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22

Neither is correct, and timetere isn't a real Latin word. A correct translation depends somewhat on whether the command is directed at one person (e.g., you, the bearer of the tattoo) or the world at large (e.g., those who see the tattoo). For the former case (audience = one person), you could say Noli messorem timere or Ne messorem timueris. Ne messorem ...


16

Indeed, you can leave out the verb "to be" in both Latin and Greek. But I have one issue with your translation. φίλος is not a noun meaning "love". It is either an adjective meaning "dear" (or "beloved") or a substantive meaning "friend". The noun meaning "love" would be φιλία. (Keep in mind there are many words for love, each having its own nuance.) ...


16

E unum pluribus has just the same meaning as the original (though you might better use the ex form of the preposition when it precedes a vowel). The reverse, 'many out of one', would merely require the cases to be reversed, giving ex uno plures.


16

Your suggestions are not quite right, and they might in fact be badly misunderstood. There are two things to consider here. The first one is simple. Omnia is plural and the verb must agree. Omnia (ex)urunt is grammatically valid. The second and more complicated thing is ergativity. Some English verbs behave ergatively, meaning that the one experiencing the ...


15

As an adjective, indeed, medius, -a, -um does not take a genitive. However, there is a noun, the substantive medium, -i, which also means "middle" or "midst." Referring to a physical space, it's fairly common during the Augustan era and later, and, yes, it can take a genitive. Compare this passage of Livy 37.13.10: insidiis medio ferme viae positis ...


15

Latin doesn't have a single standardized orthography. The spelling "perfectio" is a fine way to write the Latin word for "perfection". In fact, a number of people would prefer "perfectio" over "perfectiō". I would not recommend using a macron in a slogan, especially since you are also spelling the word jacet with the letter J. This isn't incorrect from a ...


15

When (Sir) Terry Pratchett was knighted, he chose this phrase as his heraldic motto. The official translation in that context is Noli Timere Messorem. This isn't the most natural word order (which would be noli messorem timere), but the meaning is the same: a command to a single person, "do not fear the reaper".


14

Yes, the grammar of this sentence is perfectly fine. It's a very simple sentence composed of subject, object and verb. Sentence Outline Subject: Sola dea - The subject needs to be nominative here. Remember that even though two Latin words may be translated with the same English words (so dea and deam are both translated "goddess"), that does not mean that ...


14

If you want to preserve the V-V-V structure of the original, you could do: Veni, Vidi, Verberavi This translates to "I came, I saw, I beat people."


13

First I must object to this horrible story. My abduction to your overworld by Hercules was illegal, and I am still angry at Pluto for it! That said, I think your translation "heard stories about" is fine, although "stories" sometimes suggests something a bit more exciting or adventurous than fama does: it may be an account of something or someone, a story, ...


12

Christus Apostolos misit ... illis Evangelii nuntiandi praebens mandatum Praebens is a participle modifying Christus: "Christ sent the apostles ... giving...". All the other words you marked depend on praebens. The dative illis is the recipient of praebens: "giving them". The neuter past participle mandatum is used as a noun and is the object of praebens: ...


12

The best phrase would be Deus optimus maximus, literally “God [is] best and greatest”. Not only is the meaning right but it has an ancient lineage which makes it perfect for this use. Iuppiter optimus maximus is a standard pagan formula for Jupiter. Christianity took this phrase over and the dedication Deo optimo maximo, “To God, best and greatest”, ...


12

Domitor (without the -um, which is unnecessary here) would be a breaker in the sense of a breaker of wild horses. It doesn't have to do with physical breaking, which is what you want. Instead, you can use a derivative of a verb such as frangere – e.g., fractor. Though this word is unattested (at least in classical Latin), it's easy enough to derive it. You ...


11

Sola dea is the subject, and the subject must be nominative. Fatum is in the accusative, and not the nominative, and must be, since sola dea is in the nominative. It's the direct object, and the accusative is the case for direct objects. I think you just had your terminology mixed up. Finally, novit is perfect, not infinitive, of noscere, which is the ...


11

It's not even close. Of the words, only numquam is the right word. As good as Google Translate is for other languages, it's not good at all for Latin. A quick and dirty translation would go something like this: De prosperis numquam somniavi; immo eis laboravi. You have some options for "success," but I think prospera works nicely in the phrase here. ...


