15 votes

Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

I would like to offer a review of both replies posted so far, and offer a couple of my own suggestions which I think are an improvement on both. Laravel's Ave Domine Noctis is in general fine and ...
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11 votes
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Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

The suggestion ave dominus nox misses the mark in two ways: You should be using the vocative case with ave, and here Nox seems to be a name of a lord rather than the word "night". I would ...
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9 votes

Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

The words are correct: "dominus" is indeed the Latin word for "Lord" (see for example the New Testament), "nox" is "night", etc. However, they are not declined ...
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  • 250
8 votes
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Hi omnes lingua: Why lingua is put in singular?

In Latin, like in English, "language" is sometimes treated as an uncountable thing (a "mass noun"). When linguists study "language", it doesn't mean they study only a ...
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6 votes

Is "Ave Dominus Nox" the correct translation for "Hail to the Lord of Night"?

Laravel's answer I think is best for your precise question, but I note that there's a bit of ambiguity with the people here. You have on the one hand the Night Lords and on the other hand the Lord of ...
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  • 39.4k
6 votes

Determine length of vowel

There are a few ideas that could help, depending on how you are learning Latin and (maybe) what for. (Besides a lot of experience): Audio: If you happen to learn from hearing (from a teacher or ...
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  • 10.4k
6 votes

Did individuus refer to individual persons in Ancient Rome?

Seems not. Checking Lewis and Short first shows no usage analogous to "a single person." in-dīvĭdŭus , a, um, adj. 2. in-divido. I. Lit., not divided, indivisible (class.): “arbores,” with ...
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  • 39.4k
5 votes
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Does -que get appended to adjectives?

No. Treat it not like a form of the noun, but a separate word that gets attached at the end. It functions just like et except it goes after, not before the word. See this thread for more information. ...
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3 votes
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Satyricon 136.7-8

…post lectum occisum anserem mitto… …I throw the dead goose behind the bed… …vulnusque cruris haud altum aceto diluo. …and wash the by-no-means-deep wound in my leg with vinegar. This is a neuter ...
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3 votes

Satyricon 136.7-8

No, it's neuter 3rd declension singular. You can check with Perseus' Morph tool if you're ever unsure. If you then click on the definition (under Lewis and Short), you'll see the genitive ends in -is, ...
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3 votes
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In Satyricon 135.4

I'm guessing this is the sentence you're talking about: Tum clavum, qui detrahentem secutus cum camella lignea fuerat, fumoso parieti reddidit. Then [Oenothea] replaced the nail, which had followed [...
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2 votes
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I'm looking for a stable English to Latin translation for the below quote

You need a few things left to make it grammatical. First, the "for" in the beginning is missing. You have two options for that. One is nam at the beginning (nam magnum opus) and the other is ...
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2 votes

Determine length of vowel

I'd say you can't. The macra in the dictionary are an early form of pronunciation guide. Learn it by heart by pronouncing it out loud, or practise with fluent speakers so you get the correct length ...
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1 vote
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doodle (verb & noun) scribble absent-mindedly/ a rough drawing made absent-mindedly

I would say something like: ōtiōsum (either subject or object) or ōtiōsē nescioquid dēlīneāre > dēlīneāmenta ōtiōsa; also vānum, leve nescioquid; scrībere would probably refer to words; in ...
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