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Questions tagged [grammar-identification]

Use this tag when asking about a grammatical structure you cannot name and want explained.

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What does "quod" refer to in Vulgate in Matthew 26:75?

In Vulgate: Et recordatus est Petrus verbi Jesu, quod dixerat : Priusquam gallus cantet, ter me negabis. Et egressus foras, flevit amare. https://www.bible.com/bible/823/MAT.26.75 What does "...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
162 views

What does "Tris dies" mean in "Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles"?

From Ritchie's Fabulae Faciles: Tris dies per totam insulam matrem quaerebat; tandem quarto die ad templum Dianae pervenit. http://www.thelatinlibrary.com/ritchie.html What does "Tris dies"...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
346 views

Is there any potential ambiguity in this phrase from Xenophon?

I'm (still) reading Ανάβασις by Ξενοφών. I came across this sentence: οἱ μὲν οὖν πρῶτοι ὅμως τρόπῳ τινὶ ἐστρατοπεδεύσαντο, οἱ δὲ ὕστεροι σκοταῖοι προσιόντες ὡς ἐτύγχανον ἕκαστοι ηὐλίζοντο, καὶ ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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Reason for ablative case in "praesidioque decorique parentibus esse"

In Lucretius II 641–643 "aut quia significant divam praedicere ut armis ac virtute velint patriam defendere terram praesidioque parent decorique parentibus esse." I am not very comfortable ...
Arnaud Mégret's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
77 views

What is this grammar and how should I interpret this?

εἰσὶν δὲ οὗτοι οἱ οὐδὲν ἄλλο οἰόμενοι εἶναι ἢ οὗ ἂν δύνωνται ἀπρὶξ τοῖν χεροῖν λαβέσθαι, πράξεις δὲ καὶ γενέσεις καὶ πᾶν τὸ ἀόρατον οὐκ ἀποδεχόμενοι ὡς ἐν οὐσίας μέρει. I don't understand the bold ...
user21669's user avatar
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Absurdum est, affirmare, re credendum esse non judici

I have trouble understanding the grammar of this sentence, especially re: Absurdum est, affirmare, re credendum esse non judici. It is absurd to affirm, that we must not give credit to a judge. ...
richardIII's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
227 views

Does studeo take the dative?

In their Latin course, Duolingo likes to use the post-classical meaning of studeo of "to study". Does this meaning usually take a dative rather than using an accusative? The course regularly ...
Adam's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
525 views

Grammar of motto "Sancte et Sapiente"

The motto of King's College is "Sancte et Sapiente", which is translated "With Holiness and Wisdom". Am I correct in understanding that two of the three words are adverbs, so a ...
Dan R.'s user avatar
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What is μέγεθος referring to in Jewish War 3.4

In the Jewish War chapter 3.4, it says: μόνον [οὖν] εὑρίσκει Οὐεσπασιανὸν ταῖς χρείαις ἀναλογοῦντα καὶ τηλικούτου πολέμου μέγεθος ἀναδέξασθαι δυνάμενον "He found only Vespasian a match for the ...
greglo's user avatar
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1 vote
3 answers
241 views

Deceptum is the ablative singular?

I saw a paradigm of the adjective deceptus -a -um (which is the participle of decipio) in which the neuter single ablative form is deceptum rather than decepto as we would expect. So, if this is true, ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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4 votes
0 answers
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Is it permissible to use "dum" with the pluperfect subjunctive?

Is it ever permissible to use dum with the pluperfect subjunctive? Here is an example of this construction from Victor of Vita's Historia persecutionis Africanae provinciae: qui lapides dum ...
luminaetherii's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
160 views

What is the difference between me and mihi?

I'm studying Latin on Duolingo and am trying to find out more about parts that I don't understand. One of those words is me and mihi because Duolingo and any other sites I check says they both mean &...
Sebastion Price's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
388 views

Why ablative "natu" is used in these expressions?

In the novella Filia regis et monstrum horribile, by Andrew Olimpi, I have read (emphasis mine): Fīlia prīma nātū est puella pulchra. Sed fīlia secunda nātū pulchrior est quam soror sua. [...] Fīlia ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
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Questions for Regulus

I am recently trying to read Regulus, the Latin version of the Little Prince translated by Augusto Haury, and I met some problems in Chapter 4. It may be somewhat troublesome to make several threads ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
212 views

Unusual grammar in Ars Amatoria 1.509 f: 'a nulla tempora comptus acu'

I'm reading the Ars Amatoria in Hans Ørberg's annotated edition, this is book 1.509 f: Forma viros neglecta decet. Minoida Theseus abstulit, a nulla tempora comptus acu; I get the sense: "It ...
consistebat's user avatar
5 votes
1 answer
340 views

Why would an accusative become the subject in Tacitus, Annales 1.28?

