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Questions tagged [vulgata]

Questions about the language used in the Vulgate (or Vulgata), a late fourth-century translation of the Bible.

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What does "quod" refer to in Vulgate in Matthew 26:75?

In Vulgate: Et recordatus est Petrus verbi Jesu, quod dixerat : Priusquam gallus cantet, ter me negabis. Et egressus foras, flevit amare. https://www.bible.com/bible/823/MAT.26.75 What does "...
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In Vulgate in Matthew 26:29, is "bibam" present subjunctive or future indicative?

In Vulgate: Dico autem vobis : non bibam amodo de hoc genimine vitis usque in diem illum, cum illud bibam vobiscum novum in regno Patris mei. https://www.bible.com/bible/823/MAT.26.29 So, is "...
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3 votes
1 answer
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What version of the Vulgate is this?

I was reading Psalm 95 in the Vulgate using my BlueLetterBible app: [Vulgate 94:1] venite laudemus Dominum iubilemus petrae Iesu nostro I was quite surprised to see the word "Iesu". I ...
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How was the name Abraham pronounced in Jerome's Vulgate Latin?

In Jerome's Vulgate translation of the Bible, the name of the patriarch is spelled Abraham, however, Modern Hebrew pronounces this with a /β/ sound (Avraham). I'm trying to figure out if Jerome wrote ...
Dan's user avatar
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In Vulgate in Ecclesiastes 2:16, why does it say "et futura tempora oblivione *cuncta* pariter operient" (neuter accusative plural) and not "cunctos"?

In Vulgate in Ecclesiastes 2:16, it says "...et futura tempora oblivione cuncta pariter operient...". I guess that's supposed to mean "...and the future times will cover entire them by ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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Ecclesiastes 9:5 "...quia oblivioni tradita est *memoria eorum*." - "memory containing them" or "memory they posessed in their heads"?

In the Vulgate in Ecclesiastes 9:5, it says "...quia oblivioni tradita est memoria eorum.". Does that mean "...because the memory containing them has been given to oblivion." or ...
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In Vulgate in Apocalypsis 20:4, why does it say "et regnaverunt cum Christo mille *annis*" (ablative?), rather than "...annos" (accusative)?

In Vulgate in Apocalypsis 20:4, why does it say "et regnaverunt cum Christo mille annis" (ablative? Or is it dative?), rather than "et regnaverunt cum Christo mille annos" (...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
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Ranking of the Books of the Nova Vulgata by difficulty

Salvete omnes, I want to try my hand on the Nova Vulgata, but I wanted to do so deliberately and increasing the difficulty gradually so I can use it as comprehensible input. Could anyone here give me ...
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What is the gender of the word "Haec" in Latin?

"post haec in terris visus est et cum hominibus conversatus est" I have no knowledge of Latin language. This is a verse from the Latin Vulagate bible. Most translations have this verse ...
Language Enthusiast's user avatar
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Can "to him(self)" be an implied phrase for dative or ablative case? E.g., Acts 20:1

Consider the Vulgate of Acts 20:1: Postquam autem cessavit tumultus, vocatis Paulus discipulis, et exhortatus eos, valedixit, et profectus est ut iret in Macedoniam. The Douay-Rheims renders this as:...
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Why is domui dative in 1 Timothy 3:4?

1 Tim 3:4 in the vulgate is: suae domui bene praepositum: filios habentem subditos cum omni castitate The DRC1752 renders this into English as: One that ruleth well his own house, having his ...
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Are plural Latin participles sometimes translated singular? E.g., "peregratis" in Acts 19:1

Acts 19:1 in the Vulgate is: Factum est autem cum Apollo esset Corinthi, ut Paulus peragratis superioribus partibus veniret Ephesum, et inveniret quosdam discipulos If I'm parsing peregratis ...
Josh's user avatar
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regem Balæ, ipsa est Segor

I’m a bit stumped about why in the phrase in the question title (Vulgate, Gen. 14:2), it’s ipsa and not ipse. What is the feminine noun to which ipsa refers? inirent bellum contra Bara regem ...
D. A. Hosek's user avatar
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Non prævalebunt adversus/adversum eam

After several years, a Bible verse I thought I knew well just blew my mind. (Well, they sometimes do, but not in the grammatical sense.) Namely, Mt 16:18 says, And so I say to you, you are Peter, and ...
Rafael's user avatar
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Does the verb eruo mean to rescue or deliver?

I'm reading Psalm 42 verse 1 from the Vulgate Bible. Here is the translation on vulgata.net: Psalmus 42:1 Psalmus David. Judica me, Deus, et discerne causam meam de gente non sancta, ab homine iniquo ...
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Why ipsa and not ipsae in Psalms 42:3?

