25 votes
Accepted

How do you translate "Don't Fear the Reaper" into Latin?

Neither is correct, and timetere isn't a real Latin word. A correct translation depends somewhat on whether the command is directed at one person (e.g., you, the bearer of the tattoo) or the world at ...
cnread's user avatar
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22 votes
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Translation of a phrase "Catch the moment, ..." to Latin

There is a well-known Latin equivalent in fairly common use : carpe diem (literally, 'seize the day), taken from Horace, Odes 1.11. The full phrase is carpe diem quam minimum credula postero, implying ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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19 votes

Please help translate this short Latin phrase left behind by a deceased man

Pray to God but row away from the rocks. You are correct in that ora means "pray" (it is the singular imperative of oro). Deo (dative of Deus) is the "to God" bit. Sed means "but," ab saxis (ablative ...
Sam K's user avatar
  • 3,998
19 votes

How do you translate "Don't Fear the Reaper" into Latin?

When (Sir) Terry Pratchett was knighted, he chose this phrase as his heraldic motto. The official translation in that context is Noli Timere Messorem. This isn't the most natural word order (which ...
Draconis's user avatar
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16 votes
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How to say "not safe for work" in Latin?

I would translate "not safe" with inconveniens or haud opportunus. I have always found "work" difficult to translate, since it reflects a post-industrial cultural division between "work" and "life" ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.7k
16 votes

Translating "Father knows beer best" into Latin

I'd go for a wordplay: Pater optime cerevisiam sapit Just as the other answers, pater is straightforwardly father The verb sapio means both to taste and to know/understand. Hence sapit is the ...
Rafael's user avatar
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15 votes

How to say "everything will be good" in Latin?

The verb cadere ('to fall'), when paired with an adverb (or when its subject is paired with an adjective), can mean 'to turn out (in the manner denoted by the adverb/adjective)' – for example: quis ...
cnread's user avatar
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15 votes
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Tastes Like Chicken

Gusto/gustare means to taste, but in the sense of someone having a taste of something. The verb you are looking for, IMO is sapio/sapire. It can be accompanied by a noun in the accusative case to ...
Rafael's user avatar
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13 votes
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Translation of a passage related to the crusades

This quote is from the Historia Ierusalem Baldrici Dolensis Archiepiscopi, Book 2 (pg. 1092 of Migne, Patrologia Latina, CLXVI). Your quote is only a fragment of the relevant sentence, which is ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.7k
13 votes

Is "servos" accusative plural in Plautus's "is est servos ipse" and, if that's the case, why does "esse" takes accusative case there?

To expand a little on Joonas's answer, the nominative singular ending in Latin was originally /os/ for all masculine nouns of the second declension, which developed to /us/ as part of a more general ...
Asteroides's user avatar
13 votes

Shorter translation of "As above, so below"

The phrase you are looking for is either of these: Ut supra, sic infra. Ut supra, ita infra. They both mean the same thing. I think the first one sounds better. I just searched a bit for these on ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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13 votes
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Are plural Latin participles sometimes translated singular? E.g., "peregratis" in Acts 19:1

Because peragratis is a passive participle, it does not mean "having passed through", but instead means "having been passed through". Therefore, it can't be used as a modifier of ...
Asteroides's user avatar
13 votes

Can someone help translating "one must die for one to live"

One possibility: necesse est alterum mori ut alter vivat. It's necessary that one (of the two) die in order that the other live. A variation: ut alter vivat necesse est ut alter moriatur. In order ...
cnread's user avatar
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12 votes

Is "servos" accusative plural in Plautus's "is est servos ipse" and, if that's the case, why does "esse" takes accusative case there?

It is servŏs in both instances, not servōs. The old form of the nominative has the ending -os instead of the later -us. What you see is indeed the singular nominative, but not in the form ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

Is "sentire omnia" the correct way to say "feel everything"?

Sentire is an infinitive, corresponding to the English "to" form. So sentire omnia by itself means "to feel everything" (depending on context, one might translate it differently). ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
12 votes

"Let the fu—rs rot"

First, this let is translated as the present subjunctive (as in “let there be light” – fiat lux from fieri, to be made, to come into existence). Second, defututus means – well – to quote Lewis & ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
12 votes

How can I properly translate possessive form of nouns?

In general, don't focus on every word having an equivalent in the other language. For example, the single word magistrō would generally be translated into multiple words like "to the master"....
Draconis's user avatar
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11 votes
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'Quae pars anterior quae posterior jure habeatur in toto genere non liquet': taxonomical description of Antarctissa denticulata (Ehrenberg 1844)

I would translate the boldfaced sentence as It is not clear which part would be rightfully considered the front and which part the rear in the whole genus. For creatures of that appearance, that ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
11 votes

"Nil virtus generosa timet"

The motto calls upon connotations and associations in Latin that are hard to evoke in an analogous way in English. So here is a clumsy translation followed by some exposition of generosus and virtus ...
Ben Kovitz's user avatar
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11 votes
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Ablative considered as an accusative

The Latin you provide is actually incomplete (though not incomprehensible). The English translation is not accurate at all. The quote in question, which appears in the L&S entry for scribo, ...
brianpck's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

Correct paraphrase of "navigare necesse est" to "angling is necessary"?

In Latin, "fish" is piscor, -ari, -atus sum, a first conjugation deponent verb. The form you use, piscantur, is third person plural. It means "they fish." The original phrase is a later Latin ...
brianpck's user avatar
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11 votes
Accepted

Cicero sentence

Note the forms of the other verbs in this passage: Ex patriis ritibus optuma colunto. From the ancient rites, let the best be cultivated. This is a third-person imperative, something we don't have ...
Draconis's user avatar
  • 67k
11 votes
Accepted

"Let the fu—rs rot"

My vote would go for: Fellatores in malam crucem Unlike some of the other suggestions you might come across, fellator ("sucker") is an attested obscenity. It seems to be a favorite of ...
cmw's user avatar
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10 votes

I do what I want VS Quid me vis facere VS Facio quod volo

I would venture to suggest an emendation of your first option: Facio quod velim. Or, to amend the order in a way that sounds more fluent to my ear: Quod velim facio. The difference is that velim ...
brianpck's user avatar
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10 votes
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How to say "I live for my family" in Latin?

I'd suggest something like Familiam ad sustinendam vivo. Literally translated, this means something like "I live for the sustaining of my family." Latin word order is pretty free, so putting familiam (...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

Hominem super hominem

The word futuraram is not well-formed: the closest correct form is futurarum (feminine genitive plural) but actually futurorum (masculine genitive plural) is the only form that seems to make sense in ...
brianpck's user avatar
  • 40.7k
10 votes
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Alea iacta est, plural version?

The plural would be aleae iactae sunt. Alea / aleae is nominative, because it's the subject of a passive verb-form. Note that, if you used the accusative case for alea, the verb would have to be in ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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10 votes
Accepted

What does "Attero Dominatus" mean?

The official translation is off. I am rather annoyed that people put time and money into projects like this but do not take more care with the translation of a name — but I refrain from ranting ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
10 votes
Accepted

"Opusculum hoc, quamdiu vixero, doctioribus emendandum offero."?

Hoc (here hoc is simply 'this.') opusculum This little work, , quamdiu vixero, for as long as I shall live, doctioribus (here dative after offero) to those more learned emendandum offero I offer ...
Hugh's user avatar
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10 votes
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Struggling to translate "iuvenum" in a sentence

This is all about how thousands work in Latin. The singular mille is an undeclinable adjective, the plural milia is a third declension noun. When you are counting the youth, with mille the young are ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar

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