8

lītus, gen. lītŏris “shore” is definitely neuter. Litus saxonicus is thus wrong (unless you mean lĭtus, gen. -ūs “smearing”, which is masculine).


5

In general, verbs that equate two things put the same case on either side of the verb. For example, vocāre "call" in the active can equate two things in the accusative (i.e. two direct objects), and in the passive equates two things in the nominative. For a few examples from Ennius (since he shows up first in my corpus search): Istic est is ...


5

Besides "to be", another verb that acts this way is videor, "to seem" or "appears", which does work as a translation to "looks like" depending on how you use it. (It looks like a dog = I'm not sure what it is but it looks like a dog = It appears to be a dog). Cicero's De Officiis provides a nice example of this usage: ...


3

The Latin word amare, which is of course the root of Spanish "amar," can be freely used both of people and things. When talking about people, it can refer to romantic love, as in the famous line: Vivamus, mea Lesbia, atque amemus (Catullus, Carmen 5) Or it can just refer to general affection, or inclination towards a person. In that meaning it is ...


2

Well, for the latter example, the Carmen Saeculare was indeed sung. From here: Sacrificio perfecto puer. [X]XVII quibus denuntiatum erat patrimi et matrimi et puellae totidem| carmen cecinerunt; eo[de]m modo in Capitolio.| Carmen composuit Q. Hor[at]ius Flaccus.| After the sacrifice is completed, 27 boys for whom it had been made known that their parents ...


2

In episode 8 I think of Legio XIII, Luke Ranierus, definitely one of the best Latin speakers in the world today, referred to himself as a nerd and he used the word 'umbratico' which L&S defines as an effeminate person, as well as one who is fond of the shade. The word was only used 8 times up until 200AD according to packhum. For those words that ...


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