22

The plural form would be simply: Venimus, vidimus, vicimus. This is the perfect tense, so all verbs have the same endings and the nice parallel remains.


16

This one was mentioned in the linked question and appears to be still valid: dolor sit amet > "carrots" This translation is marked as verified by community and no other options are given. These three Latin words are from the nonsensical lorem ipsum text often used for placeholders. The words are all valid Latin but don't make a sensible ...


15

Your match of mihi with "to" is correct, but that's the dative case, not the genitive. The genitive is mei. Neither case is appropriate here, though. Audio more or less contains the idea of "to" in itself—it means "hear" or "listen to". Thus Listen to me! becomes (Listen to) (me)! becomes Audi me! Another way of ...


14

The regular noun cantus is of the fourth declension, so the genitive would be cantus. Because cantus can also be nominative or accusative plural, and the other two words are also multisignificant, you'd get many neat possibilities, some farther fetched than others: CANTVS CANIS FERI: Song of the wild dog Wild songs of a dog You sing songs of the wild Strike ...


14

As Expedito Bipes says, via is probably a better word for "path" than semita in this context. I'm going to suggest a different verb: Memento viae tuae. Memento means "to mind" in the sense of "be mindful of something", or "remember" (which is how it's most often translated). So the above phrase could be translated &...


13

I would translate it as: Custodi viam tuam The word semita denotes a narrow path and is probably not what you're looking for. I believe via would be a better fit, because it's often used in a more abstract sense to signify something like the path of life. Cicero for example used via as part of an expression meaning the right path of life: ...non nulli ...


13

The phrase you are looking for is either of these: Ut supra, sic infra. Ut supra, ita infra. They both mean the same thing. I think the first one sounds better. I just searched a bit for these on Google Books and was surprised not to find many hits. I thought I'd first encountered this phrase in descriptions of the medieval worldview, as a well known way ...


13

"Folk music" as a category is a very recent concept, so we're not going to find an attested term in the Classical corpus and will have to come up with our own. We can dismiss pleb musicorum out of hand: pleb isn't a Latin word, and even if it were the phrase would mean "[pleb] of musicians". Paganus means "rural" or "rustic&...


12

No, that is not accurate. First, when a wheel is “breaking” in English, it is not breaking something else (transitively). It is also not being broken by something else (passively). It just breaks on its own; this is called the middle voice, and while it is expressed by the active verb form in English, it has to be the passive form in Latin. Second, the ...


11

"Hominum futurae" is ungrammatical gibberish. "Future man" (i.e. the man that will be) would be homo futurus.


10

Here is one expression in hexameter: Si qua roget gallina leves, est illa levanda. Should any hen ask you to lift, it must be lifted. You never asked for a metric expression, but I was unable to resist. I assumed "you" is not a specific person, so I went with a general conditional. Such a condition is often expressed by the conjunctive in Latin, ...


10

Audiatur et altera pars is translated "let the other party", reminiscent of "let them eat cake". This is also verified by Google Translate contributors. Isn't there some Latin.SE API so Google Translate can tap into the knowledge here? Edit: per user2357112 supports Monica's comment, the phrase means "let the other side be heard as ...


10

Latin has an inchoative suffix -sc- which indicates that a certain state is beginning, and which is quite productive (rubesco, senesco, reconvalesco, ...). And indeed, there is the verb amasco – "to begin to love", so that you could say hanc linguam amasco


9

Per tweet, it seems (and verified) Google Translate renders Latine as English. https://translate.google.com/?sl=la&tl=en&text=Ego%20Latine%20loquor%20&op=translate


8

From my admittedly inexperienced and semi-educated perspective, Gallina tollenda, quae tolli rogat. is excellent. It's clear and snappy. Ending on rogat concisely suggests what the English version suggests: that the hen's wishes are paramount. The English "you pick her up" means "it's just in the nature of things that you must pick her up; ...


