10

I believe acquiescere, excedere, and decedere were used euphemistically. excedere and decedere could be used with "de vita". Lewis and Short also lists "vixit"(he lived) as a euphemism for having died, as well as euphemisms like "si quid factum sit aliquo", "if anything happens to anyone" aka "if anyone dies"....


9

There is nothing wrong with incipere iterum, you could also say: denuo incipere rursus incipere There are also a number of single verbs encapsulating that meaning: repetere, generally “repeat” etc. renovare, literally “renew, restore,” also “repeat your previous words.” Like you can “renew” your efforts in English, it can also be used that way in Latin; e....


8

Can't really go wrong with a straightforward translation. The verb "to see" is videre, and encompasses this metaphorical use of finding out what the future will hold. So the simple future indicative 1st person plural active: Videbimus Cf. Seneca ad Luc. 75.5.1: Videbimus qualis sit, quantus sit. We shall see what sort of person he is, how great he ...


8

No, that is not correct. “A little more” is paulo plus. (Technically that is a neuter ablative: “by a little.”) You could also say paulum plus (technically an adverb) or paululo or paululum; all these are fine. Another option would be aliquantulo (the deminutive of aliquanto, which means “quite a bit”). Note: all these work with any comparative you throw at ...


8

A method that often deliver nicely is searching the fully digitalized L&S dictionary, but from the English. Searching "to die" for example does indeed bring up some nice results, the majority of which I won't include here for they are either already mentioned in other answers or not euphemisms in my opinion; Nevertheless, I do encourage the ...


8

The verb ex(s)pirare, with or without the direct object animam, means 'to breathe one's last breath.' It's found, for example, in Seneca the Younger, Apocolocyntosis 4: expiravit autem dum comoedos audit, ut scias me non sine causa illos timere. Moreover, he breathed his last breath while listening to comic actors, so you know that it's not without reason ...


7

The use of homo as a genuine indefinite pronoun is definitely not good Classical Latin, but homo did have indefinite meaning from the very beginning, and by the Christian era Vulgar Latin was clearly well on its way to developing it into a true pronoun (cf. the Vulgate's non in solo pane vivit homo, often translated as "one does not live on bread alone&...


7

Two verbs based on ire are quite commonly used for dying: Obire is literally "to go towards". Perire is literally "to go through". It seems that perire is used almost exclusively in the deadly meaning, but I still think it originated as a euphemism. The literal meanings of obire are still around at the classical time. When used for ...


6

I would go with something like: Nōn sōlus sum quī conscĭus sim. I am not the only one who is conscious. Cf. the line in the Satyricon: ait Trimalchio: 'solus sum qui vera Corinthea habeam.' Trimalcho said, "I am the only one who holds the Corinthean truth." Or the Justinian Code: solus est, ui per eum seruum possit adquirere. ...he alone who ...


6

It is as grammatical as the English sentence "By ruling". They are both fine, but clearly elliptic; the omitted words are clear enough, so that in the context of such an exchange the response can easily be expanded to: Regendo [[eam (= disciplinam)] sustentabo]. [I will do it (= maintain discipline)] by ruling. When you are asked for a detail, ...


5

Your attempt is not far off. Adjective and noun have to "agree," which in this case means, since universum has neutral gender, that we have to use the neutral version of the adjective too: Monstrosum universum The form monstrosum is post-classical, or so claim Messrs. Lewis & Short, whom you have already met. If you prefer classical Latin, ...


5

I was not aware that you could use de with metuere, but I looked it up and you can. However, it means "about" in that case, and you might want to use just an accusative te. You don't need to use ego in this sentence, unless you want to say something like "I'm not afraid of you" Also, you might want to consider using timere or metuere ...


4

I'd express this as bibendum est cum temperantia and nives albicerae edendae non sunt without any need for an impersonal pronoun.


4

“Only for us” is nobis solum. The opposite, non nobis solum (“not only for us/ourselves”) is a popular motto. As you can read on Wikipedia, it is supposed to go back to Cicero's De officiis, 1,22, where he says: Sed quoniam, ut praeclare scriptum est a Platone, non nobis solum nati sumus ortusque nostri partem patria vindicat, partem amici ⋯ But since, as ...


4

No, it's dative, not ablative. In the plural, ablative and dative are identical, so you'll have to only guess from context which is which. The only thing that could be added is that often the indirect objects go before the verbs in sentences like these. You can find gratias tibi ago and tibi gratias ago but not gratias ago tibi or gratias ago tibi.


