12

Picea is the modern scientific name for the spruce genus, but its application to just spruces, like the application of Pinus to just pines and Abies to just firs (and indeed the narrowing of those categories in English), is a modern convention that basically became a thing faute de mieux. The Latin word picea is derived from pix 'pitch', and in principle ...


11

The verb that is intended here is almost certainly tollo, tollere, which shares third and fourth principal parts with sufferre*. Although sufferre can, according to Lewis & Short, mean 'hold up,' the entry also notes that this sense of the verb is 'very rare.' On the other hand, meanings such as 'pick up,' 'raise,' and 'lift' are primary for tollere. ...


8

They are related, but they are not equivalent. Vitare means 'to shun/to avoid' and has a sense of moving or staying away from something. A better synonym for it would actually be fugere 'to flee.' Cavere can be used in that way, but that's a more developed metaphor. Instead, it more means 'to beware of' in the sense of 'to be on your guard against.' If you ...


7

In Latin, sex is the numeral 6, and doesn't appear to have any other meanings other than as a numeral. Sexus does mean gender, but does not mean 6.


7

"…with his right hand he held up the sword…" See sense II.B in Lewis & Short, "To hold up, bear, support, sustain." The sub- prefix here means "up". Amazingly, sub is cognate with English "up". Here's an explanation of the connection, with more examples.


7

You highlighted your answer already: nota would indicate the physical tattoo in that sentence of Cicero's. We see it used in Pomponius Mela, too: Mossyni...notis corpus omne persignant The Mossyni "sign" their whole body with notes (words?). You'll should keep the perfect passive participles with it, though, if you plan on using it to describe ...


7

Both forms were used during the classical age, and both were common enough and correct. This applies to all(?) words with -np-, in which the n could be assimilated to the p, to form -mp-, but it was by no means always assimilated. Perhaps it depended on the author and the period?


6

I would like to add that even the modern nomeclature and the genus boundaries are far from granted. There is a consensus now, but it was not clear when the modern Linnean names were creted as many synonyms document. The common European spruce Picea abies was named Pinus abies by Linneus, but was later put to other genuses, namely as Abies abies and Picea ...


6

All three work. I would also recommend paene. Compare Cicero's "paene amicus" in one of his letters: eo die acerbum habuimus Curionem, Bibulum multo iustiorem, paene etiam amicum. On that day we thought that Curio was bitter, but Biblulus was more just by far, even almost friendly. Humanus fits best for "human", yielding the phrase: ...


5

Not every medical word will have a Latin or Greek root. Often times scientists coin nonsense or use non-Latin/Greek words or even personal names. For best practices without having to actually learn Latin and Greek, I'd suggest a course or textbook on Greek and Latin roots. Most universities teach a course on the subject, and textbooks abound. The textbooks ...


5

In the name homo sapiens, homo is the genus and sapiens the species. So using sapiens for a toy would imply that there are other species of toys that would not be intelligent, but would still have a binomial name. So the answer depends on the rest of the universe, if there are living toys that are not intelligent, using pupus sapiens is fine, or else, ...


5

crepundia refers to a child's rattle ludibrium means mockery or wantonness pupa can mean a little girl, but also a doll or a puppet - the male equivalent is pupus there are also the diminutive versions pupula and pupulus with similar meaning, except that pupula can also mean the pupil of an eye I think that 'doll' would be a good description of some of the ...


4

The meter is unfortunately not helpful here, as both with the i and without the i fit the anceps in that foot of the iambic senarius. But the manuscripts do weigh in. From Alex B.'s link: hepatiarius E3. G. Valla. he patiarius E. (u s. v.) J. epatiarius B. epatarius F Z. apatarius Guyetus ab ἀπατᾶν ducens. The manuscript tradition is therefore in favor of ...


4

(I'm going to answer this question primarily from the point of view of the wood, not the actual trees, as that's more interesting to me.) I'm not aware of any systematic study done to identify the specific species of maple found in archaeological finds, but the two species mentioned by Roger B. Ulrich in Roman Woodworking, which is a book well worth your ...


4

As a long-time Latinist and private Latin instructor for many years, When I saw «noe» first in Palestrina's Christus natus est hodie, I did not think of either Noah (though a nice potential callback to a great Biblical figure), nor «noël» (why in Italian?). I thought of these possible origins: It's some sort of obscure interjection, rarer than, say, Heus! ...


4

The simplest answer is to actually learn Ancient Greek and/or Latin to the extent that you'll start recognizing how words break down, and then get a good dictionary. (Some famous public-domain ones include Liddell-Scott-Jones and Lewis and Short.) For the most part, the "grammar" of these is standard Latin/Ancient Greek morphology, just a bit ...


2

As pointed out by cmw's answer, nota is a valid word for a tattoo but too general to use without context. If you are speaking of tattoos, nota will do just fine, but nobody will think of a tattoo first if you say that you saw a cool nota the other day. The goal of this answer is to give nouns that you could use that way. There will be no perfect choice as ...


1

An inanimate object that walks and talks like a human is the Graeco-Latin "automaton".


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