7

In Classical Latin, like in many of the older Indo-European languages, the masculine was very much a "default" gender. (The feminine was a relatively late development within Proto-Indo-European, and it took a few more millennia for it to become as common and well-established as the masculine.) So a group of friends of mixed gender would be, by default, amīcī....


5

Both orders are correct; in general, Latin word order is very flexible. But there is some difference in terms of information structure and pragmatics. Placing Rhenus first in the second sentence has the effect of marking it as a new topic for this sentence. You could capture this in English by saying, "As for the Rhine, where is that?" It's harder to say ...


2

Oxford uses socius for 'fellow' (as in an academic member of a college), which more generally means something like 'partner' or 'member' (of an institution). This suggests something like socius academicus, although academicus would have particular connotations (of association with the Greek philosophers) to a Classical Roman.


2

Varro's Antiquities are probably the most famous example: they were quoted by Priscian (6c) — text in Keil's Grammatici Latini; the "Fasti of Ravenna" were quoted by the Anonymus Valesii, Agnellus (9c), and others (Hodgkin, Italy and Her Invaders, III.178). Cassiodorus had a copy of Seneca's Forma Mundi. Martin of Braga (6c) apparently had two of the younger ...


1

The verbum dicendi is missing. This is fine, because from petiit, we know Lysander is talking to Pharnabazos; this is part of his petition. Allen and Greenough have this to say: The verb of saying etc. is often not expressed, but implied in some word or in the general drift of the sentence


1

Logeion, s.v. impudicus, gives Martial 6.70.5 which mind you isn't specified as being the middle finger. But there's an interesting and amusing commentary on that passage in an article (CJ 47:67) on Roman Elementary Mathematics by J. Hilton Turner, which makes it pretty clear that it was. Elsewhere in the same article, there's a translation of a chunk of ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible