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Questions tagged [grammar-identification]

Use this tag when asking about a grammatical structure you cannot name and want explained.

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4
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2answers
83 views

Is “ante a priori” correct?

As I understand it, "a posteriori" means "from the latter," and "a priori" means "from the former." Suppose there was something predating the former in the context above. How would that be expressed ...
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0answers
51 views

“Renegatus”: an active perfect participle from a non-deponent verb?

Several dictionaries' etymologies of English "renegade" trace it to Medieval Latin renegatus, an apostate, one who has denied his religion and gone back to another. Renegatus in turn is the perfect ...
5
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1answer
69 views

How do I name the individual parts of the lumbricals muscle of the foot in latin?

As we can see, Wikipedia lists the lumbricals muscle and tells us that the muscle contains four parts. I need to name all four individual parts of the muscle and their respective side in the body. I ...
8
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2answers
507 views

Where is the correct position to set right or left of muscle names for anatomical names?

Muscles and bones have Latin names as can be found on wikipedia. I need to name muscles and bones with their Latin name and I also need to specify if it's the left or the right muscle in the human ...
4
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0answers
50 views

Any material on so-called “inverse analysis” and “minimal pairs” to practice Latin grammar?

I was wondering if anyone could provide me with references on any online material (pdf, links, etc.) of Latin Grammar which can contain exercises based on so-called "inverse analysis" and "minimal ...
3
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1answer
128 views

The grammar of the expression “mihi cordi est”

Recently I encountered the phrase "mihi cordi est", after googling it I saw it is quite common phrase that seem to mean "it pleases me". For example: "vita horrida, arida, atque dura, mihi cordi est". ...
4
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2answers
230 views

Occasus nescius

In the first line of this 12th-century conductus: Sol oritur occasus nescius what does nescius refer to? Maybe diagramming the sentence is all I need, because I don't follow the grammar. If the ...
5
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2answers
612 views

The Purpose of “Natu”

Following on from the question "Using Genitive & Infinitive To Describe Characteristics"; Joonas (26/6/19): "adulescentis est maiores natu revereri." = "It is of a young person to respect his/ her ...
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2answers
67 views

Using genitive and infinitive to describe characteristics

Answering this question, I recalled a somewhat rare construction used to express that an action is characteristic of someone. Pekkanen's Ars Grammatica (§77.1) gives two examples: Cuiusvis hominis ...
4
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1answer
38 views

Grammatical analysis of comparative parts (i.e. “tam … quam”, etc.)

I have the following sentence from Seneca, epistula 1, §2: "Cum placuerit fieri, toto illum pectore admitte; tam audaciter cum illo loquere quam tecum." However, I'm not sure what the "tam audaciter ...
4
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1answer
58 views

μετὰ τοῦτο ἄκουε (Symposion.215)

I have a question about the following extract (Platon's Symposion, 215) [Alcibiades describes Socrates as a Silenus's statue and as Marsyas, a satyr.] ὅτι μὲν οὖν τό γε εἶδος ὅμοιος εἶ τούτοις, ὦ ...
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2k views

What does “enim et” mean?

A couple days ago, a friend sent me an excerpt from a new game, asking about a Latin phrase in it: Contra Diabolus enim et alii Daemones (In the game, this is the motto of a group of Catholic ...
3
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1answer
62 views

Syntax of Ille: “numquam est ille miser cui facile est mori”

What is the syntax of ille in the sentence: "numquam est ille miser cui facile est mori"? I get that cui is indirect object, but what is the function of the demonstrative pronoun ille in the sentence?
8
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438 views

What sort of grammatical construct is ‘Quod per sortem sternit fortem’?

In the poem ‘O Fortuna’ (anon., 13th c., but made famous by Carl Orff’s setting), there is this verse: Quod per sortem sternit fortem mecum omnes plangite! This is typically translated as ‘...
2
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2answers
53 views

On the use (or not) of genitive in some verses of the Vulgata

I'm a bit puzzled with some verses of the Vulgata, regarding the use or not of genitive. Consider 3 Regnum (1 Kings in non LXX-based bibles). Verses 13-15 in Chapter 10 go as follows: [13] Rex ...
5
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2answers
2k views

What does “Dominus providebit” mean?

Does "Dominus providebit" mean "The Lord will provide" or "The Lord provides"? I once had a bit of an argument with a guy who studied Latin over that. It's an inscription that appears on the rim of ...
4
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2answers
193 views

On the (typical?) ambiguity of “Porta clausa est”

It is often said that Porta clausa est can have two readings depending on the categorial nature of the participle: verbal (cf. clauditur/clausa est) or adjectival (cf. clausa est/clausa fuit), which ...
7
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2answers
515 views

How was the “elliptical dual” used?

