26

Joonas' answer is right on grammar, but since we're not talking about a single star, an adjective based on sidus would have better semantics. I'd go with Bella Siderea. Familiarity with modern Romance languages is not an unmixed blessing when translating into Latin. Often Latin has multiple words in the same semantic field with different shades of ...


22

Neither is correct, and timetere isn't a real Latin word. A correct translation depends somewhat on whether the command is directed at one person (e.g., you, the bearer of the tattoo) or the world at large (e.g., those who see the tattoo). For the former case (audience = one person), you could say Noli messorem timere or Ne messorem timueris. Ne messorem ...


20

Caesar (B. Gall., iii, 27) simply uses subest “be close at hand, be near”: ...quod hiems suberat... Thus, hiems subest.


17

Schopenhauer himself rendered his concept "Wille zum Leben" as "voluntas vivendi" in a marginal note to Augustine's Civitas dei.


16

Your suggestions are not quite right, and they might in fact be badly misunderstood. There are two things to consider here. The first one is simple. Omnia is plural and the verb must agree. Omnia (ex)urunt is grammatically valid. The second and more complicated thing is ergativity. Some English verbs behave ergatively, meaning that the one experiencing the ...


16

Indeed, you cannot use a plain noun as an attribute in Latin the way you can in English. Instead of "Star Wars" you have to say "Wars of Stars" or "Stellar Wars". Adjectives are a very natural choice in Latin (whereas I would be tempted to choose genitives in Romance languages). Bellum is indeed good for "war". It is a matter of taste whether you choose ...


15

I'm surprised appropinquo (sometimes spelled adpropinquo) hasn't been mentioned yet. Caesar (Bellum Civile 3.9) also uses this one, and to my ears, it better fits what is being said in the show. jamque hiems adpropinquabat At that point winter was approaching... I can envision Romans, worried about the coming winter, saying "Hiems appropinquat." ...


15

I'd go for a wordplay: Pater optime cerevisiam sapit Just as the other answers, pater is straightforwardly father The verb sapio means both to taste and to know/understand. Hence sapit is the right conjugation to speak about a third person (a "he", the father) who knows. In Latin you have different words for knowing. Not sure how to describe them in ...


15

When (Sir) Terry Pratchett was knighted, he chose this phrase as his heraldic motto. The official translation in that context is Noli Timere Messorem. This isn't the most natural word order (which would be noli messorem timere), but the meaning is the same: a command to a single person, "do not fear the reaper".


15

The Latin verb futuere is a good translation for the English verb "fuck" in the sense of sexual intercourse. The past participle fututus means "fucked" in this sense. As often in Latin, this can be intensified with a prefix. The adjective defututus can well be translated as "totally fucked", although many dictionaries give much softer translations like "...


14

You are indeed right not to trust Google Translate with Latin. I recommend translating "will" with voluntas. I don't know a better word for this purpose. Please check the linked dictionary entry to see what nuances it has. When translating constructions like this to Latin, I suggest using the genitive of the gerund. If you want to describe the ease of ...


14

If, as I believe, the sentence stands as the theme of the website you should use the infinitive ludere instead of the participle ludens. The latter means "who plays/is playing". As for "with prime numbers", it is an adverb of means and in Latin (for inanimate objects) this is expressed by the simple ablative, which gives numeris primis. All in all: ...


13

The verb cadere ('to fall'), when paired with an adverb (or when its subject is paired with an adjective), can mean 'to turn out (in the manner denoted by the adverb/adjective)' – for example: quis negat, aut quis iam audebit, quod male cecidit, bene consultum putare?, 'Who denies it, or who now will dare to consider what has turned out badly to be a good ...


13

To offer a variant to the great suggestions by Nickimite: Amore crescit. [It] grows with love. There is an implicit noun or pronoun of some kind, but you don't have to spell it out and it can vary. It could be life, faith, love itself, a child, or anything else that could be referred to as it, he, or she. Adding an explicit subject vita (life) as ...


13

As Joonas said, I would use a form of the participle fututus, literally "fucked". Here's one example, from Catullus VI: Cur? Nōn tam later' ecfutūta pandās, nī tu quid faciās ineptiārum Why? Because you wouldn't display your fucked-out body like this unless you were doing something obscene. (In this poem, Catullus is saying it's obvious that ...


