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9

The word is tĭmĕō, so the vowels are short, short, and long. The stress is indeed on the first syllable according to the standard stress rules in Latin. Thus the e is neither long nor stressed, so I agree that any kind of emphasis on it would be awkward. The stress on the first syllable is the standard stress in prose, but in metric poetry ...


5

The complete answer has already be given by Joonas Ilmavirta; here are a few words on the prosody, which however only makes sense if you say the complete verse. As we know, these are the last words of Laocoön's speech (and, sadly, of his whole life), trying to persuade his fellows Trojans to not receive the horse from the Greeks. The whole verse (Æneid, II, ...


5

Though it is not about a specific person, there is a famous passage in Augustine's City of God XVI.8 about intersex people: As for the Androgyni, or Hermaphrodites, as they are called, though they are rare, yet from time to time there appears persons of sex so doubtful, that it remains uncertain from which sex they take their name; though it is customary ...


3

"Lorem ipsum" is the name for a class of text used by printers and book designers to facilitate the layout of a Page. The fact that it has no meaning helps focus attention on, say, margins and the weight of the type chosen for headings and footnotes. Printers believe that it comes from a speech by Cicero; but if so it has been so hacked about and reassembled ...


3

Along with the terms mentioned by Rafael, there is another word: arreptitius. It wasn't used in Classical Latin and in modern Ecclesiastical Latin it seems not to be used either, but in the works of St. Thomas Aquinas it's quite frequent; in questions concerning actions of demons, I found uniquely this term for the possessed. From the context (like I-II, q. ...


3

Apparently, the e in eius could be long (normal) or short (see Lewis & Short). The one in peius seems to be normally long as well. There can be quite a bit of irregularity in the length of vowels in Latin, especially in very common words such as pronouns.


2

"The past shall live" implies that it is currently dead; awaiting, presumably, a resurrection. How about present tense, vivit, as in historia vivit = history lives. The sense, the past segues into the future at a "junction" called the present; therefore, both "live" in the present. Alternatively, there is no present, just a perpetual transition between past/ ...


2

On the other hand, it is perfectly classical Latin to use a proper noun and a common noun in apposition as in “urbs Roma”. If you want to take “Crater” as the English name of the lake you can write “lacus Crater”.


2

That sounds perfectly fine to me. You are correct about the genitive. An alternative could be Lacus Craterae; for both crater and cratera exist, with the same meaning, which includes the drinking-vessel and a volcanic crater. It is conceivable that the Romans might have used an adjective, like ?craterius or similar, but I have not found actual use of this. ...


1

A girl (not woman. Not "young woman", that's a modern concepts), in most of the ancient cultures (I don't talk about modern cultures, that's different), was a woman who were not married. When a girl was married, she became a woman (it wasn't a matter of age, but a matter of status: being married = to be a woman. Quite different with the nubility.) And as a ...


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