22

Si Deus velit would be quite satisfactory, 'if God should wish [it]', but is, I think, neither as usual or as forceful as the more familiar ablative absolute form Deo volente, 'with God willing', often abbreviated as 'DV'. On old British coinage, etc., Dei Gratia, by the grace of God' used to appear, later shortened to 'DG', with very similar meaning. [The ...


20

From Bibliander's translation of the Qur'an, surah 18, ayah 69, Dixit Moyses, Deo uolente, me quilibet sustinentem, nec te in quoquam offendentem semper inuenies. This is not a literal translation. The original Arabic, transliterated here into a more familiar alphabet is Qala satajidunee in sha'a Allahu ṣabiran wa la a`ṣee laka amra Bibliander ...


17

For a monotheist, Tom Cotton's answer is best; for a polytheist (like the ancient Romans), it would be in the plural, so something like dis volentibus. Another way to word it, which is very similar to Tom Cotton's answer, is si di vol-. I found it in several places, though it doesn't seem as common as an ablative absolute: Plautus Bacchides 239: Extexam ...


15

Yes, Cappelli is basically right (which is perhaps not surprising, he being an authoritative figure in the field of palaeography). Every third word is probably above average, but in most documents one seldom finds a sentence without any abbreviations. Parchment was not cheap, nor was scribal labour. The same applies to manuscripts in any European language, ...


15

This comes from the Book of Hours, and is the first part of the prayers at terce. Latin: Ad tertiam Deus in adiutorium meum intende. Domine ad adiuvandum me festina. Gloria P[atri, et Filio: et Spiritui sancto.] Sicut erat [in principio, et nunc, et semper: et in saecula saeculorum, Amen. Alleluia.] Hymnus: Memento salutis auctor. ...


15

The phrase is the same, except that the gender of the adjective are changed from neutral to masculine/feminine. This way, the verb "to do" applies to human beings rather than to things (see plures here and pauciores here). In the context of economics, what is being employed is workers. Economic liberalism puts efficiency as one of its top values, so using ...


14

This pronunciation change was underway by the fifth century, but perhaps not finalized until the sixth or seventh. Paul M. Lloyd, in From Latin to Spanish, writes: There is no inscriptional evidence of [the palatalization of /k/ and /g/ before the front vowels] until the fifth century, although it may have begun long before, and it continued to be an ...


14

Perhaps graeculus, often translated as Greekling? It refers to Greeks who held positions of some import in Roman society due to their education and higher learning yet were considered too Greek to actually be considered proper Romans and, therefore, part of Roman society. It was also used to mock those Romans who exhibited a taste for Greek language, ...


13

I can't speak to the particulars of any of those dialects, but it seems that historical evidence would indicate that in your hypothetical meeting, everyone would understand each other quite well: It was common for teachers in medieval universities to move around. Famously, around the time period you ask, Aquinas taught in Paris even though he was from Italy....


13

This quote is from the Historia Ierusalem Baldrici Dolensis Archiepiscopi, Book 2 (pg. 1092 of Migne, Patrologia Latina, CLXVI). Your quote is only a fragment of the relevant sentence, which is likely why you are not able to make any sense of it. Here is the full sentence: Iter enim aggressi, gradiebantur rependo per montana, nimis aspera et scopulosa, ...


13

The text says: Trinum deum et unum pronis men- tibus adoremus virginique matri gratulantibus animis iugiter iubilemus. Venite exultemus domino iubilemus de- o salutari nostro praeoccupemus faciem e- ius in confessione et in psalmis iubilemus ei. Quoniam deus magnus dominus et rex magnus super omnes deos quoniam I failed to find this ...


12

I read through Ron Conte's blog post and find it sloppy and unscholarly. He makes the (correct) point that Fr. Z's proposed translation sounds literal and stinted and, almost in the same words, asks us to use his translation even though it makes no grammatical sense, because he has translated many things. It does not help that his proposed translation is ...


12

Sturtevant, The Pronunciation of Greek and Latin, says of the change in pronunciation of C before front vowels (p. 167): "The epigraphical evidence of this change is not abundant enough to inspire confidence before the sixth century". He doesn't discuss the evidence any further, unfortunately. Note that the change is a little more complicated than just "C ...


12

Lines 4 and following are Psalm 94. As to lines 1–3, I believe what we have is an example of an antiphon, where a bit of chant that is extraneous to a psalm precedes, follows, and sometimes (I believe) is also repeated between the verses of that psalm. Specifically, this should be an example of an invitatory, since it uses Psalm 94. The details from the ...


