Questions tagged [grammar-identification]

Use this tag when asking about a grammatical structure you cannot name and want explained.

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4
votes
1answer
93 views

What tense is the verb "data est" in?

What is the tense of data est? I feel like it is the perfect passive (he was given), but that would be datus est.
6
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2answers
339 views

What is the subject of "venit" in this sentence from Naufragium?

Reading Naufragium by Erasmus (1523), I came across this sentence. I include the whole sentence for context, but I'm only asking about the part in bold: Circumspicienti tandem venit in mentem de ima ...
2
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1answer
73 views

What are the verb conjugation names called in Latin?

What are the terms in Latin for the Latin verb conjugations? I would like to also know the Latin for the mixed conjugation (or if preferred that known as the io sub conjugation) and any term for verbs ...
5
votes
1answer
83 views

Translating Monica's Tomb

I am trying to translate this sarcophagus. The text is (excluding the Christogram at the top) Sepulchrum ubi B. Monicae corpus apud Ostia Tiberina annis MXL iacuit ob in eo edita in eius ...
5
votes
2answers
132 views

What is affecta modifying in this sentence from Fabulae Faciles?

In the following sentence from Fabulae Faciles, I cannot figure out what affecta is modifying: Vix vestem induerat Glauce, cum dolorem gravem per omnia membra sensit, et paulo post crudeli cruciatu ...
3
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3answers
282 views

Why or when do we use Genitive to say you're in a place

I was under the impression that you would use mostly Ablative to say something like in the hall and Accusative to say into the hall IN ATRIO vs IN ATRIUM But now I've read that you could use ...
3
votes
1answer
72 views

AB + ablative, AD + accusative. Does it apply to other similar verbs?

Stumble upon these 2 sentences: UNDE VENIT MEDUS? TUSCULO VENIT. QUO IT MEDUS? ROMAM IT. Both are telling me from where Medus came from a to where he is going. I notice that the name of the towns ...
6
votes
1answer
81 views

What is the grammar of ‘quid illud quod’ in Ambrose De. ob. Val. 35?

Introduction and question Ambrose is generally not too hard to read; his structure is pretty straight forward, his word-choice is not too weird, and he seems to have favoured a style which would be ...
5
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1answer
335 views

Why Does Cicero use the Third-Person Singular Instead of the Plural Form?

Cicero, de Oratore (2.25.108): "...in quibus hoc praecipit ratio et doctrina ut vis eius rei, quam definias sic exprimatur ut neque absit quicquam neque supersit," "...on which ...
5
votes
2answers
274 views

When using the verb *to be* do you always use nominative for subject and object?

When using the verb to be do you always use nominative for subject and object? For example: FEMINAE DOMINAE VIRORUM SUNT. Or FEMINA EST PULCHRA
4
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1answer
105 views

If a demonstrative is not modifying a noun, is it called a demonstrative pronoun?

I was confused on this since aren't demonstrative adjectives phrases like , "this fast" or "this large". If they are, then demonstrative adjectives not necessarily modifying nouns ...
13
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1answer
2k views

Why is it "nomen mihi est" for "my name is", but it's "tibi nomen est" for "your name is"?

I understand that there is no strict order, but why is it that this specific order is preferable over something like "mihi nomen est" or "nomen tibi est". The image below is from ...
5
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4answers
567 views

"gerund + genitive" vs "gerund+accusative" ("scribendo epistulas" vs "scribendo epistularum")

So far I was thinking the way of saying "He spends time in writing letters" (example from A&G) might be terit tempus scribendo epistulas or terit tempus scribendis epistulis. But can ...
3
votes
3answers
411 views

Is "dentibus" ablative in "Lupus collum ovis petit dentibus..."

In Cap. IX of LLPSI Pars I, Ørberg tells the story of a black sheep wandering into the forest where it's confronted by a wolf. The wolf finds the sheep alone in the darkness of the forest, and the ...
6
votes
1answer
96 views

What role does "municipatum" play in this sentence?

The abbot Berno of Reichenau, in the opening sentence of his Prologus in Tonarium, some time between 1021 and 1036, called himself the following: licet parvus meritis, servus tamen Dei Genitricis ...
28
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4answers
6k views

ATM in Vatican City: "Inserito scidulam quaeso ut faciundam cognoscas rationem"

The automated teller machines in Vatican City show this screen when awaiting a card: Could someone, quaeso, break this down word by word? There are a number of things here that I find puzzling or ...
4
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1answer
159 views

Plural for Succubus and Incubus

Succubus & incubus don't show up in the Latin dictionaries I've searched. I'm wondering what the plurals would be. I did find succuba, 1st decl fem. Could it be that it didn't morph into a 2nd ...
8
votes
1answer
311 views

How to say indirect speech + "there is/are" in latin?