12

The Wiki translation is bad in several ways (the first line is missing the word "change"; the infinitives are not good Latin; the verbs in the relative clauses should be subjunctive; and the word choices are mostly unidiomatic translationese). Here's an attempt: O deus / domine, dona mihi animi aequitatem, ut quae mutare non possim, clementer feram; ac ...


12

In Latin there is no equivalent for please, you use some form of I ask, instead. Aparently, having a specific word for please dates back just to the Renaissance, and in many languages it comes from more elaborate formulas like if it pleases you, if you are so kind. I'd offer two possible variants: Ora, quaeso, pro me (or with a different word order: ora ...


12

Memento precisely conveys that meaning, in my opinion. It is an imperative (like "do this", "do that"), which means "Remember!", as in "Do remember". This word is part of a very famous expression: memento mori. There are a few question on the meaning of such expression in this site. E.g. here.


12

The best phrase would be Deus optimus maximus, literally “God [is] best and greatest”. Not only is the meaning right but it has an ancient lineage which makes it perfect for this use. Iuppiter optimus maximus is a standard pagan formula for Jupiter. Christianity took this phrase over and the dedication Deo optimo maximo, “To God, best and greatest”, ...


12

Domitor (without the -um, which is unnecessary here) would be a breaker in the sense of a breaker of wild horses. It doesn't have to do with physical breaking, which is what you want. Instead, you can use a derivative of a verb such as frangere – e.g., fractor. Though this word is unattested (at least in classical Latin), it's easy enough to derive it. You ...


11

In Latin, "fish" is piscor, -ari, -atus sum, a first conjugation deponent verb. The form you use, piscantur, is third person plural. It means "they fish." The original phrase is a later Latin translation of Plutarch's Greek translation of what Pompey said, presumably in Latin: "πλεῖν ἀνάγκη, ζῆν οὐκ ἀνάγκη." Navigare is active infinitive: "to sail." The ...


11

My suggestion is: Rami universi ex una radice. Literally, this means "all the branches from the same root". There is no need for an explicit verb, especially for a motto. There are a couple of choices here I wish to point out explicitly: The wording is compact so as to fit a motto. I used chiastic word order to highlight the branches and the root at the ...


10

I give some real examples taken from medieval latin: ex his praemissis haec sequitur conclusio (Saint Lawrence of Brindisi) sequitur ex praemissis ista conclusio (Ockham) haec / ista conclusio sequitur ex praemissis (Ockham) ex praedictis praemissis sequitur ista conclusio (Ockham) conclusio sequitur ex talibus praemissis (Ockham) ...


10

A touch more positively than Joonas's answer, I suggest studium vitae, 'zeal' or 'eagerness for life'.


10

I think quid si will work. Plautus uses this a lot. It reminds me of the French construction si on + imparfait? for making suggestions to do something: si on allait à l’exposition? / how about we go to the exhibition? Of course, it's also exactly like the English "what if ...?" which can sometimes be used in the sense of "how about ...?" So, using your ...


10

If you want a single word meaning "high school" specifically, I think the closest would be lycēum. I think the word schŏla "school" would also be appropriate in reference to a high school. As you note, the concept of a "high school" seems to be modern, so there is probably no exact classical equivalent. Joonas mentioned the word lycēum in chat, and I think ...


10

I apologize if this comes across as a non-answer, but I cannot help giving it. I have translated several songs into Latin for professional singers. Good translations take a lot of work: I make sure the singer is comfortable with the translation. I add or remove syllables or avoid words they find awkward for some reason. I make the rhyme, alliteration, and ...


9

I see two approaches here: the literal and the historical one. From a semantic point of view, your choice of words is mainly right, but as Joonas points, orbis means primarily something round, and its assocaition (and meaning change into European languages) with the whole World derives from the fact that its use with terrarum and terrae (the roundness of ...


9

The verse John 3:16 makes use of two grammatical topics which are important in both Greek and Latin: a result clause and a purpose clause. According to this, the verse can be logically divided in two. I will first treat your handling of the result clause ('For God so loved the world, that he gave his only son') and then, if I find time, I will edit this ...


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