11

In Latin, "fish" is piscor, -ari, -atus sum, a first conjugation deponent verb. The form you use, piscantur, is third person plural. It means "they fish." The original phrase is a later Latin translation of Plutarch's Greek translation of what Pompey said, presumably in Latin: "πλεῖν ἀνάγκη, ζῆν οὐκ ἀνάγκη." Navigare is active infinitive: "to sail." The ...


11

My suggestion is: Rami universi ex una radice. Literally, this means "all the branches from the same root". There is no need for an explicit verb, especially for a motto. There are a couple of choices here I wish to point out explicitly: The wording is compact so as to fit a motto. I used chiastic word order to highlight the branches and the root at the ...


11

No, it isn't correct. Veni, adfui, abii — literally I came, I was there, I went away.


11

Because Google Translate is wrong. It does not, (or not only) use the dictionary meaning of words, but learns phrases in context. In many cases this can help create a natural translation but (especially for short phrases out of context) it can lead to nonsense. Nescire ("ne scire") means "to not know". Scio me nescire is literally "I know myself to not ...


11

It is great that you looked up so many proposed translations! The many routes taken reflect the difficulty of translating well and the necessity to choose goals for the translation. Google Translate is unreliable with Latin; for detailed analysis and mockery, see the linked question. The original quote is a line from a poem written in dactylic hexameter. ...


10

Yes, depending on the type of wall. Rūpēs, -is is a third-declension feminine noun derived from rumpō "break, split". It means a rock which is split apart or has a smooth face; I've seen it translated as "cliff", "canyon", or just plain "rock" (e.g. rūpēs Tarpeia is "the Tarpeian Rock"). Rectus, -a, -um started as the past participle of regō "to keep ...


10

Yes, it's possible, but that's not the typical construction. 'Therefore' is the best translation in this spot, starting a whole new clause that isn't immediately dependent (in a meaningful sense, rather than in a grammatical sense) on the previous clause. In that respect, it's closer to igitur. I checked Smith's English-Latin dictionary for the comparative ...


10

I give some real examples taken from medieval latin: ex his praemissis haec sequitur conclusio (Saint Lawrence of Brindisi) sequitur ex praemissis ista conclusio (Ockham) haec / ista conclusio sequitur ex praemissis (Ockham) ex praedictis praemissis sequitur ista conclusio (Ockham) conclusio sequitur ex talibus praemissis (Ockham) ...


10

Here is a literal translation: John Duns Scotus, OFM, who in his Oxford lectures represented that famous line of David, "the Lord is my light," is commemorated by this stone placed by his brothers after seven hundred years in AD 1966. OFM is the abbreviation (still used today) for Ordo Fratrum Minorum, "the order of friars minor," i.e. Franciscans. Illud ...


10

I think crescere is an excellent word for growing, be it concrete or spiritual. Check its dictionary entry in Lewis and Short. It can be used in sentences like "I grow to be a better person" and "the pumpkin grows". If you want "I grow pumpkins", the word crescere is not suitable. It is intransitive and the subject is the one to grow. If you want something ...


9

The sentence, absent any context (could you provide some?), would ordinarily be translated The Goddess alone knows [their, or his, or her, etc.] fate. Let's break it down word by word: Sola: Nominative singular, first declension, feminine; agreeing with dea. dea: Nominative singular; it's the subject (in this case, the actor) of the sentence. fatum: ...


9

Here's another approach: Dīxistī mihi quidlibet in mundō licitum esse, Ad saltātrīcēs prōtinus adspiciō! In what I've read—mostly elementary materials—you can just skip the conjunction or adverb, and go straight to the follow-up sentence or clause. In the above, I've also switched from past tense to present tense, the present tense in Latin having ...


9

Google Translate is notoriously bad with Latin. It seems to have little understanding of Latin grammar. If you only want single words, you are much better off using an online Latin dictionary of your choice. I do not know an online service (or any computerized tool) that translates Latin reliably. The Latin phrase capere semper in posterum means roughly "to ...


9

I think you may be overthinking this a bit: this particular meaning of audire is idiomatic, but derives pretty directly from the base meaning. I think the bolding of the L&S entry gives somewhat the wrong idea of the construction, as if one could say: "Audio Brianus" = "I am named Brian." By far the most common usage of this idiom is with an adverb, ...


9

I think quidem is wrong here, as it is an adverb. You can confirm this on the Lewis and Short dictionary. Also, you need to keep the ablative phrase "ex nihilo" (you changed it to "ex quidem"). I would use this phrase: aliquid ex nihilo fit. I'm using the word "aliquid" to mean "something", but there might be better choices.


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