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7

Although I believe that tony's suggestion of vir ingeniosus would work pretty well, I do think one would want to use the superlative degree of the adjective (vir ingeniosissimus or vir maxime ingeniosus), since 'genius' goes beyond garden-variety cleverness or talent that the positive degree suggests. Another, related possibility is to use a noun phrase such ...


6

Oxford gives "genius" = "vir ingeniosus" (English-to-Latin); checking the corresponding (Latin-to-English), adjective, "ingeniosus" = "clever", "ingenious"; "naturally suited to...".


9

You'll have to choose different words for precise meanings. One option is to use the intensifier ipse (which is functionally what "very" is doing in your third example). The dictionary gives a good analogue to your examples: ea enim ipsa hora acceperam tuas litteras, "For it was at this very hour that I received your letter." (Cic. Fam. ...


4

Maybe something like: "numerus vitiosus factus" or "numerus vitiose factus" literally: "a defective quantity having been made" or "a quantity having been made defectively" It appears that the word "factus" alone can imply a made quantity- at least in the case of olive oil production, so one could potentially ...


6

(This is an answer about the meaning of the original Hebrew phrase, since the OP suggested in comments that such an answer would be useful.) As the question indicates, the Hebrew phrase being translated as universis animantibus quae moventur is וּבְכָל־חַיָּ֖ה הָֽרֹמֶ֥שֶׂת uvekhol khaya haromeset. (I'm using a simplified/Modern Hebrew transcription in this ...


9

According to Döderlein's Hand-book of Latin Synonymes (also here), canere is the more general term for music (and thus may be used for singing), whereas cantare usually is used more specifically to refer to vocal music: Canere (from καναχεῖν) means, in the most general sense, to make music, voce, tibiis, fidibus, like μέλπειν; cantare, with vocal music, ...


5

One way to express that would be: Omnia possibilia sunt. All things are possible. This actually comes from the Vulgate, where Jesus said: Apud homines hoc inpossibile est, apud Deum autem omnia possibilia sunt. (Mateus 19:26) With men this is impossible; with God, however, all things are possible. Everything vs. anything: Concerning your comment about ...


14

A good source for election-related vocabulary will probably be the Commentariolum Petitionis, written by Quintus Tullius Cicero for the benefit of his more famous brother Marcus ahead of the latter's successful bid for the consulate (presumably, but the authenticity is questionable—it is possible the text was actually written by an unknown post-Augustean ...


13

Although the English word comes from Latin (through the Romance languages), Latin uses a different word. The Latin word actually does appear in English, but in a different meaning. The starting point is the verb ambire, literally "to go around". (Although derived from ire, this verb seems to follow the fourth conjugation.) It is used very commonly ...


5

There is an official English translation at the link you provided (labelled "EN" at the top right-hand side), which gives "as need arises and in the light of experience" as the official Vatican translation of this phrase. Translated overly literally, it means "according as necessity carries and experience counsels".


9

The two words in the Vulgate are very literal translations of the words in the Greek original, which has ἐκ τῶν μνημείων [ek tōn mnēmeiōn] in 27:53 and ἀπέναντι τοῦ τάφου [apenanti tou tafou] in 27:61. Since μνημεῖον [mnēmeion] is etymologically related to μνήμη [mnēmē, "memory"], it is translated monumentum ["tomb, memorial", from moneo],...


7

The present active participle of trado is tradens – "handing down" when used adjectively, or "one who hands down" when used as a noun. This leads to English tradent in the same way we get nouns like correspondent or adjectives like incipient.


8

First of all, umbra must be in the accusative case, so it has to be umbram iaciam. As to the correctness of the phrase, it is in fact classical: Lewis & Short have meaning I.B.5. of iacio as "To project as a shadow" giving the reference “nullam umbram,” Plin. 2, 73, 75, § 183 sq.


5

Here's my translation of the French, though it's not strictly relevant to the answer: *ἐγγεινομαι (ἐγγείνωνται) to engender, generate, Hom. Il.19.26 - Verb formed by prefixing of the aorist stem γεν-, from γίγνομαι 'to be born', which undergoes metrical lengthening written γειν-. The prefix ἐν- gives the verb an active meaning, the semantics therefore ...


2

There's Dr Ammondt singing Elvis songs in Latin, for some idea of how picking up modern terms and usage might work. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=II5Zvt6xJ-g


16

You seem to be addressing several issues in this question. To start from the bottom line: Latin is already being used right now as a daily casual language. Not even a small reserve about this statement. The external world changes, and new words are born. It happens in every language and Latin is no exception to that. New words are finally integrated into the ...


13

Latin is used regularly within the Vatican and Catholic Church, so depending on what you mean by daily usage I think that fulfills that requirement. There are also a lot of loan words that make their way into modern Latin, both historically and currently. For example, Vicipaedia, the Latin version of Wikipedia. Latin is also used regularly on this site for ...


9

Yes, μαθητεία is a word that would certainly be understood in this context, though in practice it was usual to talk about someone being a μαθητής to someone rather than about μαθητεία in the abstract. This applies not just in the context of manual craftsmanship but for any τέχνη, including e.g. rhetoric.


2

Universal human laziness would have favored dropping the voiceless velar before the voiced dental. Under rapid speech, I don't think the /k/ sound would survive long. You don't always need a universal sound change rule for every change in a language. Some changes are bound to be random or unique. That's the second law of thermodynamics (which takes ...


3

When I first saw this text it too struck me as unclear and unnatural. The first problem has since been resolved, the second however remains. Another reply mentions Foster himself translating it as 'Insert your card--scidulam--so you can access the operations allowed.' - that's certainly not an exact rendering of what the Latin says, which is instead: "...


5

Ricus and riccus show up in late Medieval and Humanist Latin, but they're certainly backports from French and Italian, not pre-Medieval loans. The various Romance cognates of rich are actually believed to represent three separate borrowings from three separate Germanic languages: Italian ricco is the most telling one, because it has a geminated consonant, ...


20

The source of this Latin ATM message, as confirmed is a few profiles (such as this one from the Catholic Herald and this one from The Telegraph) is the lately-deceased Reginald Foster, who was arguably one of the greatest Latin speakers of the past century. The Vatican Diaries, pg. 196 quotes Foster's own translation: The elevator whirred quietly to the top ...


4

With respect to (3) (4), I think it is very tempting to have congnosco to denote an active action that the user should do. So my guess it can be rendered identify or more freely on the context select. I read ratio faciunda as method of operation (method to be done). So the user is required to insert the card so that he can select a method from several ...


5

The message is indeed hard to parse because of the broad meanings of ratio, facere, and cognoscere. I am not sure whether there can be a very solid and authoritative answer, so I will just share my view. I think the future imperative is simply used for sollemnity. I would not understand it referring to the future but just promoting the register of the text ...


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