26

These are the exact same word, and yes both mean "world" but no you cannot substitute them for each other. Latin is a fully inflexional language, which means that the words have endings which change depending on their grammatical use. You can compare mundum and mundi to whom and whose. You wouldn't say, "This is me ball" (well, not in Standard English, at ...


18

It's the former, curricula vitae. As the article linked in Wikipedia points out, vitarum would indicate that there are multiple lives mentioned per each curriculum. However, vitae as a genitive is describing the type of curriculum, and curriculum itself is the object that needs to be singular or plural. This isn't so confusing if you plug it back into ...


16

If you want to say "night bird" with the words "night" (nox) and "bird" (avis), you should say "bird of the night", avis noctis. When you decline this expression, noctis (of the night) remains in the genitive case whereas avis takes the required case. A more Latin way would be to use an adjective. I would go with nocturnus (nightly, nocturnal or nighttime). ...


15

Latin doesn't have a single standardized orthography. The spelling "perfectio" is a fine way to write the Latin word for "perfection". In fact, a number of people would prefer "perfectio" over "perfectiō". I would not recommend using a macron in a slogan, especially since you are also spelling the word jacet with the letter J. This isn't incorrect from a ...


15

Yes, dies mirabilis is perfectly valid! You can use the adjective mirabilis with any noun. You have to use the correct form, but that is fortunately easy. In masculine and feminine it's mirabilis, in neuter it's mirabile. Some words are plural (e.g. Kalendae, the first day of a month), and those require plural forms mirabiles/mirabilia. If you find a word ...


14

The expression esse est percipi is grammatical. Notice that the gerund does not have a nominative form at all. If you want the corresponding nominative (or accusative when there is no preposition), you need to use infinitive. The grammatical structure is the same as in giraffa est alta ("the giraffe is tall"). You are simply saying that something is ...


14

Yes, the grammar of this sentence is perfectly fine. It's a very simple sentence composed of subject, object and verb. Sentence Outline Subject: Sola dea - The subject needs to be nominative here. Remember that even though two Latin words may be translated with the same English words (so dea and deam are both translated "goddess"), that does not mean that ...


14

You should use a distributive. Cicero, ad Atticum, 5. 3: ibi mihi tuae litterae binae redditae sunt tertio abs te die This works for all such plural nouns, but you should take care over the case and gender. As with some larger cardinal numbers, it's a common mistake to forget that. [Additional clarification] Unae litterae is not necessarily as wrong as ...


14

Two key mechanisms of disambiguation come to mind: Using hic (latter) and ille (former) is one way. Simple example: "A and B meet. The former eats, the latter drinks." — A et B conveniunt. Ille est, hic bibit. The pronoun se/suus usually refers to the subject of the sentence. Simple example: "B wrote a book. A compares his own book with B's." — ...


13

The Latin word used for "world" here is mundus. This word has several forms (singular/plural): nominative: mundus/mundi accusative: mundum/mundos genitive: mundi/mundorum dative: mundo/mundis ablative: mundo/mundis The five grammatical cases are used in different contexts and they are rarely interchangeable. Two examples: "Of the world" requires ...


12

Unfortunately, it seems that people have tried for centuries to answer this question, with limited success or at least limited consistency. For example: In his 1841 Dictionary of Latin Synonymes, Lewis Ramshorn indicates that fourth-declension words derived from the supine "designate permanent conditions," while third-declention words in -tio and -sio ...


12

Though bare-stem compounding is the usual method in Indo-European, compounds with an inflected first member are actually not uncommon in many IE languages. It seems that all cases could be used. For Greek, Smyth (who calls these "flectional compounds") offers the following examples (879): A compound whose first part is a case form, not a stem, is called a ...


12

The noun decursus belongs to the fourth declension, not the second. You know this because, if you look it up in a dictionary, the two forms that are given (the 'principal parts') will be dēcursus, -ūs, not dēcursus, -ī. Therefore, in your passage, decursus is, in fact, accusative, but plural (= dēcursūs).


11

It's agreeing with sōlis, gen. sg. m.


11

Sola dea is the subject, and the subject must be nominative. Fatum is in the accusative, and not the nominative, and must be, since sola dea is in the nominative. It's the direct object, and the accusative is the case for direct objects. I think you just had your terminology mixed up. Finally, novit is perfect, not infinitive, of noscere, which is the ...


