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While one may intuitively think of using me or memet for "myself" here, the thing to keep in mind is that in your sentence "myself" is a predicative nominative - always look at the performed function in the sentence. This tells us we must use the nominative for it, that is ego again. Therefore the phrase is ego sum ego or, for more emphasis, ego egomet ...


4

In classical times, foreign names (except Greek ones) were adopted into Latin based on their sound, not spelling. Suppose Caesar conquered a tribe in Gallia living on an island they called something like Betuwe (I don't know the exact sound/spelling); this word would be related to him in speech by messenger or a local inhabitant. He would hear it well or not ...


1

Considering the number of times that Roman senators made fun of people with provincial accents (Hadrian is a good example), you could probably argue that whatever was spoken in Rome was what was closest to being considered the "standard" or "correct" way to pronounce Latin. On the topic of pronunciation, you might find this post on how it is that we know how ...


1

The two alternative forms Ἀθήνηθεν and ἀπὸ Άθηνῶν have been virtually interchangeable, as you may ascertain from a diachronic text search. St Paul used the latter, of course, but would never use the former -- too archaic. The further back you go, the more the former predominates (down to Ἀθήνῃθεν). That is to say the primary two meanings of ἀπό: motion ...


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