26

Google Translate is unreliable with Latin and you should not take anything it gives seriously. The suggestion non insectum opus est sounds like "an insect is not work". I am not aware of good Latin words for "bug" or "feature". Therefore I would take a different approach and suggest: Non forte sed ratione. Not by chance but by ...


23

Neither is correct, and timetere isn't a real Latin word. A correct translation depends somewhat on whether the command is directed at one person (e.g., you, the bearer of the tattoo) or the world at large (e.g., those who see the tattoo). For the former case (audience = one person), you could say Noli messorem timere or Ne messorem timueris. Ne messorem ...


23

That's not a simple question, because this is not a real sentence Perditianus on Reddit pointed out on May 16 that this is exactly what Google Translate gives for “Live free or America dies”. So it seems likely that this piece of text was not composed in Latin by any human author. I don’t think “What does this mean” is a clear question when applied to a ...


20

As the other answers indicate, this is nonsense. But I think it would be helpful to provide (1) a parsing of the nonsense Latin, and (2) a good translation of the intended phrase. Parsing of nonsense Latin vivamus: 1st person plural subjunctive, "let us live" vel: (inclusive) "or" libero: this can either by the 1st person of libero ("I deliver/free") or ...


16

Indeed, you can leave out the verb "to be" in both Latin and Greek. But I have one issue with your translation. φίλος is not a noun meaning "love". It is either an adjective meaning "dear" (or "beloved") or a substantive meaning "friend". The noun meaning "love" would be φιλία. (Keep in mind there are many words for love, each having its own nuance.) ...


16

E unum pluribus has just the same meaning as the original (though you might better use the ex form of the preposition when it precedes a vowel). The reverse, 'many out of one', would merely require the cases to be reversed, giving ex uno plures.


16

When (Sir) Terry Pratchett was knighted, he chose this phrase as his heraldic motto. The official translation in that context is Noli Timere Messorem. This isn't the most natural word order (which would be noli messorem timere), but the meaning is the same: a command to a single person, "do not fear the reaper".


16

Your suggestions are not quite right, and they might in fact be badly misunderstood. There are two things to consider here. The first one is simple. Omnia is plural and the verb must agree. Omnia (ex)urunt is grammatically valid. The second and more complicated thing is ergativity. Some English verbs behave ergatively, meaning that the one experiencing the ...


16

The Latin verb futuere is a good translation for the English verb "fuck" in the sense of sexual intercourse. The past participle fututus means "fucked" in this sense. As often in Latin, this can be intensified with a prefix. The adjective defututus can well be translated as "totally fucked", although many dictionaries give much softer translations like "...


16

Nothing. I think it's Google Translate nonsense, but it's perplexing that it'd find its way to a cover. The results may depend on the user, but I get these translations: Live Free or Die: America > Free aut mori; Americae Live free or Die: America > Liberum vivere aut mori; Americae Live Free or die: America > Free aut mori; Americae Live free or die: ...


16

This one was mentioned in the linked question and appears to be still valid: dolor sit amet > "carrots" This translation is marked as verified by community and no other options are given. These three Latin words are from the nonsensical lorem ipsum text often used for placeholders. The words are all valid Latin but don't make a sensible ...


15

As an adjective, indeed, medius, -a, -um does not take a genitive. However, there is a noun, the substantive medium, -i, which also means "middle" or "midst." Referring to a physical space, it's fairly common during the Augustan era and later, and, yes, it can take a genitive. Compare this passage of Livy 37.13.10: insidiis medio ferme ...


15

Yes, the grammar of this sentence is perfectly fine. It's a very simple sentence composed of subject, object and verb. Sentence Outline Subject: Sola dea - The subject needs to be nominative here. Remember that even though two Latin words may be translated with the same English words (so dea and deam are both translated "goddess"), that does not mean that ...


15

Latin doesn't have a single standardized orthography. The spelling "perfectio" is a fine way to write the Latin word for "perfection". In fact, a number of people would prefer "perfectio" over "perfectiō". I would not recommend using a macron in a slogan, especially since you are also spelling the word jacet with the letter J. This isn't incorrect from a ...


14

If you want to preserve the V-V-V structure of the original, you could do: Veni, Vidi, Verberavi This translates to "I came, I saw, I beat people."