I am translating Tacitus's Annales 1.28 and the first line is "noctem minacem et in scelus erupturam fors leniuit: ..." When looking at other people's translation they have said "The ...
Pip's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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Usage of ablative in a sentence by Curtius

This text comes from Quintus Curtius Rufus Historiae Alexandri Magni, book 3, chapter 5 (emphasis mine): Mediam Cydnus amnis, de quo paulo ante dictum est, interfluit. Et tunc aestas erat, cuius ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
162 views

Why ablative "corporibus" and "funeribus" are used in this excerpt from Tacitus "Annals" XVI?

In Tacitus Annals XVI, 13, one can read (emphasis mine on the words that cause me difficulty): Vastata Campania turbine ventorum, qui villas arbusta fruges passim disiecit pertulitque violentiam ad ...
Charo's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
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On meaning and syntactic structure of "usque eo quoad his sex annis"

I am reading the Latin version of the Little Prince, namely Regulus, translated by Auguste Haury. In the beginning of Chap. 2, I saw this sentence a little hard for me: Sic aetatem solus egi nec ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
99 views

aestus immanes -- parsing a sentence from Augustine's Confessions

Please consider this passage from Book III, chapter 2 of Augustine's Confessions: Ut quid decurrit in torrentem picis bullientis, aestus immanes taetrarum libidinum, in quos ipsa mutatur et vertitur ...
Chris's user avatar
  • 111
5 votes
2 answers
219 views

Grammar of rogatum auxilium, askee modified instead of asker

In the following passage from De Bello Gallico 11, I do not understand why rogatum apparently agrees with Caesar (or maybe modifies auxilium?) instead of legatos: Aedui, cum se suaque ab eis defendere ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
865 views

Why "quod" and not "quo" is used here?

In chapter XXII of Lingua latina per se illustrata: Colloquia Personarum, I have read the following sentence (emphasis mine in the word I find difficult to understand): Hic anulus ex auro puro factus ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,092
3 votes
1 answer
190 views

Use of the passive in Caesar "agros populabantur" to indicate state of action

At first there seemed to me to be a grammar error in De Bello Gallico I.11: Helvetii iam per angustias et fines Sequanorum suas copias traduxerant et in Aeduorum fines pervenerant eorumque agros ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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6 votes
1 answer
501 views

Should these "vellus" be "vellerum"?

I read the following text in the book Método de Latín I by Santiago Segura Munguía, published by the University of Deusto (emphasis mine on the words that cause me difficulty): Multas fabulas a ...
Charo's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
120 views

Is "impossibile" an adjective in "ad impossibile nemo tenetur"?

In "ad impossibile nemo tenetur", is "impossibile" a noun derived from the adjective impossibilis, or just an adjective with the word rem implied?
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
263 views

What's the role of "atque" in this sentence?

This sentence comes from chapter XXII of Lingua latina per se illustrata: Colloquia Personarum (emphasis mine in the word I find difficult to understand): Putāsne mē tantum atque tam pulchrum ānulum ...
Charo's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
118 views

Interpretation of a causal clause in the subjunctive, A&G 5.40

How should the following sentence from Allen and Greenough 5.40 be parsed? Rediit quodsē oblītum nesciō quid dīceret. ("He returned because he said that he forgot something.") --Cicero, De ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
334 views

Why is "cum" used in this sentence from "De Bello Gallico"?

This sentence comes from Caesar's De Bello Gallico (emphasis mine in the part I'm trying to understand): Dum haec a Caesare geruntur, Treveri magnis coactis peditatus equitatusque copiis Labienum cum ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,092
3 votes
1 answer
146 views

Haec verba tandem mercātōrem perturbātum aliquid cōnsōlāri videntur

In page 236 line 12–126 of lingua latina per se illustrata there is the following sentence Haec verba tandem mercātōrem perturbātum aliquid cōnsōlāri videntur. I gets to me that it is trying to say ...
Dolphínus's user avatar
5 votes
2 answers
612 views

Why feminine is used in "haec locuta"?

The following sentence comes from lines 74–75 of chapter XXV of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana, after Ariadna has said some words to Theseus: Haec locūta, Ariadna Thēseō fīlum longum ...
Charo's user avatar
  • 2,092
4 votes
1 answer
180 views

Why "ipse hic" is used here and not "ipse tu"?

Lines 105–107 of chapter XXIV of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana reads (emphasis mine): Cēterum facile tibi est frātrem tuum reprehendere, dum ipse hīc in mollī lectulō cubās. Tūne ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
2 answers
348 views

Why is "promissum" (singular) used here and not "promissa" (plural)?

