10

I would suggest simply: Ede, bibe, gaude! Or to several people: Edite, bibite, gaudete! I prefer to keep something like this simple and avoid prefixed verbs or other unnecessary detours. I like making a holiday greeting as accessible as possible to everyone with a limited knowledge of Latin. For eating and drinking the simplest verbs are edere and bibere. ...


9

Almost correct. The most common spelling of "never" in Latin is numquam. Fecit is the third-person, to get the first person just drop that t: feci Together you get: Numquam feci. Now, this corresponds to the act of making something. If you had a fuller sentence, we would be able to tell you if this is the correct idiom to use. Remember that ...


5

This is from the Bible, Ecclesistes 8:15. Therefore I commended mirth, because there was no good for a man under the sun, but to eat, and drink, and be merry, and that he should take nothing else with him of his labour in the days of his life, which God hath given him under the sun. The Vulgate renders this thus: laudavi igitur laetitiam quod non esset ...


4

As James K said, this is already in Latin. I would offer one thing, though: avoid the imperative. Whom are you ordering with the imperative? For these sorts of things, Latin prefers the jussive subjunctive: Comedamus et bibamus atque gaudeamus. Let us eat, drink, and be merry.


3

Adapting Horace's "nunc est bibendum" = "now one must drink", which was his exhortation to celebrate the fall of Antony & Cleopatra, in 30BC: "nunc est edendum, bibendum et gaudendum." = "now one must eat, drink & rejoice". For a full grammatical analysis of this use of the impersonal, neuter gerundive see Q: ...


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