19

The source of this Latin ATM message, as confirmed is a few profiles (such as this one from the Catholic Herald and this one from The Telegraph) is the lately-deceased Reginald Foster, who was arguably one of the greatest Latin speakers of the past century. The Vatican Diaries, pg. 196 quotes Foster's own translation: The elevator whirred quietly to the top ...


12

Manuductio (verb: manuduco) is a late Latin word that literally means, "leading by the hand." See, for instance, "Mind Forming and Manuductio in Aquinas" (pay-wall protected), which discusses the word in the works of Thomas Aquinas. The Dictionnaire latin-français des auteurs du Moyen-Age gives as its earliest citation a work by Thomas ...


10

"Is this just a phonetic thing in this word, rather than a semantic one?" Yep. In fact, as Smyth says, αἰδώς is the only such "-οσ- stem" word in Attic. (In Homer you will also find ἠώς "dawn", which in Attic declines as an "Attic declension" noun, on which see below). So it might as well be considered irregular. The ...


9

@TKR is right about the specific case of αἰδώς and mentioned the Attic declension, but there's more to say: there is a good number of Greek nouns ending in -ως even outside the Attic declension, and the question of whether it's a meaningful suffix for forming words out of other words there is worth asking. Going through Wiktionary's list of Greek nouns and ...


7

The present tense includes both general action and progressive action. To say "I am becoming obscure," you would still use the present tense. Using the present participle plus esse is not a Classical equivalent to a present progressive in English. Also, fio doesn't have a present participle, since it is functionally the passive of facio. See you ...


6

Quibus latent deserta. Latēre = ‘to be hidden’; dēsertum = ‘desert’ (quite common in Vulgate, but also in Vergil, see L&S s.v. dēsero in fine).


5

Ricus and riccus show up in late Medieval and Humanist Latin, but they're certainly backports from French and Italian, not pre-Medieval loans. The various Romance cognates of rich are actually believed to represent three separate borrowings from three separate Germanic languages: Italian ricco is the most telling one, because it has a geminated consonant, ...


5

desolationes (in se) abscondentes — those that cover/hide deserts (within themselves)


5

The message is indeed hard to parse because of the broad meanings of ratio, facere, and cognoscere. I am not sure whether there can be a very solid and authoritative answer, so I will just share my view. I think the future imperative is simply used for sollemnity. I would not understand it referring to the future but just promoting the register of the text ...


5

Keeping to vocabulary selection the same (I assume the word is solitudo), I think a straight-forward translation is: Illi in quibus solitudines se occultant solitudines here is not the accusative case, but rather the nominative. Another options is to use the passive voice instead of active se occultare. I like this option the better, as desert is not the ...


4

With respect to (3) (4), I think it is very tempting to have congnosco to denote an active action that the user should do. So my guess it can be rendered identify or more freely on the context select. I read ratio faciunda as method of operation (method to be done). So the user is required to insert the card so that he can select a method from several ...


2

When I first saw this text it too struck me as unclear and unnatural. The first problem has since been resolved, the second however remains. Another reply mentions Foster himself translating it as 'Insert your card--scidulam--so you can access the operations allowed.' - that's certainly not an exact rendering of what the Latin says, which is instead: "...


2

Du Cange defines supportatio as "Defensio, tuitio, protectio". Justification would seem to work as a translation in this context.


2

A good place to start might be the famous hexameter verse: Tempora mutantur nos et mutamur in illis. Times are changing and we are changing with them. I am not sure about fluere, but at least mutari makes an idiomatic wording for "in a state of change". So, if something is in a state of change, I'd suggest saying simply (aliquid) mutatur. If you ...


2

How about κοπίβολος? But κοπίς is a curved knife, so possibly not very good for throwing. We might also construct ῥιψακινάκης by analogy with ῥίψασπις, one who throws away his shield in flight.


2

You know how in Greek there are three different words for love depending on what exactly you mean? The English 'sexy' is similar. However, the best I can think of is illecebrosus, -a, -um. From Lewis & Short: I.full of allurement, very enticing, attractive, seductive (ante- and post-class.): “istoc illecebrosius Fieri nihil potest,” Plaut. Bacch. 1, 1, ...


2

Universal human laziness would have favored dropping the voiceless velar before the voiced dental. Under rapid speech, I don't think the /k/ sound would survive long. You don't always need a universal sound change rule for every change in a language. Some changes are bound to be random or unique. That's the second law of thermodynamics (which takes ...


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