Lines 166–173 of chapter XXIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana reads (emphasis mine in the word I find difficult to understand):       Mārcus: "Posthāc bonus discipulus ...
Charo's user avatar
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9 votes
1 answer
381 views

Syntax of sentences with the verb "pudet"

In Lewis and Short, I have seen that the verb pudeo is chiefly used as an impersonal verb. In fact, I have found some examples of such usage in chapter XXIII of Lingua latina per se illustrata. ...
Charo's user avatar
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5 votes
2 answers
154 views

Imperfect subjunctive in exclamation

I'm reading Phaedrus's version of Aesop Fables via Ørberg's Lingua Latina per se Illustrata. In Phaedrus, III. 7 (The Dog & the Wolf) : [Wolf:] "Quanto est facilius mihi sub tecto vivere, et ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
661 views

Use of the personal pronoun demonstratively

I notice in the following sentence from Cicero, he seems to be using the personal pronoun demonstratively: De meis scriptis misi ad te Graece perfectum consulatum meum. eum librum L. Cossinio dedi. (&...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
347 views

Is this construction "accusativus cum infinitivo"?

In chapter XXI, lines 115-116, of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana (page 167) there is this sentence: Nōn difficile est mātrem Mārcī fallere! Its meaning is clear to me, but I'm not ...
Charo's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
63 views

Quam as a temporal conjunction vs adverb of extent

In the following sentence from Historia Augusta: si quidem tantae luxuriae fuisse dicitur ut etiam, quam de Syria rediit, popinam domi instituerit,... Should I interpret quam as a temporal conjunction ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
496 views

"Vilicae quae sunt officia"

Vilicae quae sunt officia, curato faciat. It is taken from De Agri Cultura, 143.1, and I found an English translation: See that the housekeeper performs all her duties. Faciat is singular, ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
198 views

Fleo is a transitive verb?

Normally, in English we treat the verb to cry as intransitive, however in Latin it seems to be used transitively. For example: Amissum non flet cum sola est Gellia patrem She cries "at" her ...
Tyler Durden's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
132 views

Why is dative used in this sentence?

The following sentence appears in lines 12-14 of chapter XX of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana: Sī māter īnfantem suum ipsa alere nōn potest sīve non vult, īnfāns ab aliā muliere ...
Charo's user avatar
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6 votes
2 answers
1k views

What's the role of the pronoun "iis" in this context?

In lines 48-52 of chapter XVI of Lingua latina per se illustrata. Familia Romana one can read: Merīdīes dīcitur ea caelī pars ubi sōl merīdīe vidētur; pars contrāria septenriōnes appellātur ā septem ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
493 views

Conjunctive "cum" + indicative in Menaechmi

In the last scene of Menaechmi, Plautus wrote Pol profecto haud est dissimilis, meam cum formam noscito. (Line 1065) Henry T. Riley's translation gives: Troth, it really is not unlike, so far as I ...
Kotoba Trily Ngian's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
286 views

What's the grammatical role of "mille passus" in this sentence?

In chapter XII of the 2003 edition of Lingua latina per se illustrata, one can read the following sentence (lines 93-94): Aemilius in castrīs habitat mīlle passūs ā fīne imperīi. I understand its ...
Charo's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
848 views

What is this word and what is it doing?

I'm reading Ανάβασις by Xenophon. Here Klearchos has basically said: "someone else might want to command at this point". ὡς δὲ τῷ ἀνδρὶ ὃν ἂν ἕλησθε πείσομαι ᾗ δυνατὸν μάλιστα, ἵνα εἰδῆτε ...
mike rodent's user avatar
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3 votes
2 answers
893 views

What's the meaning of "soli" in this sentence?

I found the following sentence in https://www.cpdl.org/wiki/index.php/Victimae_paschali_laudes: Credendum est magis soli Mariae veraci quam ... This appears to be literally translated into More ...
H Koba's user avatar
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5 votes
1 answer
400 views

What's the role of the word "scribam" in this Cicero's sentence?

This sentence comes from a letter by Cicero to Atticus written when the former is in exile. It can be found in Epistulae ad Atticum 3, 5: Ad te quid scribam nescio. I understand that "nescio&...
Charo's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
210 views

What does "pares" mean in this sentence from the "Living Latin" reader?

I am having trouble understanding this sentence from Living Latin: A Graded Reader: Pro isto vestro in me officio pares agere gratias vix possum, referre nequaquam! I guess it means something like ...
user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
197 views

On the mechanics of reality

How would you say "on the mechanics of reality" I'm not happy with my own translation but I can't quite put the finger of what im doing wrong Help!
Emanuel Valdez's user avatar
6 votes
1 answer
184 views

"Sibi quisque nunc nominet eos quibus scit et vinum male credi et sermonem bene"

In Seneca's Moral Letters (letter 83): Sibi quisque nunc nominet eos quibus scit et vinum male credi et sermonem bene. How to parse the bold part grammatically? why are vinum and sermo in the ...
d_e's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
199 views

Why is "se" used with "secum" in this quote from Livy?

In this quote from Livy (6.8.6): "ita quocumque se intulisset victoriam secum haud dubiam trahebat." "thus, in whatever direction he went, he carried certain victory with him." ...
tony's user avatar
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