8

Pope Francis uses nativitas for Christmas is his Latin tweets, so I would suggest something simple like: Felicem Nativitatem Habe / Habete If you don't want to include the imperative, you could drop habe so you're simply making a statement. You could also something more like the Romans did with Saturnalia: io Felix Nativitas!


8

What you typically see on inscriptions is the person who made it, me, and fecit. People took ownership of their craft back then, as opposed to mass produced things today. But since presumably you don't who the person who crafted your object, we can use the passive, which would be factus, -a, -um est. For example, "this thing was made" equates to ...


7

The phrase "one day" indicates an indefinite future time. The most common way to express that idea in classical Latin was with aliquando, though olim is also found, and quandoque has a more wishy-washy feel (at some point or other, eventually). By contrast, uno die would mean "in a single day," as when in Plautus' Miles Gloriosus, the ...


6

All three work. I would also recommend paene. Compare Cicero's "paene amicus" in one of his letters: eo die acerbum habuimus Curionem, Bibulum multo iustiorem, paene etiam amicum. On that day we thought that Curio was bitter, but Biblulus was more just by far, even almost friendly. Humanus fits best for "human", yielding the phrase: ...


6

Fear not, when it comes to courtesies, Erasmus usually has you covered. So also in this case. A true renaissance man would, of course, with his pocket edition of the Colloquia ready, not simply have wished someone a "faustum annum novum," but have said: Precor, ut hic annus tibi laetis auspiciis ineat, laetioribus procedat, laetissimis exeat, ac ...


6

The most obvious approach is the conjunction quod + indicative, which is frequently employed after gratias agere, so you'd get: Gratias tibi ago, quod verum mihi dixisti. Examples for this are all over the place, e.g. in Cicero: tibi ago gratias, quod me omni molestia liberasti (ad fam. 13,62) and countless other examples. Another option would be to use a ...


6

This may be a little more broad than what you want, but the first word that comes to mind to me is sententia. From the Lewis and Short dictionary entry for sententia(bolding is mine): a way of thinking, opinion, judgment, sentiment, thought, notion, purpose, determination, decision, will, desire Cicero uses it to mean thoughts in Cic. de Orat. 2.56: qui ...


5

For “producing the opposite end,” I would prefer contrarium eventum efficere or simply contrarium efficere. And for “intend,” who not intendere? I am not sure what you mean by uni qui, although I think it doesn't quite work; but contrarium can be used with atque/ac to say “opposite of/to.” So we get: Doctrina contrarium effecit ac intendebat. Or perhaps: ⋯ ...


5

Well, since you describe a state of exhaustion, you can of course use exhaurire: Omnes vires meae exhaustae sunt. Perhaps a dative of disadvantage might also sound good, i.e. omnes vires mihi exhaustae sunt; depending on context, an abl. abs. would also be possible (e.g. omnibus viribus exhaustis languidus noctem exegi etc). Another possibility would be ...


5

As cmw has indicated, there are different kinds of ideas e.g. an opinion = "opinio"; "sententia" (see Adam's answwer); a suspicion = "suspicio"; a guess = "coniectura" and then an ordinary idea = "species", "forma", "imago", "notitia". If you look these up you will find ...


4

I would personally go with something like etsi metuas, prodi ("Even if you're afraid, proceed"), or if you want it to sound more like a motto, metuens sed tamen prodiens ("Afraid but still going forward") — which even has nice rhythm if you disregard the exact vowel lengths.


4

Lūsus needs to be lūsum to agree with amōrem. I think the sense of "for" in the sentence is normally rendered by the dative in Latin. Scelus prō aliquō is a crime committed on behalf of someone, not a crime in the eyes of someone. Other than that, your translation is correct. I'm also only a beginner, though, so you should await another answer or a ...


4

SVO and SOV refer to subject-verb-object and subject-object-verb respectively, and neither of your clauses in your sentence has an object, so it's not relevant. Instead, you have nominatives with a copulative. The general rule of thumb for these (aside from "context is king") is that the first word is the more important and emphasized one. I'll ...


4

I'll cite an actual Classical example: itaque quoniam aliter dis immortalibus est visum, cum mortem ne recusare quidem debeam, cruciatus contumeliasque, quas parat hostis, dum liber, dum mei potens sum, effugere morte, praeterquam honesta, etiam leni possum. And so, since the gods have decided otherwise, and as I must not even shrink back from the prospect ...


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