Psalms 42:3 in the Vulgate has: Emitte lucem tuam et veritatem tuam. Ipsa me deduxerunt... Why is it ipsa and not ipsae?
John White's user avatar
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"Odoratus est" in Genesis 8:21

Genesis 8:21 says "Odōrātusque est Dominus odōrem suāvitātis". What is "odoratus est"? It looks like the perfect passive participle of "odoro", but that doesn't make ...
quq's user avatar
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In Psalmi 102:2 in Vulgate, it says "et noli oblivisci _omnes retributiones_ ejus.". Shouldn't it be genitive (_omnium retributionium_) there?

In Psalmi 102:2 in Vulgate, it says "et noli oblivisci omnes retributiones ejus.". Shouldn't it be genitive (omnium retributionium) there? I mean, "oblivisci" (to forget) goes with ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
6 votes
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Does "cervus" mean "deer" or "wild goat" (in Psalmi 104:18)?

In Vulgate, in Psalmi 104:18, it says: Montes excelsi cervis, petra refugium herinaciis. I thought cervus meant deer, but the New International Version translates this verse as: The high mountains ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
4 votes
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Is "dante" a participle in Ps 103:28

What parts of the verb are dante and aperiente in Ps 103:28 (Vulgate)? dante te illis colligent aperiente te manum tuam omnia implebuntur bonitate. My guess is the ablative of the present participle (...
user558840's user avatar
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2 answers
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What exactly do "ut" and "quid" mean in "Deus meus, ut quid dereliquisti me?" ("My God, why have you forsaken me?")?

"Ut quid" there is usually translated as "why", but I know the usual word for "why" is "cur". So, why the weird phrasing? I can kind of see how "ut quid&...
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201 views

inter me et inter terram (Genesis 9:13)

As I continue to work through the Vulgate (ridiculously slowly), I'm looking at Gen. 9:13) where Jerome renders the text as inter me et inter terram. Is this repetition of the preposition inter ...
D. A. Hosek's user avatar
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1 answer
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Translating "To know God, to express the Word"

I'm working on an insignia design project. The insignia has a Latin translation of the motto To know God, to express the Word. I paid for a Latin translation service and they gave me this result Ad ...
Trindaz's user avatar
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Gen. 1:20 is reptile ablative?

In Genesis 1:20 in the Vulgate: Dixit etiam Deus : Producant aquae reptile animae viventis, et volatile super terram sub firmamento caeli. why is it not reptiles animas?
Stephen Perencevich's user avatar
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"Lead us not into temptation" or "put us not to the test"?

I have a follow-up to this question which has two parts2 concerning the phrase, "Et ne nos inducas in temptationem." To me it seems that the primary meaning of the English word "...
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Why is "Gavisus sum" translated "now I rejoice" instead of "I rejoiced"?

In the vulgate, Philippians 4:10 begins with the following: Gavisus sum autem in Domino vehementer The Douay-Rheims translates this: Now I rejoice in the Lord exceedingly I'm having trouble ...
Josh's user avatar
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14 votes
3 answers
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In Judith in Vulgate, why does Jerome transliterate the name "Arphaxad" with 'ph', but he transliterates "Holofernes" with an 'f'?

In Judith in Vulgate, why does Jerome transliterate the name "Arphaxad" with 'ph', but he transliterates "Holofernes" with an 'f'? By the time of Jerome, both 'f' and 'ph' were the ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
11 votes
3 answers
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Parsing "quae cum audisset"

I'm having trouble parsing the phrase "quae cum audisset," which I've seen translated as "when [subject] heard" or "and when [subject] heard" in the latin vulgate. For ...
Josh's user avatar
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7 votes
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Why is SoS 8.5 ‘dē dēsertō’ not interpreted as ‘from the forsaken’?

Sources and translations Vulgate 8.5 opens with this passages: Quæ est ista quæ ascendit dē dēsertō, dēliciīs affluēns,  innīxa super dīlēctum suum? This is rendered in the 2011 translation to ...
Canned Man's user avatar
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5 votes
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How to translate "plena die" in English?

The context is the Nova Vulgata translation of Hosea 4:5: Et corrues plena die, et corruet etiam propheta tecum nocte; et perdam matrem tuam. How would I translate the phrase, plena die, into English? ...
Matthew Dunn's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
482 views

In Matthew 27, why does the Vulgate call the graves of people who were resurrected along with Jesus "monumentum", but Jesus's grave "sepulchrum"?

In Matthew 27, why does the Vulgate call the graves of people who were resurrected along with Jesus "monumentum", but Jesus's grave "sepulchrum"? Matthew 27:53 says, in Vulgate: ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
723 views

In Vulgate Lk 22: 62, "Et egressus foras Petrus flevit amare.", it says. How to understand "flevit amare"?

I know "flevit" means "wept" and "amare" means "to love", but the Greek text is "ἔκλαυσεν πικρῶς", which means "wept bitterly". If I parse ...
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recordor + genitive?

