11

The context of this quote (according to the Loeb edition) is: Quis mihi dabit adquiescere in te? Quis dabit mihi ut venias in cor meum…? Quid mihi es? Note the parallel structure: Augustine is asking quis dabit mihi followed by a clause acting like a noun (with either an infinitive or ut). So quis "who?" is the subject, mihi "(to) me" ...


7

Much of what you ask should be explained, but as far as a straightforward translation, you could say: Animum in fornacem iecerunt. If you really need to specify his (if there is otherwise ambiguity), you could add eius after the animum, but it's not strictly necessary in Latin. A couple notes, though. Automatic translation tools are notoriously bad. Don't ...


7

The quotient is quotus, the remainder is residuum. This textbook titled Elementa arithmeticae singularis et universalis lays it out in very simple terms: Dividere est ex producto duorum factorum et ex uno eorundem alterum invenire. Productum cognitum vocatur dividendus. Factor cognitus vocatur divisor. Factor incognitus vocatur quotus. (Click the link and ...


6

While @FlatAssembler is correct that that's one way someone could say "Am I really alive?" it might not necessarily be the most idiomatic way. If what you're looking for is an expression of surprise—like, "Holy moley, I can't believe I'm alive!"—then what you want is an accusative of exclamation: Mene vivam? if your character is female ...


6

I think it's helpful to enumerate the elements that make up the concept you are trying to express. For me at least, concentration has three elements: Mental focus that is intense sustained for some time on a specific object to the exclusion of other concerns It may be the case that a combination of verb and modifiers are required to express all three ...


6

Actually there is an expression that is quite close (literally-wise) to the English to fall in love: in amorem incidere nemo potest uno aspectu neque praeteriens in amorem incidere (Cic.RhetHer.2.33.4) - No one can fall in love at one/first sight nor in passing. The expression incidere in aliquid implies almost passively occurence that came or fell into ...


5

If you want to modify an adjective that modifies a noun, the word you need is tam instead of talis. For example, virgo tam pulchra would be "such a pretty girl". If you use talis instead, the girl is both "pretty" and "such". The word talis only modifies nouns directly, so it can't be used for your purpose.


4

We can resort to Leviticus 19:18. (Do not seek revenge or bear a grudge against anyone among your people,). Both (which occurs much less often than one would think) the Vulgate and Castellio, use the same formula: nec memor eris injuriae civium tuorum (Vulgate) neve acceptae ab eis [popularibus] iniuriae memor esto (Castellio) This is quite interesting ...


4

"In war and peace" would literally be in bello et in pace. However, there are a number of slightly more fancy idiomatic expressions for this idea (as was discussed in this question a while ago). By far the most common of these is domi militiaeque, which means: "at home and in military service." (I am somewhat partial to the alternative ...


4

In the English "5 times easier than" the number 5 doesn't usually seem to refer to anything concrete or easily measurable. Therefore I'd regard it as an idiom rather than an actual numerical comparison. I see no difference between "flying is ten times harder than driving" and "flying is much harder than driving". (If you do, ...


3

Like fdb, I assume you mean this (from Oxford English Dictionary): Originally Military. A bungled or botched undertaking; (also) a situation, state of affairs, or gathering (esp. a military operation) that is disorganized or chaotic. Not this (ibid.): A sexual orgy. If, so, I'm highly doubtful that the Latin equivalent (at least the classical Latin ...


3

What about something like: Fata aleam iecerunt The Fates have thrown the dice. You could even make it passive, which is a more direct allusion to the original: Alea a Fatis iacta est. The dice are thrown by the Fates. / The game is played by fate. Adding "the fates" makes it known that we aren't playing a game of chance, but our game of chance ...


2

Sentire is an infinitive, corresponding to the English "to" form. So sentire omnia by itself means "to feel everything" (depending on context, one might translate it differently). It is not how you would formulate an advice. Sentias omnia (may you feel everything) is better, but in my opinion sounds more like a wish. You could perhaps ...


2

Following the idea of a one-sided die and keeping close to the wording of alea iacta est will probably be difficult. Contrary to popular opinion, alea does not mean "die," but rather "game of dice" or "game of chance." Roman dice games were usually played with several dice, which were either six-sided tesserae (very similar to ...


2

It doesn't follow your 'one-sided die' idea, but one possibility is alea abiecta est for 'the die is [has been] cast away' (or discarded). It follows the phrasing of the original tightly but subverts the meaning. I think it would be reasonable to use it to describe a situation where choice has been abandoned (absent context there are, as ever, other ways ...


2

As I do not know this term I have looked it up in (where else?) the "urban dictionary" site, which informs me that "cluster fuck" means: "1) a bad situation that involves many different smaller situations to create one massive insanely intense ordeal. 2) when to (sic) many things happen at once, making it extremely hard to ...


2

Sebastian's translation is solid and straightforward, but I'll offer a suggestion from a different angle. Why not try an existing Latin phrase? Horace Odes 3.2.13 captures half of the sentiment sweetly: Dulce et decorum est pro patria mori It is sweet and proper to die for one's country. You could add the verb vivere ("to live"), which although ...


1

I think it is "Sumne ego vere vivus?" if the speaker is male (or non-binary) and "Sumne ego vere viva?" if the speaker is female.


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