Skip to main content
14 votes
Accepted

Comparison of omnes, cuncti, and universi

Certainly there are differences between the three, which I hope the following will demonstrate with sufficient clarity. The roots of universus indicate 'turned into one', which describes a group ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.2k
12 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

Another partial answer. Tl;dr: kissing had a social role in Judaism that was inherited into Christianity (as osculum in the Vulgate), where it even had/acquired a ceremonial role (not sure if this ...
Rafael's user avatar
  • 11.6k
12 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

I cannot provide a complete answer either, but perhaps a few points one the subject of kissing, and the semantics of the words for it. I cannot, unfortunately, provide immediate literature references ...
kkm mistrusts SE's user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

Can infans refer to children who can speak?

In the Oxford Latin Dictionary (which only covers Classical Latin): An infant, little child (strictly, one not yet able to talk). The use of "strictly" in the parenthesis implies that even ...
rjpond's user avatar
  • 1,021
10 votes
Accepted

How to translate the Finnish "muka"?

Scilicet .2. ironically As much space in Smiths is given to the ironical use 'forsooth,' 'you may be sure,' as to the simple emphatic particle. When used in this sense Sc. is sometimes placed first ...
Hugh's user avatar
  • 8,693
10 votes

What does "quidem" REALLY mean?

A scholar named Joseph Solodow wrote an entire book called "The Latin Particle Quidem". To boil his work down as much as possible, the function of the word (because it's always safer to think of ...
Ellen Perry's user avatar
10 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

Here's counter-evidence for you, from Ovid Amores (2,5). inproba tum vero iungentes oscula vidi— illa mihi lingua nexa fuisse liquet— qualia non fratri tulerit germana severo, sed tulerit ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 11.7k
9 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

Smith's Copious & Critical English-Latin Dictionary (p. 430) in longish articles is good on this, giving suavium as the "most suitable word for ordinary use", osculor as "the term most suitable ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.2k
8 votes

How to use immo?

(will add examples later) Obviously, immo had several different uses in Classical Latin. Hannah Rosén (Rosén 2009) classifies it as a connective particle used for juncture and separation. She ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 11.7k
7 votes
Accepted

Using "sānē" v. "certē" v. "profectō"?

Ramshorn's Dictionary of Latin Synonyms, pg. 113, has a helpful entry on the four related terms certe, certo, profecto, and sane: Certe: certainly, of a thing; at least, if it applies to a given ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.9k
7 votes
Accepted

Word for "fumo" but less thick, thin smoke

This may not be perfect, but consider the verb vaporo as an alternative to fumo. Comparing the underlying nouns vapor and fumus suggests that it is in the right direction. One option to consider is ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
7 votes
Accepted

French and Latin "s'il te/vous plaît"

Plaire (à) has many connotations, some of which overlap with the Latin meanings of placere – to please/be pleasing (to), to enjoy, to be acceptable (to), to like/be liked (by), to be agreeable (to). ...
Penelope's user avatar
  • 8,721
6 votes
Accepted

Is there a difference between the future participle and the supine accusative?

The main difference between the supine and the future participle, as I see it, is that the supine is unambiguous about its expression of purpose, whereas the future participle allows for a wide range ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 20.4k
6 votes

French and Latin "s'il te/vous plaît"

The French verb plaîre is not the DIRECT continuation of placēre, but seems to imply a parallel form *placĕre, or else (as others argue) it derives from the infinitive plaisir, which implies *placīre. ...
fdb's user avatar
  • 17.9k
6 votes
Accepted

Is there a more emphatic version of posse?

One sometimes finds valere + infinitive used with the sense of 'to have the ability or power to' (OLD definition 6). I'm not sure it really has more gravity than posse; at any rate, I tend to think ...
cnread's user avatar
  • 20.4k
6 votes

What does [ὀλίγου] ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην actually MEAN?

Montanari (an iPad app, in Italian) - you will need sense 2 medio (2 middle: forget, forget about); also available online in English (subscription only). It's called the middle voice.
Alex B.'s user avatar
  • 11.7k
6 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

I've already commented on this, but I'll add this as (another) partial answer: ósculo is a learned borrowing from Latin from osculum, rather than having been descended from its Latin origin in ...
varro's user avatar
  • 4,698
5 votes
Accepted

ergo vs. itaque

Itaque and ergo are both classified as consecutive and conclusive. A simple distinction would be to state that ergo has a logical meaning, and itaque a consequential meaning in a wider (...
piscator's user avatar
  • 606
5 votes
Accepted

Can adjectives describe any noun in a sentence?

That's a large question! Whole books were written on Latin prose composition in the days when it was taken seriously in teaching the subject. In principle, yes, you can do as you suggest, but there ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.2k
5 votes

French and Latin "s'il te/vous plaît"

We can find the many meanings of s'il te plaît in the Littré above the article PLAIRE. They are: Vouloir, trouver bon E.g.: Heureux, si vous voulez, malheureux, s'il vous plaît (in Tartuffe by ...
Luc's user avatar
  • 2,332
5 votes

French and Latin "s'il te/vous plaît"

The Latin verb placere is certainly used as you suggest, but I think that its use tends to be formal rather than familiar (for instance, the Senate would be asked if it "pleased" to accept a ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
  • 18.2k
5 votes

What's the difference between nam and enim?

I was recently reading Karl Gottlob Zumpt's excellent Grammar of the Latin Language, which contains an extensive section on conjunctions and their differences (pp. 250ff). His distinctions are ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.9k
5 votes
Accepted

What to call an old people's service home?

As mentioned by kkm, there are multiple levels of senior care in the United States. I actually volunteer often enough at one such facility. At this place there are three tiers of care available. ...
Sam K's user avatar
  • 3,998
5 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between present and perfect conjunctive in hesitation?

Pinkster in the Oxford Latin Syntax (pp. 492ff.) discusses this question, but finds no clear answer. He considers three explanations: (a) there is a difference in meaning, specifically a difference of ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.5k
5 votes

How to use immo?

I always read immo as signifying emphatic denial, though what this means in different contexts may differ: Is he alive? NO! He's very much dead! Or: So you hate him? NO! I make sacrifices every night ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
  • 16.6k
5 votes

Word for "fumo" but less thick, thin smoke

Not a single word, but a relevant passage from Ovid Metamorphoses 1.569-72: ...per quae Peneos ab imo effusus Pindo spumosis volvitur undis, deiectuque gravi tenues agitantia fumos nubila ...
TKR's user avatar
  • 31.5k
5 votes

Word for "fumo" but less thick, thin smoke

Fumo, -are is a general word for something that is causing smoke or steam. I cannot find a specialized word that refers to "thin smoke," but one alternative for incense is cremo, -are ("...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 41.9k
5 votes
Accepted

What does [ὀλίγου] ἐμαυτοῦ ἐπελαθόμην actually MEAN?

Ἐμαυτοῦ is straightforward: it's a genitive singular reflexive pronoun, "of myself". Ἐπελαθόμην is more interesting. This is the first-person singular aorist active indicative of ἐπι-λανθάνομαι. ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 68.3k
5 votes

Was "oscŭlum" a cultured word in Latin?

This is an answer to your bonus question. Yes, there are a number of kissing words in Latin. Based on basium there are basiolum ("little kiss") and basiatio ("the act of kissing", also "kiss" by ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible