24 votes

What is a Latin version of Inshallah?

Si Deus velit would be quite satisfactory, 'if God should wish [it]', but is, I think, neither as usual or as forceful as the more familiar ablative absolute form Deo volente, 'with God willing', ...
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19 votes

What is a Latin version of Inshallah?

From Bibliander's translation of the Qur'an, surah 18, ayah 69, Dixit Moyses, Deo uolente, me quilibet sustinentem, nec te in quoquam offendentem semper inuenies. This is not a literal translation....
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18 votes
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When did “c” before “e” or “i” start to be pronounced as [ts] (in contrast to classical [k])?

This pronunciation change was underway by the fifth century, but perhaps not finalized until the sixth or seventh. Paul M. Lloyd, in From Latin to Spanish, writes: There is no inscriptional ...
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18 votes

What is a Latin version of Inshallah?

For a monotheist, Tom Cotton's answer is best; for a polytheist (like the ancient Romans), it would be in the plural, so something like dis volentibus. Another way to word it, which is very similar ...
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17 votes
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What kind of scribal abbreviation for Christi is this?

I think it is the Christ monogram ΧΡ, followed by the genetive ending -i. Those are not the Latin letters X and P, but rather the Greek letters Chi and Rho, which are the first letters in the word ...
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16 votes
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Was there a word which meant roughly the same thing as "nerd" or "geek" does today?

Perhaps graeculus, often translated as Greekling? It refers to Greeks who held positions of some import in Roman society due to their education and higher learning yet were considered too Greek to ...
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  • 8,321
15 votes
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How often were medieval scribal abbreviations used?

Yes, Cappelli is basically right (which is perhaps not surprising, he being an authoritative figure in the field of palaeography). Every third word is probably above average, but in most documents ...
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  • 18.7k
15 votes
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What does this manuscript say?

This comes from the Book of Hours, and is the first part of the prayers at terce. Latin: Ad tertiam Deus in adiutorium meum intende. Domine ad adiuvandum me festina. Gloria P[atri, et Filio: ...
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15 votes
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Pun on Leibniz quote

The phrase is the same, except that the gender of the adjective are changed from neutral to masculine/feminine. This way, the verb "to do" applies to human beings rather than to things (see plures ...
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14 votes

How different were high medieval Latin dialects from different parts of Europe?

I can't speak to the particulars of any of those dialects, but it seems that historical evidence would indicate that in your hypothetical meeting, everyone would understand each other quite well: It ...
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13 votes

When did the word "ly" enter the Latin language and where did it come from?

As you say, “ly” is an early form of the Romance article; you can compare the Old French article for nom. sing. masc. "li". Aquinas uses it in his commentary on the Gospel of John 1,1 explicitly as ...
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  • 15.9k
13 votes

When did “c” before “e” or “i” start to be pronounced as [ts] (in contrast to classical [k])?

Sturtevant, The Pronunciation of Greek and Latin, says of the change in pronunciation of C before front vowels (p. 167): "The epigraphical evidence of this change is not abundant enough to inspire ...
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  • 28.5k
13 votes
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Translation of a passage related to the crusades

This quote is from the Historia Ierusalem Baldrici Dolensis Archiepiscopi, Book 2 (pg. 1092 of Migne, Patrologia Latina, CLXVI). Your quote is only a fragment of the relevant sentence, which is ...
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  • 36.7k
13 votes
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Deciphering Latin text in an illuminated musical manuscript

The text says: Trinum deum et unum pronis men- tibus adoremus virginique matri gratulantibus animis iugiter iubilemus. Venite exultemus domino iubilemus de- o salutari nostro praeoccupemus ...
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12 votes

"Miserando atque eligendo"

I read through Ron Conte's blog post and find it sloppy and unscholarly. He makes the (correct) point that Fr. Z's proposed translation sounds literal and stinted and, almost in the same words, asks ...
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12 votes
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Latin words for “engineer”

Besides machinator, I found two words for engineer in classical Latin that are primarily directed towards the devising of buildings and fortifications. aedificator A builder, derived from aedes (...
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  • 521
12 votes
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What does "Hæc igitur illico non ingratanter Christianis patuit" mean?

The context is definitely helpful for figuring these out. Hæc igitur illico non ingratanter Christianis patuit. Baldric was just speaking about "they" (crusaders, presumably) came first to ...
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12 votes
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Can there be double diminutives in Latin?

Yes, double diminutives are possible in Latin. I found a few other examples from a search on Perseus of Lewis and Short (I looked for words ending in "llula", "llulus" and "llulum"): arcellula < ...
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  • 21.7k
12 votes

Deciphering Latin text in an illuminated musical manuscript

Lines 4 and following are Psalm 94. As to lines 1–3, I believe what we have is an example of an antiphon, where a bit of chant that is extraneous to a psalm precedes, follows, and sometimes (I believe)...
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12 votes
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"videtur quod" = "it seems that" or "it is seen that"?

Context, and a good understanding not only of the nuances of Latin, but also those of your target language (English), will be your guide to the best translation. For example, even in the active voice, ...
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12 votes
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Were there ever gerunds for posse and esse?

Scholastic Latin supplied at least some of the lacking forms. For instance, actus essendi is an important concept in Aquinas’ metaphysics. Giordano Bruno employed the following formula: Modum essendi ...
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  • 5,160
11 votes
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When were trivialis and quadrivialis introduced?

I believe the cursory etymology you stated is inaccurate. Here is what my research shows: Medieval Latin meaning of trivium / trivialis In the Middle Ages, the liberal arts were divided into the ...
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  • 36.7k
11 votes

How often were medieval scribal abbreviations used?

The proportion of abbreviated words in a medieval manuscript depends on the time when it was written and also the individual scribe, but could generally be quite high. I believe that the estimate by ...
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  • 833
11 votes
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Representing medieval latin abbreviation symbols in Unicode

There are two Unicode blocks in particular filled with mediaeval abbreviations, if you (and your readers!) have the appropriate fonts. The Combining Diacritical Marks Supplement (chart) provides ...
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  • 52.5k
11 votes

"Nil virtus generosa timet"

The motto calls upon connotations and associations in Latin that are hard to evoke in an analogous way in English. So here is a clumsy translation followed by some exposition of generosus and virtus ...
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  • 14.8k
11 votes
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Medieval irregularities in the conjugation of salveo?

This is a different verb: not salveō, salvēre (2nd conjugation), but salvō, salvāre (1st conjugation), a late Latin word meaning 'to save.' salvo , āvi, ātum, 1, v. a. salvus, I. to save (late ...
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  • 18k
11 votes
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Why does the Misal rico de Cisneros uses the word "Qiſſa", and what is it supposed to mean? Why not "Miſſa" (Missa)?

I agree with brianpck's comment: I don't understand why you're reading this glyph as a Q. In isolation, it might look like a Q, but considering the context, it appears to be a variant of M (it's not ...
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  • 21.7k
11 votes

"Causa est" in this sentence

The est is the verb of the relative clause started by quae; it's used as a copula, and causa is the predicate nominative (complement). All the genitives – omnium rerum, ipsiusque creature (= creaturae)...
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  • 18k
11 votes

"Audi nos" translation problem

Nos can be either "we" or "us." The nominative and accusative for it are the same. It's not that different from the English "you", which can be the subject (vos auditis, &...
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