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26 votes
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Why did scientists abandon Latin in their publications?

This answer has been percolating in my head for a couple of months now. Given that there haven't been any other attempts to answer it, I've posted it but realise its limitations in providing a clear ...
Penelope's user avatar
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20 votes
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So what *is* the Latin word for “chocolate”?

Latin actually had staying power in the late Renaissance and a few centuries thereafter. We have plenty of treatises from 17th century Europe written in Latin about chocolate, and the word they used ...
cmw's user avatar
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19 votes
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Is *Moscovia* a latinists' invention?

Latin was the general language of civilised Europe until as recently as the 17th century - Newton’s Principia is written in it - so there is nothing unnatural about wanting to refer to Moscow and ...
Martin Kochanski's user avatar
13 votes
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What is "parecbolae"?

This is a word transliterated and adapted from Greek παρεκβολή (parekbolḗ), from πᾰρά (para-, "near", but here meaning "placed together") and ἐκβολή (ekbolḗ, "throwing out" but here meaning "something ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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13 votes
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Indeclinables: What are the strategies good Latinists use to deal with them?

As cmw says, the most common solution was to simply…ignore the problem. In many cases, the ambiguity isn't particularly bad; there's a default of putting the subject before the object, and the context ...
Draconis's user avatar
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12 votes
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Latin words for “engineer”

Besides machinator, I found two words for engineer in classical Latin that are primarily directed towards the devising of buildings and fortifications. aedificator A builder, derived from aedes (...
piscator's user avatar
  • 606
12 votes
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'idem hercle esset' meaning?

"By Hercules!" "Indeed!" - Common in classical and post-classical Latin. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0059%3Aentry%3DHercules
fdb's user avatar
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12 votes
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What does Q.B.V.D. stand for on the title page of a dissertation?

It's also – more commonly, I believe – given as Q. D. B. V. = quod Deus bene vertat, 'May God cause this to turn out well'/'May God grant this success.' This use of verto is under definition 18 in ...
cnread's user avatar
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12 votes

How to say "black market" in Latin?

According to the Vatican's Lexicon Recentis Latinitatis, parvum verborum novatorum Léxicum: mercato nero [Italian]     mercatūra clandestīna [Latin]
Geremia's user avatar
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12 votes

Indeclinables: What are the strategies good Latinists use to deal with them?

You may not like it, but word order is necessary, and in fact is what was done with the Vulgate: Matthew 1.2: Abraham genuit Isaac Isaac autem genuit Iacob Iacob autem genuit Iudam et fratres eius ...
cmw's user avatar
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11 votes
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Interpretation of circumflex in a poem from 1621

*Please see addendum at the bottom I have found two possible explanations for the circumflex: (1) to indicate a long vowel and (2) to indicate an ablative. Both of these functions would seem to ...
Penelope's user avatar
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11 votes
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Use of ß (“eszett”) in Latin text

The modern German roman-type ß was developed at the end of the 19th century as an analogue of the blackletter ß, which was a ligature of ſ and z (which is reflected in its name) that had slowly ...
Wrzlprmft's user avatar
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11 votes
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When were trivialis and quadrivialis introduced?

I believe the cursory etymology you stated is inaccurate. Here is what my research shows: Medieval Latin meaning of trivium / trivialis In the Middle Ages, the liberal arts were divided into the ...
brianpck's user avatar
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11 votes
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How would you say "cafe" in Latin?

There have already been a few answers, but I have always liked the Morgan and Silva Furman University Lexicon, so here are the terms it gives for "cafe": thermopolium, -i, n. taberna ...
Sam K's user avatar
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11 votes
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How do you say "online" and "offline" in Latin?

For “online” you could say: colligatus (from colligare) conexus (from conectere, note: long o, single n!) Thus for “offline” you could say: incolligatus inconexus Or you could go a different route ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
11 votes

Best modern translation for "Emperor"?

Another example I could have used was the Emperor of China or Japan. I'm going to lean more heavily on this one and suggest that none of your above options are ideal. Instead, you should go with ...
cmw's user avatar
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10 votes

Why were some medieval maps made in Latin?

Modern people often underestimate how fractured the linguistic landscape of Late Mediaeval and Early Modern Europe were. Outside of Langue d'Oïl, very few people spoke each particular language you ...
Wtrmute's user avatar
  • 1,226
10 votes
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Rupes Recta, The Straight Wall, Correct Translation

Yes, depending on the type of wall. Rūpēs, -is is a third-declension feminine noun derived from rumpō "break, split". It means a rock which is split apart or has a smooth face; I've seen it ...
Draconis's user avatar
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10 votes
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Variation in the spelling of word-final M

I'm afraid my answer is the boring one: free variation, based on the amount of space available. The tilde originally arose purely as an abbreviation: instead of writing an n or m in line with the ...
Draconis's user avatar
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10 votes
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What is the superlative of ipse?

Joonas is correct: those forms don’t belong in good classical style. Peter Stotz’s Handbuch zur lateinischen Sprache des Mittelalters mentions that Donatus explicitly forbade comparatives and ...
Dario's user avatar
  • 3,246
10 votes

Is it grammatically correct to attributively use nominative forms of nouns in New Latin?

It's valid even in Classical Latin, in fact! Generally, it's fine to put two nouns together in the nominative (or, rather, in the same case) when one of them gives the general category of a thing and ...
Draconis's user avatar
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10 votes
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John Owen's poem: Umquam or numquam?

It seems plausible that Latin version you quoted is corrupt and the original had numquam, in which case "numquam rediturus ad ortum" would refer to the fact that the sun's course in the sky ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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10 votes
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What's the story behind "vernepator cur"?

Cur is Germanic (you can see its etymology on Wiktionary), so that should be your first clue that this isn't real Latin. Also, if you check the Wikipedia, you'll notice that "vernepator" ...
cmw's user avatar
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10 votes
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Difficult sentence from Leibniz's Historia Inventionis Phosphori?

The relatio is further qualified as discedens and hausta. Specifically, it is “in not a few places” (iisque capitalibus, “and the main ones”) a re gesta discedens (deviating from the history), ex ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
9 votes
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"Non possunt dari" translation

English actually has this same construction! Think of it as analogous to the phrase "Granted that" or "It is given that." It's used in philosophy as part of a hypothetical dialogue. In Latin, the "...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes
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What is the Nominative of 'uniuscuiusque'?

Yes, it's unusquisque. Both parts unus and quis are declined, always in the same case. It is a compound pronoun meaning 'each single one'.
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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9 votes
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The many forms of William?

Why do so many forms of this name exist? While modern usage prefers to translate names to an original or etymological form, it was once a more common practice to Latinize names with little change ...
Muskworker's user avatar
9 votes
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Help with Latin translation from a 17th century ecclesiastical Latin book

Your translation is definitely on the right track, but there are a couple of things I want to point out: Omnis modifies generis; that is, omnis generis means "of every kind". There doesn't ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes
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What is the exact translation of 'solummodo'?

You can find it under the solus dictionary entry in Lewis and Short: Strengthened by modo, and joined with it in one word, sōlummŏdo (only late Lat., for the true reading, Plin. 34, 8, 19, § 92, ...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes
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Constructing Latin diminutives

I think abdomunculum would be the most regular diminutive of abdomen. But it seems a bit difficult to me to give a clear answer because the rules about "proper" diminutive suffixes are often based on ...
Asteroides's user avatar
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