In a comment on this answer, TKR brought up an interesting point of grammar I'd never heard of. Αἴαντε [Ajax-DUAL] is an interesting case. Though readers of Homer since antiquity have interpreted ...
6
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1answer
94 views

Parsing Priapea 31

Intermediate here. I am having a hard time parsing this poem (Carmina Priapea 31). Apologies for the tawdry material, by the way :) Donec proterva nil mei manu carpes, licebit ipsa sis pudicior ...
3
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1answer
263 views

«θύων τε γὰρ φανερὸς ἦν πολλάκις μὲν οἴκοι» (Xenophon, Memorabilia, 1.1.2)

Xenophon, Memorabilia, 1.1.2: πρῶτον μὲν οὖν, ὡς οὐκ ἐνόμιζεν οὓς ἡ πόλις νομίζει θεούς, ποίῳ ποτ᾽ ἐχρήσαντο τεκμηρίῳ; θύων τε γὰρ φανερὸς ἦν πολλάκις μὲν οἴκοι, πολλάκις δὲ ἐπὶ τῶν κοινῶν τῆς ...
5
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2answers
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How often is “et” used as an adverb, and what might distinguish that usage?

The conjunction et, in addition to its common use as a coordinating conjunction meaning and, can also be used adverbially, encompassing similar meanings as those found in words like etiam, item, etc. ...
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2answers
415 views

Agreement in “medio tutissimus ibis”

Ovid's Metamorphoses, Book II, line 137 gives us the aphorism (in) medio tutissimus ibis The English translation for this is typically given as "In the middle, you will go most safe." How does "...
6
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1answer
71 views

On Declensions and Gender

after advancing on German gramatically as my second foreign language, I wanted to pursue my interest in Latin. Grammar seemed to me pretty straightforward, yet so many to memorize. I'm self-teaching ...
5
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1answer
117 views

Three (very similar) mottoes and a general grammar question

Hope you guys don't mind helping me. I'm looking to translate three mottoes into Latin, and I think these are beyond my capability to naturally translate: Do not be too kind; do not be too angry; ...
4
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1answer
99 views

What do the future active participle “editurus” and the gerundive or gerund “scribendum” mean in this sentence?

When I was trying to find information to answer ktm5124's question about “anticipātiō, anticipātiōnis”, I came across a passage that I am not advanced enough to understand fully. I'd like to ask for ...
5
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1answer
100 views

Parsing a subphrase of an ablative absolute

I can't figure out how the phrase "et audito eo multa faciebat" in the following sentence should be parsed: Herodes enim metuebat Ioannem, sciens eum virum iustum et sanctum, et custodiebat eum: ...
7
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1answer
66 views

Use of subjunctinve in a North & Hillard translation exercise

North & Hillard Ex. 228 includes: Next day Caesar had again an army which, though diminished, was prepared to face all dangers manfully. A footnote states: "Of the concessive conjunctions ...
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2answers
268 views

Why is there “is” in “… dīcitur is locus…”?

Why is there is (it) in the following phrase from Ørberg's Lingua Latina per se Illustrata, page 118? Ōstium sīve ōs flūminis dīcitur is locus quō flumen in mare īnfluit. Literally: By Ostium or ...
5
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1answer
81 views

What is the meaning of the phrase “solitō māiōre”?

A fellow member of a Latin Discord server I participate in posted this link to an article with a question regarding how one would interpret the phrase "solitō māiōre". Despite our efforts to interpret ...
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2answers
508 views

“Veni, O Sapientia…”

I could use a little help with parsing the second verse of this famous Advent hymn: Veni, O Sapientia, Quae hic disponis omnia, Veni, viam prudentiae, Ut doceas et gloriae. I ...
4
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1answer
164 views

Relative Clause of Purpose with Quo

Moreland has this sentence in Relative Clause of Purpose (Unit 14): Properatis quo celerius adveniatis. which it translates as: You hasten by which you may arrive more quickly. The adjective '...
5
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1answer
75 views

Future-Perfect?

