4

Regarding sentence (1), I believe to understand the function of alia, you have to look at the following sentences: Unde vocum alia suavis est illa, scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. Alia perspicuaque omnem implet continuum locum, sicut clangor tubarum. Alia subtilis, cui non est spiritus multus sicut infantium, mulierum, aegrotantium. Alia ...


4

The first sentence is I think simply a question of a misplaced comma. It makes good sense if read as follows: Unde vocum alia suavis est, illa scilicet quae subtilis, spissa, clara et acuta est. That is, "For that reason one voice is sweet, namely that one which..." The second seems more puzzling. Could sunt maybe stand for an implied sunt qui ...


4

μάχαιρα means "knife, dirk, dagger, short sword". It seems more suitable for your purpose than φάσγανον or ξίφος, both of which mean "sword" rather than "knife". (There is ξιφίδιον, a diminutive of the latter word, which does mean "small sword or knife", but using a diminutive in a compound is a bit unwieldy.) So ...


4

There are lots of options here, as is usually the case with this kind of question. As Sebastian's answer points out, a sequence of three datives (without et) is a good way to say "for X, Y, and Z", where "for" can have a broad range of meanings some of which are pretty close to "in pursuit of". Arguably more idiomatic than using ...


3

As Cerberus points out, plus is an adjective and has therefore the gender and number and case of the main word. There is also the corresponding adverb plus, which could be seen as the neuter accusative of the adjective. The word magis is also an adverb, but not synonymous with plus. I assume your question concerns the adverbial usage, but do bear in mind ...


3

This is the sort of question that dictionaries of synonyms were essentially created to answer. As this kind of dictionary seems to have thrived in the eighteenth and nineteenth century and somewhat withered since, they are all older texts. Let us see what we can find: Jean-Baptiste Gardin-Dumesnil published a dictionary of synonyms in the 18th century in ...


2

The usage of plus and other forms like plures, plura seems to be a little complicated and depend on the grammatical number. Plus can be used as a singular noun or an adverb The form plus looks like a singular neuter adjective in the nominative/accusative case. However, what I've read is that this word in the singular is only used as an adverb (the nominative/...


2

The adjective plus means "more". If you want to say more than, you can either use the (often elliptical) conjunction quam, or an ablative of comparison. [Ego] habeo plura capita quam homines [capita habent]. [Ego] habeo plura capita quam [ego habeo] caudas. After quam, you would use the same case as the first element of the comparison, so ego ...


2

The general rule for enumerations in Latin is that you have three options: either you put an et between every word: veritas et bonitas et pulchritudo – while this sounds repetitive in English, it is fine in Latin or you don't put an et anywhere: veritas, bonitas, pulchritudo (the Romans had no commas, so they just strung the words together, but we typically ...


2

I often found also the version πύξ λάξ δοντάξ, which seems a modernization. I also thought to have found the version πύξ λάξ ὀδὰξ, but later wasn't able to find anything else than entries regarding the common word formation of this terms, this could be a likely way the last term was introduced if it is spurious. πύξ λάξ seems to be a common frase in modern ...


1

Some common rules seem to emerge: avoid hybrid words, use connecting vowels in compounding, chose the specifically appropriate word(s) to adapt, there seems to be a preference for compounding (unsure about this), and the Vatican seems to prefer phrases to compounds as do others. It seems that hybrid words may not be preferable in Greek and Latin neologisms, ...


1

Yes! Nemo est qui... is a common enough formula in Latin, "there is no one who...". Since nemo can be used with est there is no reason it cannot be used with sum. Indeed the phrase nemo sum homo is attested. See here.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible