10

I found an article that gives some excellent examples of this usage as well as practical tips for how to recognize it: Thomas Nelson, "The Third Qui, and Six Ways to Recognize It, or 'Who Happens, Maecenas?'" Nelson begins by noting that there are three kinds of qui. The first two are ubiquitous, and found in the L&S entry for the first meaning of qui: ...


8

Your analysis is correct: this is fīlia "daughter" + -ne "?". The trick is, -ne can attach to any word, not just verbs. In fact, it usually attaches to either the first word, or the most emphatic word, whatever that might be. Since nōn often comes at the beginning, nōn-ne became common enough that you'll often see it analyzed as a word of its own, rather ...


7

In Latin, it's fairly common to stick prepositions onto the fronts of verbs to create new shades of meaning. Sometimes the new meaning is the same as the verb plus the preposition (advenīre is basically the same as venīre ad), sometimes it's just plain intensive (dēplorāre is just plorāre but stronger), and sometimes it creates a new meaning different from ...


6

The best list to memorize before reading each chapter of LLPSI is this: Seriously, you heard wrong. The whole point of Lingua Latina Per Se Illustrata is to learn each word from context. It's called "the natural method" because it teaches Latin the way you learn your native language (just faster and more streamlined): from context, always from context, ...


6

The pelican as a symbol for Christ is extremely old, going back (at least) to the Physiologus, which is usually dated to the 2nd century AD (though some scholars have argued that it was composed in the 4th century). Here, the pelican is said to feed its young with its own blood: it's not hard to see why this was considered a fitting symbol of Christ's death ...


5

To answer your second question (since brianpck has already given an excellent answer to the first), quī is etymologically an ablative. The paradigm of the interrogatives quī, quis is a bit odd in that it combines third-declension forms (quis, quem) and first-/second-declension ones (quā, quō). This quī is originally a third-declension ablative form ("by ...


3

It is perhaps not easy to work out the relevant meaning differences if you only compare advenire and venire. In order to better understand the role of the prefix, it can be useful for you to consider the "full" picture/system, which involves comparing advenire with other prefixed verbs like pervenire, obvenire, evenire, etc. You'll then discover that each ...


3

The question has already been answered, but I cannot write this long stuff in a comment. In the book: "Grammaire latine complète, mise au nombre des livres classiques par le Conseil Royal de l'Instruction Publique" by Émile Lefranc. "In lieu of repeating the question, it's possible to: -to express "yes", using the affirmative adverbs: -sane -sane quidem -...


1

I've found that: Dans l'introduction, l'auteur insiste sur l'écart significatif qui existe entre les catégories chromatiques de la langue latine et celles des langues occidentales modernes. Il prend l'exemple de flauus, 'blond', viridis, 'verdoyant', et caerulus, '(bleu) profond', qui renvoient à des éléments précis dont la couleur n'est que l'une des ...


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