18

Lux can mean "light", and ex can mean "out (of)"; but that sign is wrong. The grammar is impossible; you can't just combine words like that in Latin. To give you a feel of the type of wrongness, consider a sign in English that said "Of She". That would sound almost like gibberish. It should be "of her", and even then it could mean many things. Likewise, ...


17

This looks like a standard baptism record. In the Year of Our Lord 1887, on the 17th day of the month of April, in this church of the Most Sacred Heart of Jesus in Machang-Bubok, I, Sorin, M. Ap., solemnly baptized the legitimate son of Lam Fuk On and Virginia, born four days ago; the name "Justinus" was given to him. Mian Ah Vu(?) and his wife, Lam ...


16

This is dog Latin for "out of many come smartasses" (or "a smartass"). It's modelled off the phrase ē pluribus unum, "out of many [comes] one", which is printed on American currency, plus the fake Latin smart-assimus for "smartasses". The -us is typically a singular ending, but is also commonly used to create dog Latin in general. As a side note, while "...


15

It's a record of a baptism, stating: the date of the event (17 of April of 1887), which was four days after the baby was born the minister officiating the ceremony (Father F.P. Sorin, a French missionary priest, buried at St. Anne's Church, just a few miles away from the church where the baptism took place) (more info about the priest here) the place (the ...


14

Well, without too much knowledge of any deeper, ulterior meanings to the phrase, I can certainly provide and analyze the literal translation for you: And you, Brutus? et → a simple conjunction tu → vocative, singular case of the second-person pronoun Brute → vocative, singular case of the proper noun Brutus (2nd declension). Alternative, fairly literal ...


14

The first part of your quotation is not from Cicero, but from the Apologeticus Adversos Gentes pro Christianis (3,2) by Tertullian (c. 155 – c. 240 AD): Laudant quae sciunt, vituperant quae ignorant "They praise what they know, they blame what they are ignorant of" (transl. by T.H. Bindley). It refers to those who blindly blame the christians not even ...


14

That "U" is probably a "D": rem ordine pando. This is a quote from Vergil's Aeneid 3.179 and means "I explained the whole thing [i.e. the whole story] in order."


13

The phrase is confusing if one assumes that missa is a perfect passive participle, since it has no obvious antecedent. The ending dialogue of the (Pauline/Novus Ordo) mass goes, V: Benedicat vos Omnipotens Deus: Pater, Filius et Spiritus Sanctus. R: Amen. V: Ite, missa est. R: Deo gratias. One could guess that it is the benedictio that is ...


13

First I must object to this horrible story. My abduction to your overworld by Hercules was illegal, and I am still angry at Pluto for it! That said, I think your translation "heard stories about" is fine, although "stories" sometimes suggests something a bit more exciting or adventurous than fama does: it may be an account of something or someone, a story, ...


13

This quote is from the Historia Ierusalem Baldrici Dolensis Archiepiscopi, Book 2 (pg. 1092 of Migne, Patrologia Latina, CLXVI). Your quote is only a fragment of the relevant sentence, which is likely why you are not able to make any sense of it. Here is the full sentence: Iter enim aggressi, gradiebantur rependo per montana, nimis aspera et scopulosa, ...


13

ceterus, -a, -um is an adjective meaning "other." In this case, it is used substantively and means "other things" or "all else." par, -is is an adjective meaning "equal." Both words are in the ablative plural, to form an ablative absolute, e.g. "Caesare mortuo" = "Caesar being dead." The ablative absolute is very flexible and thus can be translated in many ...


12

I'd translate that literally as "where a free space of air was given", i.e. where the path of the flying debris was unobstructed (such as by buildings or trees). Where the path of the debris was obstructed, it was not carried so far. Qua is an ablative of manner or path, "where(by)". Liberally translated: "where their trajectory through the air was ...


12

Allecto, one of the Furies, is commonly associated with dark colours and snakes (see Pauly–Wissowa on the Furies). Furies often have snake hair too, and snakes are often blue; they don't look like ordinary women. So Allecto took a snake from her dark-blue snake hair. Caerulus can mean "dark" as an epithet to words like death and rain, but Lewis & Short ...


12

I would translate the boldfaced sentence as It is not clear which part would be rightfully considered the front and which part the rear in the whole genus. For creatures of that appearance, that description makes sense. If you want more details or explanation, do ask. Notice that habere does not only mean 'to have', but also 'to consider as something'. ...


