritis” in Psalm 94

Consider the following excerpt from Psalm 94 in the Vulgate. Hódie, si vocem eius audiéritis, nolíte obduráre corda vestra, sicut in exacerbatióne secúndum diem tentatiónis in desérto: ubi ...
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93 views

Understanding the use of “regnavit”

Regnavit is the third-person singular perfect active indicative of rēgnō (Wiktionary) Now, many times this word translated as if present, regnat, which is puzzling. For example, consider Psalm ...
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Did “benedicere” ever mean “to blaspheme”?

I was struck by some verses in Chapter 21 of 3 Regum, Vulgata. This tells the story of Naboth, an Israelite who owned a vineyard which was adjacent to the palace of the Israeli King, Achab. Naboth ...
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On the use (or not) of genitive in some verses of the Vulgata

I'm a bit puzzled with some verses of the Vulgata, regarding the use or not of genitive. Consider 3 Regnum (1 Kings in non LXX-based bibles). Verses 13-15 in Chapter 10 go as follows: [13] Rex ...
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60 views

Do we ever see “in saeculo saeculorum”?

Recently, luchonacho asked about the phrase in saecula saeculōrum: literally, "into the lifetimes of the lifetimes". It's kind of a weird phrase, for multiple reasons. However, I'd always thought the ...
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258 views

On the literal meaning of “in saecula saeculorum”

Literally, this phrase (found originally in the New Testament of the Vulgata) is translated as "into [the] ages of [the] ages". It's supposed to be an expression of eternity, and it's commonly ...
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141 views

“Deus meus”, aut “Deus mī”?

I was taught that meus had a special irregular vocative, mī. (So "my father" in the vocative would be pater mī, not pater meus.) However, there's a line that shows up a few times in the Vulgate that ...
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146 views

When to omit a preposition?

Consider 2 Kings, 16:1 in the Vulgate (2 Samuel in modern bibles): Cumque David transisset paululum montis verticem, apparuit Siba puer Miphiboseth in occursum ejus, cum duobus asinis, qui onerati ...
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564 views

Why “dilatasti” instead of “dilatavisti” in Psalm 4:2?

(Psalm 4:2) cum invocarem exaudivit me Deus iustitiae meae in tribulatione dilatasti mihi miserere mei et exaudi orationem meam When I called upon him, the God of my justice heard me: when I was ...
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763 views

Understanding “jam nunc”

The expression (idiom?) jam nunc appears several times in the Vulgata. So far I've seen two common translations. One is that of "now presently". For instance, Exodus 9:19: (Latin) Mitte ergo jam ...
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483 views

Case of “leo” in Judges 14:5

Judges 14:5 in the Vulgata reads: Descendit itaque Samson cum patre suo et matre in Thamnatha. Cumque venissent ad vineas oppidi, apparuit catulus leonis saevus, et rugiens, et occurrit ei. I don'...
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63 views

How to resolve ambiguities with the infinitive

In the Vulgata, Titus 3:8 reads as follows: Fidelis sermo est: et de his volo te confirmare: ut curent bonis operibus præesse qui credunt Deo. Hæc sunt bona, et utilia hominibus. In particular, ...
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440 views

Why is the accusative not used in Judges 5:23?

This verse reads: Maledicite terrae Meroz, dixit angelus Domini : maledicite habitatoribus ejus, quia non venerunt ad auxilium Domini, in adjutorium fortissimorum ejus. The context is that of ...
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Why is dignetur used as if it were in the active voice?

For 2 Thessalonians 1:11, the Vulgata has the following: In quo etiam oramus semper pro vobis: ut dignetur vos vocatione sua Deus nosteret impleat omnem voluntatem bonitatis, et opus fidei in ...
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208 views

Shouldn't “decursus” be accusative in Psalm 1:3?

(Psalm 1:3, Clementine Vulgate) Et erit tamquam lignum quod plantatum est secus decursus aquarum, quod fructum suum dabit in tempore suo: et folium ejus non defluet; et omnia quæcumque faciet ...
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When did the infinitive of purpose arise?