8

As Nickimite has pointed out, Greece is Graecia, so the accusative would be Graeciam. But that is not how you say where someone is and remains. How exactly you say that depends on how you describe their dwelling place; however for regions and countries it's simply in + ablative – so that would be in Graecia. For the names of cities and small islands and a ...


8

Oxford [English-to-Latin section (under "fall")], offers "adamo" = "to fall in love with", taking the accusative case. (In the Latin-to-English the definition of "adamo" is "to love passionately". I am always suspicious when the two sections fail to coincide.) Lewis & Short gives "to love truly, ...


7

So I'm just gonna go ahead and post the answer that started it. While translating "sheperd" via Google translate yields "pastor" as expected, translating "goatherd" does not yield the expected "pastor" but rather "unus caprimulgus" which back-translates as one of a kind of bird named for its myth of drinking ...


7

Allow me to offer yet a different route: Homo venturi saeculi. Saeculum is, of course, a “century,” but also “age” and, for example in Tacitus, the Zeitgeist, which perhaps is not altogether irrelevant here, Venturus is in essence a synomym of futurus, but since it's not so insanely all over the place, it has, I think, its appeal. (Evidently my proposal is a ...


6

I'm thinking a future less conditional here with the imperative substituted for the apodosis: Tolle, si qua gallina tolli desideret. Pick her up, should any hen desire to be picked up. I chose desidero as I'm interpreting the hen here as more than merely asking, but also wanting. In that, velle or desiderare are better choices.


6

Proficere means “to make progress, perform, advance.” For example, you can say: Magnum profeci in studiis Latinis. I have made great progress in my Latin studies. (Note that studia is more general than the English “studies” suggests; it can also be translated as “efforts” or “endeavours.”) If you aren't doing so well, you could say: parum proficio (I am ...


6

Oh wow, it's almost like this question was made just for me. I was writing a Latin crossword exercise, where the clues and answers were both in Latin. I wrote the clue "Semper dicebat Carthaginem esse delendam" ("He was always saying Carthage must be destroyed", the answer being "Cato Maior"). I decided to put this clue into GT ...


6

The most common choice is the pair tam…quam. For example: Es tam altus quam Marcus. You are as tall as Marcus.


6

Quibus latent deserta. Latēre = ‘to be hidden’; dēsertum = ‘desert’ (quite common in Vulgate, but also in Vergil, see L&S s.v. dēsero in fine).


6

The negated quid or quis is essentially short for aliquid/aliquis, so the meaning is "not anything shall obstruct" and "not anything shall perish", and "not anything" means of course "nothing".


6

Although the inchoative suffix -sc- is productive, I would advise against using it in everyday speech unless the verb is already a common one. I could say "pugnasco" (unattested) or "puellasco" (a couple usages), but it would call attention to itself in a way that doesn't seem fitting for the phrase "falling in love." Since I ...


5

The Latin word for “devour” is devorare or vorare. Of these, devorare is obviously the root of English “devour.” It is formed from the base vorare and the intensifier prefix de-, which indicates a completeness of action, but as vorare already means “to swallow whole, swallow up,” I honestly do not see much difference in meaning between the two. Devorandum is ...


5

Another howler (to go with the carrots perhaps): Sacrificium laudis → Ham Credit where it is due, this one was discovered and pointed out on Twitter by John Byron Kuhner. As of this writing, it can still be reproduced. What it really means is "sacrifice of praise," and it comes from Psalm 49:14 (Psalm 50 in English bibles). I have no idea how ...


5

Mens semita tua would mean roughly "the mind is your path". That the noun mind and the verb to mind are homophones is an idiosyncrasy of English which doesn't translate into other languages. If you want to stress that you are minding your own path, you can transpose the possessive pronoun to the beginning and say tuam viam sequere ("follow ...


5

As...so... can be represented in a few ways, but I like tam...quam... for it: tam de superiis, quam de inferiis. Just as from above, so too from below. This also gets to the Arabic better, if the Wikipedia article is accurate.


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