In North & Hillard, Ex 215, the following sentence: There can be little doubt that the guides, whether through treachery or ignorance, were mainly responsible for the disaster. is translated ...
2
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1answer
110 views

Did I translate and understand this optative correctly? (Greek)

In book X of his Republic, Plato is talking about the prizes and rewards made out to good men. Once again, I have the gist of the sentence, but I'm a little unsure of a minor detail. καὶ ἀνθρώπων ...
2
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1answer
83 views

What construction is used with φάθι εἶναι? (Plat. Rep. 6.508e)

I think I have the gist of this short sentence, but I would like a little more clarity on one detail. What construction is governing the phrase φάθι εἶναι? I have parsed φάθι as the 2nd singular ...
2
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2answers
195 views

Origin and explanation of memoriae

For an assignment, I have been translating several Latin inscription (on tombstones) from 400–600 AD and one phrase that occurs quite often is memoriae (sometimes with an adjective such as ...
3
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1answer
76 views

The (implied) meaning of “Et” in “Et in medio…” of Ubi Caritas

Here is a passage in Ubi Caritas: Simul ergo cum in unum congregamur: Ne nos mente dividamur, caveamus. Cessent iurgia maligna, cessent lites. Et in medio nostri sit Christus Deus. The English ...
4
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1answer
44 views

grammar perplexity in Ficīnus

I'm reading Ficīnus's Latin translation of Plato's Apology and came across the following passage, two things in which baffle me. (They're unrelated, so I'm making them two separate questions.) ...
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4answers
5k views

“Et in terra pax hominibus bona voluntas” [sic!]

I have a German Christmas song of the 16th century, which is bilingual, German–Latin. The lyrics go as follows (I translated the German parts into English): O how beautiful the group of ...
2
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2answers
807 views

Is the sentence “omnis res est” (“every thing is”) grammatical?

Is the sentence omnis res est ("every thing is") grammatical? Likewise, are sentences like aliqua res est and nulla res est grammatical?
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2answers
264 views

Understanding the stem(s) of 'struere'

The present, perfect, and participle stems1 of the verb struere are stru-, strux-, and struct-. The -s- in the perfect stem and the -t- in the participle stem are nothing unusual, but they seem to ...
3
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2answers
128 views

“Stantes erant” vs. “stabant”

Triggered by this question. What's the difference in meaning between: Stantes erant pedes nostri, in atriis tuis, Jerusalem. and Stabant pedes nostri, in atriis tuis, Jerusalem. and does this ...
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2answers
228 views

Can the supine ablative be used for motion?

I came across an Asterix translated into Latin. In the first story page the village chief notices that Asterix and Obelix return from a hunt and says: Asterix atque Obelix venatu redeunt! My question ...
10
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1answer
502 views

Translation of “…quae parvas aves capit et est.”

I was reading Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata to practice my fluency of understanding simple sentences. In the tenth chapter, Bestiae et Homines (page 69), I came across a description of eagles. ...
11
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1answer
413 views

What's the difference between mutantur and mutamur?

A quote by John Owen: Tempora mutantur, nos et mutamur in illis. I was wondering if you could tell me the difference between mutantur and mutamur?
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2answers
389 views

A list of the categories and subcategories of the Latin conjunctions

I am learning Latin. I have bought a grammar book, which is not that great. My professor is using words like adversative conjunction, comparative, conditional, and so on. I can't find any long list ...
6
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2answers
2k views

The three maxims at the Temple of Apollo (Greek)

There were three maxims carved into the Temple of Apollo at Delphi: γνῶθι σεαυτόν (know thyself) μηδὲν ἄγαν (nothing in excess) Ἐγγύα πάρα δ'ἄτη (a pledge comes from folly) The first two maxims make ...
4
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1answer
105 views

Why is the relative pronoun put in the dative case? why feminine? (Greek)

I was a little stumped, here, when I came across the feminine relative pronoun ᾗ. ἴσως δή, εἶπον, παρὰ τὸ ἔθος γελοῖα ἂν φαίνοιτο πολλὰ περὶ τὰ νῦν λεγόμενα, εἰ πράξεται ᾗ λέγεται. καὶ μάλα, ...
11
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2answers
706 views

What is the significance of the different declensions and conjugations?

I've been slowly trying to teach myself Latin with the help of this site. I've gone past the parts where it talks about first, second, third etc declension nouns, and it all seems quite arbitrary as ...
7
votes
2answers
400 views

What's it called when a verb shares the same root as its object or modifier?

I have noticed in both Greek and Latin that sometimes a verb shares the same root as its object or modifier. This construction looks funny to me as an English speaker, as we don't often encounter this ...
7
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2answers
899 views

Proper parsing of “respondeo dicendum quod”

Anyone who has read the Scholastics, such as St. Thomas Aquinas, are familiar with the basic structure of an articulus: (Here's an example.) Objections ("videtur quod...") Quote from authority ("sed ...