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8 votes

Latin translation of "no slavery beyond death"

Here's a suggestion that borrows from Anserin's helpful answer: mortui nullus est dominus. This literally means: A dead man has no master. If you're more interested in the general sense rather ...
brianpck's user avatar
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7 votes
Accepted

How would you say "He says he used to remember that." in Latin?

Two quick points about your first translation: It's generally not a good idea to translate an English personal pronoun in the subject position with is/ea/id. There are exceptions (e.g. when you are ...
brianpck's user avatar
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6 votes

Latin translation of "no slavery beyond death"

I think that in classical Latin, we wouldn't say that there is no more slavery, but rather that there are no more slaves. In general, abstract nouns are avoided. post mortem nemo servus (erit) (no ...
Anserin's user avatar
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4 votes

Very new learner looking for feed back

First, welcome to this forum, and congratulations on your decision to learn the beautiful Latin language. Rem pulcherrimam aggressus es, quae tibi magnam adferat gaudiam. (You have embarked on a most ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
3 votes

Very new learner looking for feed back

This response is to provide feedback on the translation as asked, as opposed to providing a translation. The 'we active present tense' form for the verbs:- latro, latrare, is latramus, for the verb:-...
fantome's user avatar
  • 199
3 votes

«Dream and believe» in Latin

"Somnium et Crede" means "A dream and believe!", the only context I can think of where it would make sense is as an answer to a question like "Name a noun and a word beginning ...
Anserin's user avatar
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3 votes

Latin translation of "no slavery beyond death"

Maybe "Nulla servitudo post mortem."? Nulla - zero, no servitudo - slavery, from "servus" (slave) post - after mortem - accusative singular of "mors" (death), because &...
FlatAssembler's user avatar
3 votes

To be One's Own Worst Enemy

Here is a variation on the theme expressed in Seb's answer, also from Cicero: "de Finibus Bonorum et Malorum" 5. 28: "necesseque est, si quis sibi ipsi inimicus est, eum quae bona sunt ...
tony's user avatar
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3 votes

What is "Book of the Black Sacrament" in Medieval Latin?

If you're looking for a church-flavored phrase, I'd go with Liber de Sacramento Obscuro. Obscurus can mean "dark (as in black)," but also "hidden," "secret," "...
cmw's user avatar
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1 vote

Translating a motto (you can't always please everyone, but you can always save money)

You have already suggested several patterns. But for feedback: placere does not work with the accusative, but with the dative. hence we should use omnibus placere. parcere does not usually work with ...
d_e's user avatar
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1 vote

How to distinguish between "X is Y" and "Y is X"?

Both sunt and est at the beginning of a sentence can means 'there are' and 'there is’ and also 'there exists'. Esse can have those meanings and others. From M. Tullius Cicero, De Divinatione http://...
fantome's user avatar
  • 199

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