I only know to say the "there is/are" in latin we use "est/sunt" , but how about when it is part of indirect speech? E.g " He/she said that there is (something) " I'm ...
4
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2answers
525 views

Quem quaeritis?

Different versions of the Visitatio sepulchri, have different line endings. Some use Christicole whereas elsewhere I have seen Christicolae. What is the difference between Christicole/Christicoles/...
6
votes
1answer
118 views

Can valeo be used transitively?

Looking through the entry in Lewis & Strong, I couldn't find any mention of the accusative being used with valeo, except as the object of certain prepositions. However, the following use of magna ...
3
votes
1answer
64 views

What are the Roles of "Quin" and "Sit" in "fieri non potest quin sit"?

In the question on Sherlockian logic, Batavulus, in his answer gave an alternative translation of the clause "it must be believed"/ "one must believe it", which is: "fieri ...
4
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1answer
111 views

Is this Gerundive-Based Quote from Seneca A Direct or Indirect Question?

Introduction In his answer to Q: What is the difference in meaning/usage between "nasciturus" and "nascendus"?, Mitomino provided some interesting examples of the use of the ...
5
votes
1answer
119 views

"nec sit terris ultima Thule" - how should terris be interpreted?

Seneca's Medea: Venient annis saecula seris, quibus Oceanus vincula rerum laxet, et ingens pateat tellus, Tethysque novos detegat orbes nec sit terris ultima Thule. I have my doubts with respect to ...
3
votes
1answer
93 views

"Multi quidem facilius se abstinent ut non utantur, quam temperent ut bene utantur" (the usage of comparatives)

From Augustine De Bono Coniugali: Multi quidem facilius se abstinent ut non utantur, quam temperent ut bene utantur. While the meaning of the sentence is clear, I'm not sure about the grammatical ...
4
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0answers
110 views

Can a finite verb modify another verb as if it were a gerund? (De manibus delapsa arma ceciderunt)

How should we interpret the connection between delapsa and ceciderunt in the following: de manibus audacissimorum civium delapsa arma ipsa ceciderunt (Cic. De Officiis) Naturally I could not see ...
6
votes
1answer
421 views

How does "quid causae" work grammatically?

I do not understand the grammar of quid causae = "[for] what cause", as in Nescio quid causae fuerit, cur nullas ad me litteras dares I do not know what the reason was why you sent me no ...
5
votes
1answer
180 views

Is this double accusative or hyperbaton or something else?

I've only been learning Latin for a month or so, but I'm specifically learning so that I can read scientific and mathematical texts from the 17th-19th centuries. It's slow going, of course- I'm only ...
6
votes
3answers
361 views

Grammatical structure of "Obsidibus imperatis centum hos Haeduis custodiendos tradit"

@Mitomino points out in this comment that my understanding of what modifies what in the sentence shown below from De Bello Gallico (VI.4.3) is mistaken. I'll diagram my understanding below. Can you ...
2
votes
1answer
129 views

Translating a sentence with "virisque"

'Res Romana stat moribus antiquis virisque' Please, help me to translate it, especially I have trouble understanding the grammar in the second part, virisque is from vir – 'man', so why here is ...
7
votes
1answer
156 views

Is "rogamur ab eo ut veniamus" grammatically correct?

It is grammatically correct if I turn any Main active verb in the Indirect commands into passive ones? Active - rogat nos ut veniamus - He asks us to come. Passive - " rogamur ab eo ut veniamus &...
3
votes
1answer
125 views

What is the term for this particular use of the ablative?

I am currently doing a comprehension on the destruction of Numantia (Florus I.34). The comprehension question I am stuck on is as follows: 'State and explain the case of the word fossa'. The sentence ...
4
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0answers
75 views

Determining the difference between ambiguous nouns and verb forms without macrons

Salvete omnes, As I've mentioned a couple times on here, I am working on adding macrons to a specific text, I can't really use an auto-macronizer (nor will I, or do I want to). But there is a bit of a ...
5
votes
1answer
112 views

Genitive case: why "litterarum vetustatem" and not "litteras vetustatis"

From time time I encounter a pair of nouns; one noun is in a genitive case, apparently modifies the other, but where I expect them to behave differently. examples: memoriae tradere litterarum ...
7
votes
1answer
297 views

The function of "quo" in "Quō quisque est sollertior, hōc docet īrācundius"

In A&G on indefinite pronouns there are two sentences of a similar structure: Bonus liber melior est quisque quō mâior. (The larger a good book is, the better.) Quō quisque est sollertior, hōc ...
1
vote
1answer
53 views

Carpe sciurum (sieze/harvest the squirrel?)