14

The best phrase would be Deus optimus maximus, literally “God [is] best and greatest”. Not only is the meaning right but it has an ancient lineage which makes it perfect for this use. Iuppiter optimus maximus is a standard pagan formula for Jupiter. Christianity took this phrase over and the dedication Deo optimo maximo, “To God, best and greatest”, ...


14

Personally, I'd simplify somewhat and use an impersonal passive: hinc illuc non (per)venitur, 'There is no arriving to that place from this place.' Or, I'd use what you've done but change the verb to possis to indicate a generic 'you' (i.e., 'one'). Otherwise, I believe what you've done is correct. The pairing of hinc and illuc in this way is well attested. ...


14

As Expedito Bipes says, via is probably a better word for "path" than semita in this context. I'm going to suggest a different verb: Memento viae tuae. Memento means "to mind" in the sense of "be mindful of something", or "remember" (which is how it's most often translated). So the above phrase could be translated &...


13

First I must object to this horrible story. My abduction to your overworld by Hercules was illegal, and I am still angry at Pluto for it! That said, I think your translation "heard stories about" is fine, although "stories" sometimes suggests something a bit more exciting or adventurous than fama does: it may be an account of something or someone, a story, ...


13

Domitor (without the -um, which is unnecessary here) would be a breaker in the sense of a breaker of wild horses. It doesn't have to do with physical breaking, which is what you want. Instead, you can use a derivative of a verb such as frangere – e.g., fractor. Though this word is unattested (at least in classical Latin), it's easy enough to derive it. You ...


13

As Joonas said, I would use a form of the participle fututus, literally "fucked". Here's one example, from Catullus VI: Cur? Nōn tam later' ecfutūta pandās, nī tu quid faciās ineptiārum Why? Because you wouldn't display your fucked-out body like this unless you were doing something obscene. (In this poem, Catullus is saying it's obvious that ...


13

I would translate it as: Custodi viam tuam The word semita denotes a narrow path and is probably not what you're looking for. I believe via would be a better fit, because it's often used in a more abstract sense to signify something like the path of life. Cicero for example used via as part of an expression meaning the right path of life: ...non nulli ...


12

Christus Apostolos misit ... illis Evangelii nuntiandi praebens mandatum Praebens is a participle modifying Christus: "Christ sent the apostles ... giving...". All the other words you marked depend on praebens. The dative illis is the recipient of praebens: "giving them". The neuter past participle mandatum is used as a noun and is the object of praebens: ...


12

It is great that you looked up so many proposed translations! The many routes taken reflect the difficulty of translating well and the necessity to choose goals for the translation. Google Translate is unreliable with Latin; for detailed analysis and mockery, see the linked question. The original quote is a line from a poem written in dactylic hexameter. ...


12

No, that is not accurate. First, when a wheel is “breaking” in English, it is not breaking something else (transitively). It is also not being broken by something else (passively). It just breaks on its own; this is called the middle voice, and while it is expressed by the active verb form in English, it has to be the passive form in Latin. Second, the ...


11

Sola dea is the subject, and the subject must be nominative. Fatum is in the accusative, and not the nominative, and must be, since sola dea is in the nominative. It's the direct object, and the accusative is the case for direct objects. I think you just had your terminology mixed up. Finally, novit is perfect, not infinitive, of noscere, which is the ...


11

It's not even close. Of the words, only numquam is the right word. As good as Google Translate is for other languages, it's not good at all for Latin. A quick and dirty translation would go something like this: De prosperis numquam somniavi; immo eis laboravi. You have some options for "success," but I think prospera works nicely in the phrase here. ...


11

In Latin, "fish" is piscor, -ari, -atus sum, a first conjugation deponent verb. The form you use, piscantur, is third person plural. It means "they fish." The original phrase is a later Latin translation of Plutarch's Greek translation of what Pompey said, presumably in Latin: "πλεῖν ἀνάγκη, ζῆν οὐκ ἀνάγκη." Navigare is active infinitive: "to sail." The ...


11

My suggestion is: Rami universi ex una radice. Literally, this means "all the branches from the same root". There is no need for an explicit verb, especially for a motto. There are a couple of choices here I wish to point out explicitly: The wording is compact so as to fit a motto. I used chiastic word order to highlight the branches and the root at the ...


11

No, it isn't correct. Veni, adfui, abii — literally I came, I was there, I went away.


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