In Classical Latin, purpose would normally be expressed with ut, or ad with a gerund, or a supine with a verb of motion, or numerous other ways. However, in later and vulgar Latin (most notably the ...
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Why is the ablative used here instead of the genitive

Mark 1:6 starts with Et erat Joannes vestitus pilis cameli... Which is translated as "John was clothed with camel's hairs...." Why is it pilis instead of pilorum? Shouldn't pilis use genitive ...
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100 views

Regarding the mode of “terram” in Deuteronomy 28:38

Deuteronomy 28:38 reads: Sementem multam jacies in terram, et modicum congregabis: quia locustæ devorabunt omnia. I think the first phrase before the comma has the following structure (but ...
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Why is an accusative mode needed?

Consider Deuteronomy 28:30, in the Vulgata: Uxorem accipias, et alius dormiat cum ea. Domum ædifices, et non habites in ea. Plantes vineam, et non vindemies eam. So uxorem, domum, vineam, and eam ...
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Is “nolī esse” grammatical?

In the Vatican's Nova Vulgata, Ecclesiastes 7:16-17 reads as follows: Noli esse nimis iustus neque sapiens supra modum! Cur te perdere vis? Ne agas nimis impie et noli esse stultus! Cur ...
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115 views

Is this translation of Numbers 5:3 from the Vulgate correct?

The Vulgata, in Numbers 5:2-3, says: [2] Praecipe filiis Israel, ut ejiciant de castris omnem leprosum, et qui semine fluit, pollutusque est super mortuo: [3] tam masculum quam feminam ejicite de ...
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When does si mean “that”?

In the Vulgate (Acts 26:22-23), I came across the following: ...nihil extra dicens quam ea quæ prophetæ locuti sunt futura esse, et Moyses, si passibilis Christus, si primus ex resurrectione ...
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276 views

habitabat = dwelt?

Estne hic error translationis? Genesis 25:11 (Vulgata) dicit: et post obitum illius benedixit Deus Isaac filio eius qui habitabat iuxta puteum nomine Viventis et videntis. Anglice autem (Douay ...
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3answers
491 views

Elevatis oculis?

In the Sixto-Clementine Vulgate, Genesis 22:4 reads: die autem tertio, elevatis oculis, vidit locum procul The Douay-Rheims translates: And on the third day, lifting up his eyes, he saw the ...
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211 views

Literal translation of Vulgate

I am looking for the most literal translation possible of any Latin bible, either to English or Spanish. I want to use it to improve my Latin by reading both simultaneously. I know the Douay-Rheims ...
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274 views

Translation of Ps 16(15), 6 (Vulgata)

Verse in question is as follows: Funes ceciderunt mihi in praeclaris; etenim haereditas mea praeclara est mihi. It would seem to me that meaning is something like this: Funes: ropes, bonds, ...
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Translation of Greek “ἅπτω” in John 20:17

English versions of John 20:17 show two types of accounts: Jesus said to her, “Do not cling to me, for I have not yet ascended to the Father and Jesus says to her, "Do not touch me, for not yet ...
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Which grammatical format is the double-perfect system as found in the Vulgate?

Question: Please show me a grammar resource that explains what the following construction is: John 1:24 "missi fuerant" John 1:40 "secuti fuerant" John 2:10 "inebriati fuerint" John 3:3 "natus fuerit"...
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105 views

Reading a snippet of 15th century handwriting in Latin

The Lilly library has a Gutenberg bible on display and the page that it is open to varies. This week the page had a marginal comment in it, which is unusual for this particular copy, and I was hoping ...
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123 views

“Super aquam refectionis educavit me…”

Psalm 22 includes this phrase, which both my daughter and I find curious because of the use of "super". Here it is with a little more context: Dominus regit me, et nihil mihi deerit: in loco ...
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New testament Romans 2:8 - Why is nominative used instead of accusative like the previous verse?