11

The Greek - and hence Roman - tradition is to list cases in the order: NOM - GEN etc. Dionysius Thrax (170-90 BCE) is considered to be the first extant record of this system - see a screenshot from Allen and Brink 1980, p. 65 The old order and the new: A case history (btw I strongly recommend this paper - imho it's the best summary of all relevant research ...


10

I'd say you want the present tense. A&G 466, "Present with iam diu etc.": The Present with expressions of duration of time (especially iam diu, iam dudum) denotes an action continuing in the present, but begun in the past... In this use the present is commonly to be rendered by the perfect in English They give examples such as annum iam audis ...


10

Cogito ergo sum does not mean "seeing is believing". It in fact means "I think therefore I am." Decartes used it as a statement of epistemology: If he can think, if he can conjure up rational process, it follows that he must exist. It establishes the I. In Latin, there is no nominative of the gerund. What that means is that you'll never see a gerund as the ...


10

It's a cardinal number, not an ordinal number, in the original Hebrew. Look at the other uses of the same Hebrew phrase: Genesis 1:9 (NIV): And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered to one place, and let dry ground appear.” And it was so. Genesis 2:24 (NIV): That is why a man leaves his father and mother and is united to his wife, and ...


10

Using nimis (or related words) before an adjective strengthens it, but in a specific direction: nimis frigidus is "too cold", not "very cold". You can also reach a similar tone with comparative: frigidior can mean "too cold". I suggest three ways to emphasize an adjective: Superlative: Frigidissimus is a very idiomatic way to say "too cold". The absolute ...


10

The two readings would be distinct in Latin, because the ablative used by itself (without a preposition) generally cannot indicate accompaniment -- you need cum for that -- but does indicate means or instrument. So something like Pulsa agnum cum flore can only mean "Hit the lamb which has the flower", while Pulsa agnum flore can only mean "Hit the lamb using ...


10

You are confusing two words: The noun medium means "center". The adjective medius means "central". In this idiom one goes into "central things". The word res is feminine (the singular nominative and plural accusative happen to look alike), so the adjective has to be in feminine plural accusative: medias. If you were to use the noun medium instead, you ...


10

Manibus coniunctis makes me think of holding one's hands together in prayer. I'd translate this as "manibus nexis". See location 745 in Metamorphoses by Ovid. There it is used in the context of holding hands dancing around a tree.


10

In theory, the feminine of professor would be profestrix. However, this is a rather awkward formation, and isn't attested classically—the use of -trix on a dental-stem noun is incredibly rare in any period. So most often, in my experience at least, the word professor is used for both the masculine and the feminine. If the professor is female, the noun is ...


9

The sentence, absent any context (could you provide some?), would ordinarily be translated The Goddess alone knows [their, or his, or her, etc.] fate. Let's break it down word by word: Sola: Nominative singular, first declension, feminine; agreeing with dea. dea: Nominative singular; it's the subject (in this case, the actor) of the sentence. fatum: ...


9

Your syntax is correct. You can combine as many genitives as you wish in a similar fashion. For choosing between et and -que, see the question about that choice. I think et is more appropriate here. To improve your translation, I would put est all the way at the end: Minerva dea sapientiae et lanae est. Besides being more natural word order in Latin, it ...


9

I have run a quick analysis using data from latinlexicon.org. I included adverbs ending in -ter (about 820). Most end in -iter (the rule). A good number end in -nter (which as you know are formed with syncopation regularly when the base adjective/participle ends in -nt). The remainders are a mix of declinables and indeclinables (e.g., propter is indeclinable ...


9

I would venture to suggest an emendation of your first option: Facio quod velim. Or, to amend the order in a way that sounds more fluent to my ear: Quod velim facio. The difference is that velim is in the subjunctive. Why? Because the relative clause is not talking about "this thing that I want," but rather "whatever I want." The difference is subtle,...


9

It's a regular neuter accusative singular form, modifying aevum: ...you alone of the Italians ventured to unroll all of time... The ablative singular form would be omnī. 'Alone (out) of all the Italians' would be something like unus ex omnibus Italis or unus omnium Italorum. An ablative singular wouldn't work here (even if the form were ablative ...


9

I agree with C. M. Weimer's response and have found three authors who use curricula vitae in their writings. Cicero ante Socratem Democritum Anaxagoram Empedoclem omnes paene veteres, qui nihil cognosci nihil percipi nihil sciri posse dixerunt, angustos sensus imbecillos animos brevia curricula vitae et ut Democritus in profundo veritatem esse demersam......


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