11

The context is definitely helpful for figuring these out. Hæc igitur illico non ingratanter Christianis patuit. Baldric was just speaking about "they" (crusaders, presumably) came first to Caesarea in Cappadocia (Caesarea Cappadociae), which was laid in ruins, and then continued to Plastencia, which was unsuccessfully besieged by the Turks for three ...


11

This is a different verb: not salveō, salvēre (2nd conjugation), but salvō, salvāre (1st conjugation), a late Latin word meaning 'to save.' salvo , āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. salvus, I. to save (late Lat.; opp. perdere; "syn.: servo, conservo)," Veg. Vet. 3, 23, 3; Lact. de Ira Dei, 5, 7; Hier. Ep. 20, 4; Vulg. Isa. 4, 2; id. Amos, 2, 14; Sedul. 1, 109. (...


10

In classical Latin, the ablative of comparatives could end on -i, although -e is probably more common. Here are a few quotations that I think must be conceded to contain ablatives: Cornelius Nepos, Vitae Ca. 2.2.2: … ibi cum diutius moraretur, P. Scipio Africanus consul iterum, cuius in priori consulatu quaestor fuerat, uoluit eum de prouincia depellere …...


10

The proportion of abbreviated words in a medieval manuscript depends on the time when it was written and also the individual scribe, but could generally be quite high. I believe that the estimate by Cappelli cited in the question is rather conservative. As an example, consider the following excerpt from an 11th century manuscript, containing verses 137 to ...


10

As you say, “ly” is an early form of the Romance article; you can compare the Old French article for nom. sing. masc. "li". Aquinas uses it in his commentary on the Gospel of John 1,1 explicitly as the equivalent of the Greek article in its specifying sense: Ut ergo Evangelista hanc supereminentiam divini verbi significaret, ipsum verbum absque ulla ...


10

These seem to be versions of the popular prayer "Pater Noster". Here is an approximate literal translation: sed libera, mais delivre nous, sire, a malo, de tout mal et de cruel martire "(Latin:) But free [us], (Middle French:) but deliver us, father, (Latin:) from evil, (Middle French:) from all evil and cruel torture." This is a hybrid translation-...


10

Besides machinator, I found two words for engineer in classical Latin that are primarily directed towards the devising of buildings and fortifications. aedificator A builder, derived from aedes (house, temple) munitor An engineer of fortifications, derived from moenia (walls). An architectus, besides being an architect, could also represent someone who ...


10

I found a few other examples from a search on Perseus of Lewis and Short (I looked for words ending in "llula", "llulus" and "llulum"): arcellula < arcella < arca a very little box, Diom. p. 313 P. lamellula < lamella < lamina a small plate of metal: “glebulas emi, lamellulas paravi,” Petr. 57, 6. asellulus < asellus < asinus a ...


10

The motto calls upon connotations and associations in Latin that are hard to evoke in an analogous way in English. So here is a clumsy translation followed by some exposition of generosus and virtus so you can follow for yourself how they combine in the motto: High-born manliness fears nothing. generosus The adjective generosus = genus + -osus. Genus is ...


10

The word futuraram is not well-formed: the closest correct form is futurarum (feminine genitive plural) but actually futurorum (masculine genitive plural) is the only form that seems to make sense in context to me. It is possible that it means futurarum [rerum] ("of future things")--a phrase often used by Cicero, without the ellipsis--but it comes out to the ...


10

I agree with brianpck's comment: I don't understand why you're reading this glyph as a Q. In isolation, it might look like a Q, but considering the context, it appears to be a variant of M (it's not that unusual I think for capital M to have a closed bottom in certain handwriting styles). Have you ever seen this glyph used for Q in this text? The symbol I ...


10

I'm afraid my answer is the boring one: free variation, based on the amount of space available. The tilde originally arose purely as an abbreviation: instead of writing an n or m in line with the text, it could be written above the vowel instead, saving a bit of space. Eventually its form got simplified into the tiny squiggle we use nowadays. But the ...


9

I believe the cursory etymology you stated is inaccurate. Here is what my research shows: Medieval Latin meaning of trivium / trivialis In the Middle Ages, the liberal arts were divided into the trivium (grammar, logic, and rhetoric) and the quadrivium (music, arithmetic, geometry and astronomy), but this was hardly a relationship of easy and difficult. ...


9

Modern people often underestimate how fractured the linguistic landscape of Late Mediaeval and Early Modern Europe were. Outside of Langue d'Oïl, very few people spoke each particular language you find in Europe. Even in England, until around the 17th Century, regional differences in spelling and vocabulary might not guarantee that a man from Manchester ...


9

Cappelli is the most reliable source in the field of Latin palaeography. What he says in the description of the signs of truncation also matches my experience. So there are hardly any different connotations at all, except that some of the signs are used more frequently to indicate that certain specific letters have been omitted. Quoting Cappelli: The ...


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