4

Life Life is generally vīta, yes; and as Jack Gallagher wrote, you need for it to be in the accusative: vītam. A poetic alternative might be anima, which though it usually is meaning ‘soul’, also can be understood as ‘life force’ and ‘life’ poetically. Choose There are some other options for ‘choose’: optō, optāre, optāvī, optātum ēligo, ēligere, ēlēgī, ...


4

Here is my theory: This is the effect of pretty ordinary sequence-of-tenses rules. In the Ad familiares example that is easy to see, in the In Verrem example it is mightily obscured by several complications, but the same principles apply. Let's take the easier example first: eum, si aliter fecisset, iniuram Caesari facturum dixit. The protasis must be ...


4

I would suggest: Hic opus inii. "Here I started work." It is common in classical Latin to use inire for starting a job of some kind (e.g. imperium, magistratum inire). Opus is used for many kinds of work, including works of art. I don't think an explicit "my" is needed here, as the person is clear from the verb. I like a succinct ...


4

I would write "opus meum hic incepit" opus = work, action of working meum = my hic = here incepit = started


4

My suggestion is this, since all three of the qualities that the prayer refers to can by expressed through adjectives that modify animus in Latin: animo sim satis aequo ut ea patiar quae mutare nequeam, satis forti ut ea mutem quae mutare queam, satis sapienti ut haec ab illis discernam. May I be of a mind that is sufficiently level that I accept those ...


4

A few notes: Exsecare seems a good fit. Excidere would also be an option. Ita is not correct (it answers to quomodo), it should be itaque (or quare for example, there are many possibilities). I also think it is uncommon to combine et with deinde – at least classically – so it seems more idiomatic to me to strike the et. You could also simply say tum. In ...


3

There are many ways to translate this. If you go the route of using a subjunctive, you can drop the imperative da entirely. Also you can use gerundives instead of infinitives of purpose. Habeam serenitatem ad accipienda quae mutare non possum, animum ad mutanda quae possum, et sapientiam ad cognoscendum quid distet.


3

Da mihi serenitatem accipere sounds to me like "Grant me to accept serenity", which is not what you want to say. In this case, I'd go with the subjunctive, something like Da mihi serenitatem ut accipiam quae non possum mutare, animum ut mutem quae possum, atque sapientiam ut cognoscam quid distet. EDIT: I originally used utrum intersit instead of ...


3

I can't find any evidence of Latin using homo as an impersonal pronoun. It might be interesting to note that the nominative case of Old French hom becomes on, which is used as an impersonal pronoun in French, while the oblique home became homme, meaning man. As for Latin, the passive voice was used instead of any impersonal pronoun. This meant that for ...


2

I don't know of any idiom. Supposing none exist, you're left with translations such as: non oboediam (I will not comply) or inoboediam (I will disobey).


2

poscaenium ~ poscēnium is the name for the place behind the wall of the stage, and is probably what you're looking for, e.g. in poscēniō. It's derived from the phrase post scaenam ~ scēnam "behind the stage". The Roman theatre only had curtains in front of the stage that were lowered to reveal it, so the service space that for us is behind the ...


2

Latin certainly allows “stand-alone prepositional phrases,” and I'm sure you already know a few of them, for example: ante meridiem, post meridiem (a.m. / p.m.) ad hoc, ad libitum, ad inifinitum, ad nauseam in absentia, in medias res, in memoriam de iure, de facto ex cathedra, ex post facto So I see no problem with ultra aulaeum, for example.


2

I did some searching, and the quote originally in Greek, from M. Antonius Imperator Ad Se Ipsum, 10.16 Μηκέθ̓ ὅλως περὶ τοῦ οἷόν τινα εἶναι τὸν ἀγαθὸν ἄνδρα διαλέγεσθαι, ἀλλὰ εἶναι τοιοῦτον. To match the Greek—particularly τοιοῦτον—you'd use talis, meaning "such", to mean "one". I think this would be the option for most cases like this ...


2

Original attempt: sub lux astri lucens Your choice of vocabulary is good, and the word order is natural. What you are missing is some inflection. There is no freedom of choice when it comes to case, number, and gender here. Rather than giving you the full answer, I will give you a list of specific questions, as I believe this to be most useful for learning. ...


2

Succinctness is one way to go about it, but I instead would opt for formality. IN HOC LOCO OPVS COEPI "In this place/on this site I began my work." The bonus of using coepi is that it recalls annuit coeptis of the Great Seal of the US, which, even if you're not in the US, will still make it broadly recognizable.


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