In the Vulgate, Gen 8:1, we have Recordatus autem Deus Noë, cunctorumque animantium, et omnium jumentorum, quæ erant cum eo in arca, adduxit spiritum super terram, et immunitæ sunt aquæ. I would ...
D. A. Hosek's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
533 views

In Vulgate, Matthaeus 4:23, it says "et prædicans Evangelium regni". Shouldn't it be "regno" (dative) rather than "regni" (genitive)?

In Vulgate, Matthaeus 4:23, it says "et prædicans Evangelium regni". Shouldn't it be "regno" (dative) rather than "regni" (genitive)? He was talking the gospel TO the ...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
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What exactly does "incipientem" mean in this phrase?

Salvete, From the Vulgate, Acts 23:27: 27 virum hunc conprehensum a Iudaeis et incipientem interfici ab eis superveniens cum exercitu eripui cognito quia Romanus est "This man, being taken by ...
Paulus Filius Rogeri's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
660 views

Vulgate Latin: usque ad pecus

St Jerome has in Gen 7:23, “ab homine usque ad pecus” but pecus is nominative (or perhaps genitive if the word is pecu) and not accusative. Am I misunderstanding something here?
D. A. Hosek's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
135 views

Why subjunctive in "Cumque transissent septem dies..."

I'm working my way through the Vulgate and in Genesis 7:10, the text is: cumque transissent septem dies aquae diluvii inundaverunt super terram transissent here is third-person plural pluperfect ...
D. A. Hosek's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
6k views

What is the exact literal translation of "Et ne nos inducas in tentationem, sed libera nos a malo."?

What is the literal translation of the above sentence in English?
Tobey's user avatar
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1 answer
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How do you translate this verse?

I am reading John 1:27, and I'd like to know how do you make sense of cuius in this verse, and what does corrigiam mean? Ipse est qui post me venturus est, qui ante me factus est: cujus ego non ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
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Why does the NASB translate this verse this way?

The NASB translates ante me factus est in Jn 1:15 as "has a higher rank than I". How does the NASB get this meaning for this phrase? I personally would translate this phrase as "was made before me" ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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What does "his" mean in this verse?

In John 1:12 there's the word his. What does this word mean in this context? 12 Quotquot autem receperunt eum, dedit eis potestatem filios Dei fieri, his qui credunt in nomine ejus: But as ...
ktm5124's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
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A Completed Action in the Mind OR Indirect Speech?

There are currently two theories (of which I am aware) to explain the use of the perfect subjunctive, in examples from the Latin Vulgate, included in brianpck's answer to Q: Memento quod <...
tony's user avatar
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2 votes
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(Informal) Indirect Speech

In Q: Memento quod <subjunctive> brianpck cited five examples from the Latin Vulgate (Fourth Century). Taking one of these: "memento quod et ipse servieris in Aegypto et eduxerit te inde ...
tony's user avatar
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8 votes
3 answers
503 views

Is this Latin statement idiomatic? (Can't quite link it to the English translation)

Consider the Bible verse 1 Corinthians 1:25. There are varied English translations of this verse (see here). The two most common are: For the foolishness of God is wiser than men, and the weakness of ...
luchonacho's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
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Why is the proper name Apollos not declined in the Vulgate

Saint Apollos was a companion of Saint Paul mentioned several times in the New Testament. In the Latin Vulgate, his name is transliterated as an indeclinable noun, Apollo. My question is, why was his ...
Figulus's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
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Is "whatever you say, do" an accurate translation of "quodcumque dixerit facite"?

Background: The Latin phrase, quodcumque dixerit vobis facite, taken from John 2:5 of the Vulgate, translates to, Whatsoever he shall say to you, do ye, according to the Douay-Rheims ...
alderman's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
245 views

Gen 1:28 only animals that move or all living beings?

The book of Genesis, 1:28 reads: Crescite et multiplicamini et replete terram et subicite eam et dominamini piscibus maris et volatilibus caeli et universis animantibus, quae moventur super terram ...
Rafael's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
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Understanding the grammar of "non ipsi nos" in Psalm 99

(Psalm 99:3) Scitóte quóniam Dóminus ipse est Deus: * ipse fecit nos, et non ipsi nos. (Douay Rheims) Know ye that the Lord he is God: * he made us, and not we ourselves. How exactly does one parse &...
Pascal's Wager's user avatar
8 votes
1 answer
168 views

Why "decorem indutus est" instead of "decore indutus est"?

Psalm 92 v. 1 Dóminus regnávit, decórem indútus est: * indútus est Dóminus fortitúdinem, et præcínxit se. The Lord hath reigned, he is clothed with beauty: * the Lord is clothed with strength, and ...
Pascal's Wager's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
286 views

Trouble transcribing a line of Latin from Codex Claromontanus

I am trying to transcribe Hebrews 6 from Codex Claromontanus, but am unable to decipher two lines from verse 1: Source: https://gallica.bnf.fr/ark:/12148/btv1b84683111/f907.item (see halfway down the ...
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