Would 'carpe sciurum' be a functional translation of 'seize the squirrel'? (As in to 'harvest' or 'pluck' the squirrel?)
6
votes
1answer
114 views

Nepos' Themistocles: ut ingratis omnes ad depugnandum cogerentur?

I am reading the biography of Themistocles by Cornelius Nepos. He recounts the story of how Themistocles used a deceit to bring about the naval engagement that went down in history as the famous ...
11
votes
2answers
4k views

"Tu quoque, Brutus, mi fili?" Grammar question

Someone told me these were Caesar's actual last words. Google confirms this. But I can't find an explanation for what looks to me like weird grammar. First of all, shouldn't "Brutus" be &...
6
votes
2answers
148 views

Confusing syntax in two sentences

I seem to be confused by the constructions of these two sentences from a Medieval Latin text: Unde vocum alia suavis est illa, scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. and Multiplicem ...
8
votes
1answer
85 views

Why "decorem indutus est" instead of "decore indutus est"?

Psalm 92 v. 1 Dóminus regnávit, decórem indútus est: * indútus est Dóminus fortitúdinem, et præcínxit se. The Lord hath reigned, he is clothed with beauty: * the Lord is clothed with strength, and ...
5
votes
1answer
201 views

How to say: "X differs from Y by(in) Z"

I want to say something of this sort: The word "res" differs from the word "rex" by one letter. In "Lexicon totius Latinitatis" I saw under the term "dama": "[Dama] differt a capreis solis ...
3
votes
1answer
114 views

Partitive genitive in Spinoza

Spinoza, Ethics, De Deo, Propositio 15, Scholium: Sane rerum quae realiter ab invicem distinctae sunt, una sine alia esse et in suo statu manere potest Is rerum partitive genitive and is it ...
3
votes
1answer
259 views

The usage of present passive infinitive

In Augustine confessions we read: "quid tibi sum ipse, ut amari te iubeas a me et, nisi faciam, irascaris mihi et mineris ingentes miserias?" (book I, cap. V) I can't understand the usage of the ...
4
votes
1answer
134 views

How does one express adjectives in the present tense in Latin which aren't everlasting?

Exempli gratia, how would one say 'I am perturbed' in Latin opposed to 'I am human'? The state of being perturbed can change, but the state of being a human being cannot change, so how does one write ...
4
votes
1answer
96 views

Should one use the singular or plural when the number is unknown?

It just occurred to me (I'm that guy maybe starting the YouTube channel) that I don't know whether to use the singular or plural to address my audience in Latin. My thinking goes like this: plural ...
6
votes
3answers
400 views

grammar of "sapientiae tuae non est numerus"

in Confessions we read: magnus es, domine, et laudabilis valde. magna virtus tua et sapientiae tuae non est numerus. while the meaning is quite clear, I can't clearly resolve the literal ...
7
votes
1answer
266 views

What does "Filiane" mean?

I am learning Latin from Collar and Daniell's FIRST YEAR LATIN. In LESSON IV: THE GENITIVE CASE TO DENOTE POSSESSION, an exercise is given (sentence translation). Some examples: Līberatne? Līberō, ...
4
votes
2answers
100 views

Is "ante a priori" correct?

As I understand it, "a posteriori" means "from the latter," and "a priori" means "from the former." Suppose there was something predating the former in the context above. How would that be expressed ...
5
votes
0answers
91 views

"Renegatus": an active perfect participle from a non-deponent verb?

Several dictionaries' etymologies of English "renegade" trace it to Medieval Latin renegatus, an apostate, one who has denied his religion and gone back to another. Renegatus in turn is the ...
5
votes
1answer
83 views

How do I name the individual parts of the lumbricals muscle of the foot in latin?

As we can see, Wikipedia lists the lumbricals muscle and tells us that the muscle contains four parts. I need to name all four individual parts of the muscle and their respective side in the body. I ...
8
votes
2answers
685 views

Where is the correct position to set right or left of muscle names for anatomical names?

Muscles and bones have Latin names as can be found on wikipedia. I need to name muscles and bones with their Latin name and I also need to specify if it's the left or the right muscle in the human ...