49

It's true that in Classical Latin, ille is a demonstrative pronoun (corresponding to that), not an article; indeed, articles as we know them in English do not exist in Classical Latin. However, that's not the entire story. Ille in Classical Latin The meaning of ille in Classical Latin is not so narrow as to exclude its use in these book titles. Allen and ...


43

The actual set of reasons varies from person to person, but here are some: It's a hobby. Why do people still shoot arrows with bows? Surely it's not a very efficient way to attack prey or anything else. Some people like archery, and few of them can or feel a need to point to a specific benefit gained from it. Similarly, some people like Latin. This might ...


26

Joonas' answer is right on grammar, but since we're not talking about a single star, an adjective based on sidus would have better semantics. I'd go with Bella Siderea. Familiarity with modern Romance languages is not an unmixed blessing when translating into Latin. Often Latin has multiple words in the same semantic field with different shades of ...


20

Basically, your second option is correct. There is the Vatican's Lexicon Recentis Latínitátis, referred to in the comment, but its approach to Latin is very idiosyncratic; debates over neologisms often get incredibly acrimonious, if you can believe it, but there are (VERY roughly) two schools: the "Ciceronian," in which making up words for concepts that didn'...


20

For almost twenty years, the de facto standard for Latin technology vocabulary has been the Vocabula computatralia. You can and should use and peruse it for all types of programming-related vocabulary, but I'll reproduce the definitions you are looking for below. For program, we can just take the word from which the English is derived: program 1. subst. ...


20

The source of this Latin ATM message, as confirmed is a few profiles (such as this one from the Catholic Herald and this one from The Telegraph) is the lately-deceased Reginald Foster, who was arguably one of the greatest Latin speakers of the past century. The Vatican Diaries, pg. 196 quotes Foster's own translation: The elevator whirred quietly to the top ...


16

It pains me to suggest that Latin Wikipedia is in error, but Latin Wikipedia is in error. The arma ignifera Nathanial suggests is in fact a word for firearm that some have used, but it's in the silva of the Morgan lexicon, not the adumbratio. The difference between the two is explained in a short piece by the lexicon's current editor, Patrick Owens: The ...


16

Indeed, you cannot use a plain noun as an attribute in Latin the way you can in English. Instead of "Star Wars" you have to say "Wars of Stars" or "Stellar Wars". Adjectives are a very natural choice in Latin (whereas I would be tempted to choose genitives in Romance languages). Bellum is indeed good for "war". It is a matter of taste whether you choose ...


15

Expanding on brianpck's comment above, as a 'dead' language anything you read or write in Latin now will likely be just as readable in another 1000 years. Something written in English, French, German, or any other language, will probably not be as easily read after that much time. Latin incorporates some new words, but the basic language and its utility ...


13

For basic mathematics, I’ve found some answers in the Institutiones Physicæ by Floriani Dalham, published in 1752: 1+2 = 3 would be read unus plus duo sunt tres Additio est duorum, vel plurium Numerorum in unum collectio. Indicatur per signum + adjectum, id est : plus. (…) Dicatur : 4+2+2+7 sunt 15 (Caput III, p. 26) 1-2 = -1 would be read unus ...


13

It is called the interpunct. Empty space to separate words as we do now is not a universal phenomenon. Just as well the Romans might ask why we leave space between words instead of putting a dot in between or spelling all the words together. The dots mark word boundaries, but I am not sure if they are added more for legibility or similarity to ancient ...


11

I know of five kids who are growing up speaking Latin, and I imagine there have to be more that I don't know about. One is Josiah Meadows, who does online spoken Latin lessons himself. You can see him in several YouTube videos here. Another is the now 2-year-old son of an American who lives in (or perhaps not far from) Rome. Two are the kids or stepkids or ...


11

Besides machinator, I found two words for engineer in classical Latin that are primarily directed towards the devising of buildings and fortifications. aedificator A builder, derived from aedes (house, temple) munitor An engineer of fortifications, derived from moenia (walls). An architectus, besides being an architect, could also represent someone who ...


