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This is a list of three names of freedmen (former slaves that were released by their master). Roman male names for free citizens in classical time usually consisted of three parts (known as tria nomina): Praenomen, Nomen gentile, Cognomen. Examples: (Praenomen) Marcus (Nomen gentile) Tullius (Cognomen) Cicero (Praenomen) Gaius (Nomen gentile) Julius (...


7

It is to be found in Seneca the Younger, De Providentia (On Providence), book 1, chapter 4, section 16 Non est arbor solida nec fortis nisi in quam frequens ventus incursat


5

As far as the base 50% vocab, a standard textbook like Wheelock will get you there. I agree with Colin that you should skip the OLD. That's more useful for prose/poetry composition. Instead, rely on Geoffrey Steadman's free online Ceasar and Cicero, and you won't need a dictionary at all. Steadman's free Caesar, Cicero pdfs for intermediate readers You may ...


4

Pronunciation of Latin in 17th century Europe Although Erasmus a century earlier made an early attempt at reconstructing Classical pronunciation, it didn't catch on. Different national pronunciations were used in each country in the 17th century. This also applied to Catholic countries, and the Catholic Church in France for example, which used their own ...


4

You definitely do not need the OLD, which costs several hundred dollars, and while wonderful, would be incredibly cumbersome to your reading. A copy of Cassell's will do fine. You can also download a copy of Lewis & Shorts Latin Dictionary from the Google Playstore, it's free, and pretty gosh darn good. At least to start with Cicero, I'd recommend a ...


4

For the most part, the upper classes in Rome still spoke Classical Latin in the 2nd century AD. Features in common with Classical Latin c - hard, as /k/. The softening came much later. g - hard, as /g/ (although whether it was still /ŋ/ before "n", or had become a simple /g/ there too by this time, is unclear). h - the educated élite probably ...


3

I also find it strange you'd discount the Vulgate, the work (while composed of smaller works), was a singular translation effort by one individual. In essence, it is a singular, continuous text by one author with a ballpark of 600,000+ words. In response to the comments: Jerome did start mostly from scratch and didn't just use the Vetus Latina. I'm ...


3

I offer three small additions to an excellent answer. First, Latin is like most Indo-European languages in that its syntax allows sentences with multiple subordinate clauses. Many other language families do not, e.g. sentences in modern written Chinese contain very few subordinate clauses, but they are often very long. Bureaucratic writers tend to pile up ...


3

I do not know a Latin–English dictionary that gives simple, accessible, clearly structured usage notes for verbs and simple, stripped-down examples. If such a dictionary exists, I would expect it to be found in the educational market, catering to students of Latin in secondary school. I know this is an English language website, and non-English dictionaries ...


2

You could go biblical with your translation: "meum calix meus inebrians." A common translation is "my cup is overflowing." Literally, it means "my chalice is intoxicating me." I think the famousness of this phrase means its metaphorical meaning will be appreciated over the literal reading. This is from Psalm 23. http://bibleglot....


2

Yes, that is absolutely correct! You have identified the long and short syllables correctly, and from that the scansion follows. To be sure, it is always good to check that the pattern fits the metre and there is a natural place for at least one caesura. Once these all check out, your scansion is usually right.


2

There is actually a pretty good equivalent: Tam facile quam pirum volpes comest. (as easy as a fox eats a pear). Originally from Plautus: tam facile vinces quam pirum volpes comest. There might be an ambiguity in this expression as the footnote in my linked doc suggests (However, it seems most sources does treat this as "as easy .."): This may ...


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