15 votes

Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

I would like to offer a review of both replies posted so far, and offer a couple of my own suggestions which I think are an improvement on both. Laravel's Ave Domine Noctis is in general fine and ...
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13 votes

Lex "customer is always right" - how to say it in Latin (e.g. "in elit semper ius")?

There's a maxim in Black's Law Dictionary: rex non potest peccare (the king can do no wrong). This is easily adapted by substituting emptor (buyer) for rex (king): Emptor non potest peccare.
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11 votes
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Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

The suggestion ave dominus nox misses the mark in two ways: You should be using the vocative case with ave, and here Nox seems to be a name of a lord rather than the word "night". I would ...
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9 votes

Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

The words are correct: "dominus" is indeed the Latin word for "Lord" (see for example the New Testament), "nox" is "night", etc. However, they are not declined ...
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  • 250
8 votes
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How do you say "The Etruscan language died as many years ago as there are stars in the sky and nobody understands it." in Latin?

Ok, this begs for a reprise on Ovid, so I've written one: Quot caelō stēllae || totidem annōs Auguriālis Augure lingua suō || vōce suā caruit Haec elementōrum || dīvīnā lēge beāvit Īnfantemque ...
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7 votes
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Translate to Latin: Merciful Jesus, have pity on me

Pie Iesu, miserere mei will do. The idea in full can be found in some versions of the Ave Verum. Note that the linked article translates pie as holy, though it usually also means benevolent, kind (...
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6 votes

Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

Laravel's answer I think is best for your precise question, but I note that there's a bit of ambiguity with the people here. You have on the one hand the Night Lords and on the other hand the Lord of ...
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6 votes

Lex "customer is always right" - how to say it in Latin (e.g. "in elit semper ius")?

You could use "emptor" for "customer". emptor (emt-), ōris, m. [emo], a buyer, purchaser (Lewis & Short) For the "is always right" part, I would suggest the idiom &...
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  • 250
6 votes

Kyrie Eleison is Greek, but what is the proper Latin Translation?

It's not very common to see this sentence in full, translated in liturgy. The closest, most common, full translation I can think of would be: Miserere nostri, Domine E.g. in the Te Deum. It is much ...
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5 votes
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blizzard (snowstorm driven by strong, sustained winds)

Sī quidem vim ventī cum pluviā procellam vocāmus, licet istud procellam niveam seu nivālem dīcāmus. Atque hoc cōnferātur cum illō 'snowstorm' Anglicō quod idem fere quod 'blizzard' significat, aut cum ...
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5 votes
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Trying to translate: “Blessed be God who calls us His children.”

Either : benedictus Deus qui nominat nos filios suos benedictus Deus qui vocat nos filios suos Nominare means to call as in to name or give a name to, as well as to nominate, appoint. Vocare means ...
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4 votes

What are the Roles of "quo" and "eo" In "the more...the more" Constructions: For Example: "The more you have the meaner you become!"?

This is a correlative construction based on the ablative of degree of difference (A&G 414). quo - by what amount/degree eo - by that amount/degree
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  • 4,771
4 votes

Lex "customer is always right" - how to say it in Latin (e.g. "in elit semper ius")?

The English "The customer is always right" is a sardonic concession: we do not, of course, really think that the customer is always right, but we have to pretend they are, because the rules ...
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3 votes

How to say "oath-breaker" in Latin?

An oath-breaker is periurus, but note that this word can also refer to a perjurer (one who lies under oath), or a liar, an untruthful person in general. Although Cicero thought that lying under oath ...
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3 votes
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What are the Roles of "quo" and "eo" In "the more...the more" Constructions: For Example: "The more you have the meaner you become!"?

Quo is (based on) a relative pronoun, but it is used cataphorically: quo refers forward to eo. A similar construction you will be familiar with: Eam, ex qua natus es, caedes. "Her, of whom you ...
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3 votes
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How do I say "Brief Mass of the Butterfly" in Latin?

I looked up historical missae, and the custom seems to be to either name the piece short (missa brevis), or give the name in full without the length (missa <hoc nomen>). Though Haydn provides an ...
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3 votes

Trying to translate: “Blessed be God who calls us His children.”

Complementing Penelope's excellent answer, another well known passage in the New Testament bringing up the topic is the beginning of the Gospel of John, namely John 1:11-13. In propria venit, et sui ...
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2 votes
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I'm looking for a stable English to Latin translation for the below quote

You need a few things left to make it grammatical. First, the "for" in the beginning is missing. You have two options for that. One is nam at the beginning (nam magnum opus) and the other is ...
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  • 39.4k
1 vote

How to say "engineering the future" in Latin to use as a motto?

"We build the future" would be futurum condimus, or possibly even better futurum facimus. The latter also gets you alliteration, if you're looking for a motto.
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1 vote
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doodle (verb & noun) scribble absent-mindedly/ a rough drawing made absent-mindedly

I would say something like: ōtiōsum (either subject or object) or ōtiōsē nescioquid dēlīneāre > dēlīneāmenta ōtiōsa; also vānum, leve nescioquid; scrībere would probably refer to words; in ...
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