11

This is garbled Latin that looks like the misguided effort of a first-year Latin student (or perhaps, more likely, Google Translate). The meaning (in outline) is clear to me as an English speaker: Perhaps I accept your strident speech. I am Quintus Fabius, the centurion of the star ship "The Hammer of Jesus." What are you, what are you doing in this ...


11

For “online” you could say: colligatus (from colligare) conexus (from conectere, note: long o, single n!) Thus for “offline” you could say: incolligatus inconexus Or you could go a different route and say: seiunctus (from seiungere), or alternatively: disiunctus (from disiungere) These would be technical terms describing the state of a software program ...


10

The suffix -landia is definitely derived from Germanic land. It has no clear cognates outside the Germanic languages and there are some hypotheses that it is a loan from some pre-indogermanic European language and/or that there is a connection to the Basque language. I see no better Latin alternatives for Islandia or Nederlandia, but Finnia is definitely ...


10

A few comments about pre-requisites to teaching students to speak Latin. Accent Concerning the difficulty to reconstitute the accents of Ancient Latin, the question of "what should be the correct accent" should not a subject of concern (English teachers do not worry that accents of the 16th century were markedly different from those of today, even when ...


10

There have already been a few answers, but I have always liked the Morgan and Silva Furman University Lexicon, so here are the terms it gives for "cafe": thermopolium, -i, n. taberna cafearia cafeum cauponula deversorium taberna caldaria domus cafearia This corroborates Ben Kovitz's answer, and provides several other options. The last few options ...


9

Professor Wilifried Stroh's lectures on the history of Latin literature and on other subjects are incredibly entertaining, learned, and eloquent. I don't know when he made them, but since he was born in 1950 I doubt it was before 1960, unfortunately. Still, they're very worth listening to.


9

A Google search reveals several instances of Quod Deus Optime Vertat or simply QDOV in titles of things, but most of them seem similarly ambiguous. However, a letter written on September 21 of 1520 in Frankfurt by Karl Gillert to Conrad Mutianus (as quoted in Historical Sources of the Province of Saxony and Adjacent Areas, volume 18, which seems to contain ...


9

My dictionary translates 'to program' as programmare or programma conficere. If you find a good noun for 'code', you can also combine it with conficere. One possibility is nota, but I'm not entirely happy with it. Regarding your sentence: If you want to use opus for homework, remember that it third declension, not second. To express enjoyment, remember that ...


9

I am using this edition of the Fabulae Divales as a basis for my below answer. quam et In general, Latin prefers to link clauses that would often be independent in English: propter quod, quam ob rem, qua ratione are examples of causal linking. Using the relative pronoun with et (or, even more commonly, autem or enim) has many precedents: it links two ...


9

When you write a story in Latin, whether translating or not, you have two goals: You tell a story. You use Latin. You want to do both well, of course. But there are situations where good storytelling and good Latin are contradictory goals. A place name should be easily recognized (goal 1) but preferably also a declinable Latin word (goal 2). I think the ...


9

There is some division on opinion whether it is good to practice Latin by making translations from English (or another native language), or better to translate solely from Latin authors. Arguments in favour of Latin prose composition and conversation are the active learning aspect, the element of fun involved and the auditory (natural) acquisition of the ...


9

I think that both index and tabula ciborum work as calques but I can’t find any evidence for either in classical sources. Indeed, I can’t find any information about whether there even were menus at tabernae/popinae/cauponae. My understanding is that the foods were simply on display. I also can’t find any evidence for tabella cibariorum but I did find a ...


9

Before the food industry tried to hide these things from us, everyone knew that food could be improved with bacteria. Yoghurt with Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus bulgaricus Cheese with, for example, Penicillium roqueforti Sourdough bread with Lactobacillus plantarum The process known a brine fermentation, where food is kept very warm in ...


9

A key feature of the Winter Bash is having hats. A particular kind of hat, pilleus also played a role in the Roman Saturnalia. To emphasize the role of hats, I would suggest Saturnalia pilleata.


9

The proper word for 'fellow' seems to be socius, at least according to John G. Griffith, the former Public Orator at Oxford University (1973-80) and Fellow and Tutor in Classics, Jesus College (1938-80). Here are a couple of instances from his Oratiunculae Oxonienses Selectae of 1985. Note that socius is distinct from sodalis, which is a mere member: Mihi ...


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