25

Google Translate is unreliable with Latin and you should not take anything it gives seriously. The suggestion non insectum opus est sounds like "an insect is not work". I am not aware of good Latin words for "bug" or "feature". Therefore I would take a different approach and suggest: Non forte sed ratione. Not by chance but by ...


16

Non cognatione, sed amore germanae. This means literally "Sisters not by blood, but by affection". Note that I've used the word germanae (cf. Spanish hermanas) instead of sorores (cognate of "sisters"). The difference is that germana (germanus for a man) specifically means "daughter (son) of the same parents", whereas soror (...


13

A direct translation of “Not sisters by blood but sisters by heart” would be: Sorores non quidem sanguine, sed corde. That is actually somewhat conversational. For a tattoo you might prefer a pithier version: Non sanguine, sed corde sorores. In the meantime, Vincenzo has written an answer that uses the same structure, but different words. My variant uses a ...


8

It is an indirect question. The question words are quantae and quam. The direct version would be: How great are the forces of the enemy, and how impregnable is their position? Quantae sunt hostium copiae et quam inexpugnabilem locum tenent? Indirect questions always get the subjunctive (conjunctive), no matter how certain the matter is. The Latin for &...


7

It's somewhat more general than the question, but there's a famous Latin saying: Quidquid agis, prudenter agas et respice finem. In everything you do, act wisely and consider the end. It is from the Gesta Romanorum, a late medieval collection of fables, chapter 103. It's actually one of three “wisdoms” sold by a merchant to a just ruler for mille florenis, ...


5

From the Temple of Apollo, at Delphi, the pithy aphorism: "nosce te ipsum" = "learn to know yourself". (The simplistic use of imperative, "nosce" (from "nosco" = "learn to know"), with accusative direct object, "te", intensified with a part of "ipse" = "self", the accusative &...


4

One way to speak generally, without naming a specific subject, is to use an impersonal verb like oportet: Oportet capitula perlegere si examen transibis. (Literally: It is proper/necessary to read the chapters thoroughly if you will pass the exam.) Another way is to use tu as the subject, as we often say "you" in English to denote anyone, not ...


4

I suggest using the verb debere. It can be used for various kinds of owing, including "owing to do something". It expresses a must of expectation, not an order — although an order can of course be veiled as a polite remark. For example: You should know it by now. Iam scire debes.


3

This answer might not adhere exactly or fully to the question's demands, yet I believe it contains some valuable information. Here several sources to collect idiomatic expressions or collocation are presented. (*) The expressions in italics in this answer were confirmed (and several were discovered [previously unknown to me]), using the tool in point 2. 1. ...


3

How about: "Volo pacem, officio paro bellum." I want peace, out of duty I prepare for war. The verbage here is taken from the saying "vis pacem, para bellum." If you want peace, prepare for war." Your phrase literally means "I make towards peace, dutiful I prepare for war." Officiosus feels clunky too me, and its a bit too ...


3

"Conari est incipere errare" is an easy rendering of this quote directly from English to Lain. "To try is to begin to err." You could also do "Conari est initium erroris" meaning "To try is the beginning of an error."


3

In "academy research fellow" the main word is "fellow" and the two others modify it. In Latin those modifiers become adjectives, "academy-related" and "research-related". This could be academicus and investigatorius or inquisitorius if "researcher" is investigator or inquisitor as my Finnish–Latin–Finnish ...


3

Non error, sed adiunctum Not a mistake, but an essential feature (or attribute). Edit: I attempted to answer what I saw was a question, but now see as more of a post.


2

Not directly related to youth, but there's a phrase I was told was a common Latin saying when I studied Latin: "Properate lente", i.e. "make haste slowly".


2

I would say: "Bene capita inspectanda (sunt) ut succedere possit." Word-by-word this is: "[Well] [the chapters] [must be studied + (be.PRESENT)] [so that] [to succeed] [one is able]." When a word lacks a subject, it becomes passive. The form the passive takes depends on the tense and mood of the verb. Since you expressed a phrase ...


2

O Felix culpa, o necessarium Adae peccatum! (O happy fault, O necessary sin of Adam!) This is a paraphrase of a line from the Exsultet which captures (in extremely florid and poetical language) some of what you are aiming at. I hope it helps, or at least inspires!


2

First of all, Google Translate is horrible with Latin and is not to be trusted. It has relevant components to it, but the details go awry. If you want a reliable online Latin dictionary, check this list of ours. The word terra is more like "land", "country", or something of that kind. For the whole planet the more suitable word is tellus1....


1

Per volentiam (conscious intent, will), or Per vim (force of will, determination, even violent force). If you want the "of man" you can use hominis or viri the former being more mankind, the latter being an individual. You'd add this after volentiam or vim ad astra remains the same. Ergo: Per volentiam, ad astra etc.


1

A very straightforward rendering would be: Sententiae (or aphorismi) sapientes de vivendo I'm reminded of the collection of pithy Latin quotes by Andreas Fritsch, one of the most prominent recent proponents of living Latin, which is titled: Index sententiarum ac locutionum. It does not quite fit your request, though: He makes no promise that the quotes are ...


1

If you want to specifically say "You should know how to do it by now" rather than "you should already know", you may want Id agere iam scire debes (or, if the "doing it" is a physically constructive act like building a chair as opposed to, say, filing a motion, Id facere iam scire debes).


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