12

"By Hercules!" "Indeed!" - Common in classical and post-classical Latin. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0059%3Aentry%3DHercules


12

Both are conjugated in the present tense, passive voice, and indicative mood, from the same verb: muto. The difference is that mutamur is conjugated in the 1st person (plural) (“we change”), while mutantur is conjugated in the 3rd person (plural) (“times change”). Owen is quoting a well-known Latin adage meaning, “Times change, and we change with them.” ...


11

Suetonius, in his work Vita Divi Iuli, reports the last words of Caesar being Greek καὶ σὺ τέκνον; which is the original source of Shakespeare's line, translated into Latin fairly literally: the conjunction καὶ becomes its equivalent et; the pronoun σὺ becomes its equivalent tu, τέκνον "child" is replaced by M. Iunius Brutus's own cognomen. An alternative ...


11

Horace's poem here is about a pretty young girl, Pyrrha, and I understand the phrase to describe how unfortunate (miseri) the men are who have not been able to touch (tempto/tento) her. I might translate it as follows: "Poor guys, for whom you [Pyrrha] shine, you who are untouched [by them]" -- I've expanded the participle into a relative clause. tempto (...


11

The context is definitely helpful for figuring these out. Hæc igitur illico non ingratanter Christianis patuit. Baldric was just speaking about "they" (crusaders, presumably) came first to Caesarea in Cappadocia (Caesarea Cappadociae), which was laid in ruins, and then continued to Plastencia, which was unsuccessfully besieged by the Turks for three ...


11

This is the big question! Genitives can be either subjective or objective, and sometimes it's impossible to know which one a genitive is. Subjective genitives are the subject of the genitive. If this were a subjective genitive, it would mean more "Christ's love", i.e. the love that Christ has and gives. Objective genitives are the object of the genitive. (...


11

Grammatically, the subject must be the bough, because qui, the relative pronoun that refers to ramum, is nominative. In the clause 'which she was hiding', 'which' is the direct object; so the relative pronoun would have to be accusative (quem). In addition, the verb would have to be transitive, which lateo isn't; it doesn't take a direct object (except in ...


11

The Latin you provide is actually incomplete (though not incomprehensible). The English translation is not accurate at all. The quote in question, which appears in the L&S entry for scribo, meaning I.B., is from Statius's Thebaid. Here is some more context: hasta subit velox equitis femur inter equique ilia, letum utrique volens; sed plaga sedentis ...


11

Because Google Translate is wrong. It does not, (or not only) use the dictionary meaning of words, but learns phrases in context. In many cases this can help create a natural translation but (especially for short phrases out of context) it can lead to nonsense. Nescire ("ne scire") means "to not know". Scio me nescire is literally "I know myself to not ...


11

It is great that you looked up so many proposed translations! The many routes taken reflect the difficulty of translating well and the necessity to choose goals for the translation. Google Translate is unreliable with Latin; for detailed analysis and mockery, see the linked question. The original quote is a line from a poem written in dactylic hexameter. ...


10

These seem to be versions of the popular prayer "Pater Noster". Here is an approximate literal translation: sed libera, mais delivre nous, sire, a malo, de tout mal et de cruel martire "(Latin:) But free [us], (Middle French:) but deliver us, father, (Latin:) from evil, (Middle French:) from all evil and cruel torture." This is a hybrid translation-...


10

The trick here is to broaden your translation not of obtinuere but of regnum. Lewis Elementary gives the following definition: kingly government, royal authority, kingship, royalty dominion, sovereignty, rule, authority, supreme power despotism, tyranny, personal sovereignty, arbitrary rule a kingdom, state governed by a king [figuratively] ...


10

I'd suggest something like Familiam ad sustinendam vivo. Literally translated, this means something like "I live for the sustaining of my family." Latin word order is pretty free, so putting familiam ("family") first emphasizes the importance of that word in the sentence. This construction (familiam ad sustinendam) is an example of the gerundive, which is a ...


10

Yes, depending on the type of wall. Rūpēs, -is is a third-declension feminine noun derived from rumpō "break, split". It means a rock which is split apart or has a smooth face; I've seen it translated as "cliff", "canyon", or just plain "rock" (e.g. rūpēs Tarpeia is "the Tarpeian Rock"). Rectus, -a, -um started as the past participle of regō "to keep ...


10

Presumably (as far as one can presume anything without an image of the object in question) it says “rem ordine pando”, a quotation from Vergil’s Aeneid 3:179.


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible