27 votes
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Do *Mundi* and *Mundum* mean different things?

These are the exact same word, and yes both mean "world" but no you cannot substitute them for each other. Latin is a fully inflexional language, which means that the words have endings which change ...
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19 votes
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Latin plural of Curriculum Vitae?

It's the former, curricula vitae. As the article linked in Wikipedia points out, vitarum would indicate that there are multiple lives mentioned per each curriculum. However, vitae as a genitive is ...
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17 votes
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What is the correct way to say "Noctis Avem"?

If you want to say "night bird" with the words "night" (nox) and "bird" (avis), you should say "bird of the night", avis noctis. When you decline this expression, noctis (of the night) remains in the ...
16 votes

What is the logic behind the order of the cases

The Greek - and hence Roman - tradition is to list cases in the order: NOM - GEN etc. Dionysius Thrax (170-90 BCE) is considered to be the first extant record of this system - see a screenshot from ...
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15 votes
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Is the Phrase "Sola Dea Fatum Novit" Proper Latin?

Yes, the grammar of this sentence is perfectly fine. It's a very simple sentence composed of subject, object and verb. Sentence Outline Subject: Sola dea - The subject needs to be nominative here. ...
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15 votes
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Is it acceptable/regular to use diacritics (macron) in written texts?

Latin doesn't have a single standardized orthography. The spelling "perfectio" is a fine way to write the Latin word for "perfection". In fact, a number of people would prefer "perfectio" over "...
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15 votes
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Could we say "dies mirabilis" as we say "annus mirabilis"?

Yes, dies mirabilis is perfectly valid! You can use the adjective mirabilis with any noun. You have to use the correct form, but that is fortunately easy. In masculine and feminine it's mirabilis, in ...
15 votes
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How to say "To serve, not to be served" in Latin?

Welcome to the site! Non ministrari, sed ministrare (VG Mt 20,28) Is a well-attested phrase with that exact meaning. It literally means not to be served but to serve. The context is Jesus in the ...
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15 votes
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Why is this a correct sentence: "Iūlius nōn sōlus, sed cum magnā familiā habitat"?

Although it's possible that the verb est has been omitted here, as Adam says, I find it more likely that the sentence really is equivalent to Iūlius nōn sōlus habitat, sed cum Aemiliā et cum magnā ...
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14 votes
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Is "esse est percipi" grammatical, even with infinitives?

The expression esse est percipi is grammatical. Notice that the gerund does not have a nominative form at all. If you want the corresponding nominative (or accusative when there is no preposition), ...
14 votes
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How do I specify how many "litterae" or "castra" there are?

You should use a distributive. Cicero, ad Atticum, 5. 3: ibi mihi tuae litterae binae redditae sunt tertio abs te die This works for all such plural nouns, but you should take care over the case ...
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14 votes
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Does Latin have a mechanism to disambiguate possessive pronouns of the same gender referring to distinct persons?

Two key mechanisms of disambiguation come to mind: Using hic (latter) and ille (former) is one way. Simple example: "A and B meet. The former eats, the latter drinks." — A et B conveniunt. Ille ...
13 votes
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What is the difference between -us and -io?

Unfortunately, it seems that people have tried for centuries to answer this question, with limited success or at least limited consistency. For example: In his 1841 Dictionary of Latin Synonymes, ...
13 votes

Do *Mundi* and *Mundum* mean different things?

The Latin word used for "world" here is mundus. This word has several forms (singular/plural): nominative: mundus/mundi accusative: mundum/mundos genitive: mundi/mundorum dative: mundo/mundis ...
13 votes
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What cases were used in compounds?

Though bare-stem compounding is the usual method in Indo-European, compounds with an inflected first member are actually not uncommon in many IE languages. It seems that all cases could be used. For ...
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13 votes
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Shouldn't "decursus" be accusative in Psalm 1:3?

The noun decursus belongs to the fourth declension, not the second. You know this because, if you look it up in a dictionary, the two forms that are given (the 'principal parts') will be dēcursus, -ūs,...
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13 votes

Why is Thesaurus Musicarum Latinarum in the feminine?

Simply, it's because musica is a feminine noun. As to why it might be plural, which is a separate question really, it seems here to mean something more akin to "musical arts." This isn't ...
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13 votes

Caesar's use of 'ad equum'

I assume you mean this quote: Quod cum fieret, non inridicule quidam ex militibus X. legionis dixit: plus quam pollicitus esset Caesarem facere; pollicitum se in cohortis praetoriae loco X. legionem ...
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12 votes
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"Ignis solis propinqui"

It's agreeing with sōlis, gen. sg. m.
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12 votes

How to emphasize adjectives?

Using nimis (or related words) before an adjective strengthens it, but in a specific direction: nimis frigidus is "too cold", not "very cold". You can also reach a similar tone ...
12 votes
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Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

You are confusing two words: The noun medium means "center". The adjective medius means "central". In this idiom one goes into "central things". The word res is feminine (the singular nominative and ...
12 votes

Is the phrase professor emerita grammatically correct?

In theory, the feminine of professor would be profestrix. However, this is a rather awkward formation, and isn't attested classically—the use of -trix on a dental-stem noun is incredibly rare in any ...
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12 votes
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Dropping "to be" and other verbs in Latin?

It definitely isn't rare, and it definitely isn't found only in poetry. Any good Latin grammar will address this topic. In Gildersleeve and Lodge, Latin grammar, the index entry for esse includes a ...
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11 votes

Is the Phrase "Sola Dea Fatum Novit" Proper Latin?

Sola dea is the subject, and the subject must be nominative. Fatum is in the accusative, and not the nominative, and must be, since sola dea is in the nominative. It's the direct object, and the ...
  • 41.7k
11 votes

"Dies unus"—non primus?

It's a cardinal number, not an ordinal number, in the original Hebrew. Look at the other uses of the same Hebrew phrase: Genesis 1:9 (NIV): And God said, “Let the water under the sky be gathered ...
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11 votes
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Manilius nesciebat quid scribebat

This is an example of an indirect question, e.g. I asked where he was. I know what he did. I told you what I would do. Or, as in this case: "He didn't know what he was writing." This construction ...
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11 votes
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Semantic difference of ablative and accusative cases when following "in"

Do not only look for “movement” when you see in used with the accusative. In is very versatile and has a lot of meanings that cannot be easily summed up in a few words. A good dictionary will describe ...
11 votes
Accepted

Plural of axis mundi

Yes, the nominative plural of axis is axes. Mundi 'of the world' is the genitive singular of mundus 'world', and you probably wouldn't pluralize it in most contexts (presumably there's still only one ...
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10 votes

Is "esse est percipi" grammatical, even with infinitives?

Cogito ergo sum does not mean "seeing is believing". It in fact means "I think therefore I am." Decartes used it as a statement of epistemology: If he can think, if he can conjure up rational process, ...
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10 votes
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"Dies unus"—non primus?

This is a literal translation of the Hebrew original, which has yom ehad "one day", not yom rishon "first day".
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