7

Five years later, I return to give a different answer. In my previous answer, I claimed: In Classical Latin, there were no words exactly corresponding to "yes" and "no". Non and ne were negatives, but they needed to combine with other words (like "not" in English). This is what I learned for formal Ciceronian or Caesarian ...


3

The quotation is attributed to Appius Claudius Caecus by the Pseudo-Sallust, Epistula ad Caesarem senem de republica 1,1,2: sed res docuit id verum esse, quod in carminibus Appius ait, fabrum esse suae quemque fortunae. The phrase is usually quoted in nominative (Faber est suae quisque fortunae): your reworking, which is just a change in the word order, is ...


3

I am not sure how this system works, but here's what seems to be the case: Pecus, pecoris (n) which can refer to a herd of livestock, like horses, donkeys, mules, cattle, etc. Pecus, pecudis is feminine, and means one herd animal, and the plural is used to refer to the many herd animals. The feminine pecus can mean basically any large livestock, so sheep, ...


2

The Latin for "constellation" is (surprise surprise) "constellatio". It is not exactly classical, though L/S do have a citation from Ammianus Marcellinus (4th century). In older sources we do find "astrum", but this can also be a single star, and not necessarily a constellation. "Constellatio" is unambiguous.


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