See the Vatican version here: 6 qui reddet unicuique secundum opera eius: 7 his quidem, qui secundum patientiam boni operis gloriam et honorem et incorruptionem quaerunt, vitam aeternam; ...
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224 views

Why are “esurivi” and “sitivi” used in perfect, but “hospes eram” in imperfect in the same context?

There is a fragment of Gospel of Matthew (in Vulgata): (...), esurivi enim et dedistis mihi manducare, sitivi et dedistis mihi bibere, hospes eram et collegistis me (...) My question is: Why ...
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403 views

Why “idolatria” instead of “idololatria”?

Although the idea of idolatry has been present for a long time, I believe St. Paul is the first to use the term εἰδωλολατρία, e.g. Gal 5:20. (Corrections welcome!) Two surprises come when we look at ...
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398 views

What's it called when a verb shares the same root as its object or modifier?

I have noticed in both Greek and Latin that sometimes a verb shares the same root as its object or modifier. This construction looks funny to me as an English speaker, as we don't often encounter this ...
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In Romans 3:22, why did Jerome prefer to use crēdunt rather than fīdunt?

The Greek text of the Textus Receptus (1550) states, ΚΒʹ δικαιοσύνη δὲ θεοῦ διὰ πίστεως Ἰησοῦ Χριστοῦ εἰς πάντας καὶ ἐπὶ πάντας τοὺς πιστεύοντας οὐ γάρ ἐστιν διαστολή TR, 1550 which Jerome ...
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The Latin word “Have” rather than “Ave” as a translation of the Greek word Χαῖρε?

According to BlueLetterBible, the Latin Vulgate translation of Matthew 26:49 states, The Greek text from the Textus Receptus states, ΜΘʹ καὶ εὐθέως προσελθὼν τῷ Ἰησοῦ εἶπεν Χαῖρε ῥαββί καὶ ...
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227 views

What does a “si” clause followed by a “nisi” clause mean?

In the Vulgate Bible, I came across this sentence. Vivit Dominus Deus Israel, in cuius conspectu sto, si erit annis his ros et pluvia, nisi iuxta oris mei verba. [As] the Lord God of Israel ...
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283 views

What's the logic behind “eritque Israel in proverbium” (Vulgate bible)

In the Vulgate bible, I encountered the sentence, Eritque Israel in proverbium, et in fabulam cunctis populis. And Israel will be a proverb, and a story for all people. (1 Kings 9:7) I'm ...
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111 views

Why is “repetunt” 3rd pl active in Luke 12:20 (Vulgate)?

I was reading today's gospel from the Roman calendar and noticed this in Luke 12:20: dixit autem illi Deus stulte hac nocte animam tuam repetunt a te quae autem parasti cuius erunt I was struck by ...
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220 views

Use of the gerund in the Vulgate bible

I was reading Luke 10:25 in the Vulgate bible, trying my best to translate as literally as possible. But I found it hard to translate the question that the expert of law (legisperitus) poses. (...
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“Deus tu conversus vivificabis nos…”

This verse from Psalm lxxxiv: Deus tu conversus vivificabis nos: et plebs tua laetabitur in te. Appears in the Parvum Officium of the BVM (and other liturgical prayers that currently escape my ...
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166 views

Why did Hieronymus choose to use Latin tenses that don't exist in Hebrew when translating for the Vulgata?

Nisi Dominus ædificaverit domum, in vanum laboraverunt qui ædificant eam. [psalm 126:1] I am pretty sure that classical Hebrew has no future perfect tense, so how did Jerome arrive at his ...
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212 views

Is “ambulabat” a present participle in the imperfect?

This passage is from Matthaeus 14:29 of the Latin Vulgate. I've included much of the surrounding text because the lack of punctuation makes it difficult for me to distinguish the sentence structure. ...
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540 views

Why is the passive participle in Matthew 10:1 rendered as active in English?

I'm a little confused by the clause that begins Matthew 10: 10:1 Et convocatis duodecim discipulis suis, dedit illis potestatem spirituum immundorum, ut ejicerent eos, et curarent omnem languorem,...