14

That's what Quintilian implicitly said in his Institutio Oratoria (in the 1st century CE), and there's no real reason to doubt him in this case: the fact that the earliest attested plural form (in Plautus' Poenulus, almost three centuries earlier) is avo rather than avēte conforms to it being a Punic loan, and the Punic certainly started with ḥ (/ħ/ rather ...


9

As Nickimite has pointed out, Greece is Graecia, so the accusative would be Graeciam. But that is not how you say where someone is and remains. How exactly you say that depends on how you describe their dwelling place; however for regions and countries it's simply in + ablative – so that would be in Graecia. For the names of cities and small islands and a ...


9

If you want something analogous to another phrase, you can edit your question to provide the original Latin one to be varied. Adapting a single word would be easy. Without any context, a decent translation would be: Quid faceret Caesar? The imperfect conjunctive is used for conditions that you know never to be realized, and that indeed seems to be the case: ...


7

I would not read the genitive and the gerund together. I suggest this reordering and grouping to clarify: …(plus operae) poneremus (in agendo) quam (in scribendo)… ≈ …we would put more work into doing than writing… I see operae as a genitive qualifying plus. You could conceivably read in scribendo epistularum as "in the writing of letters", ...


6

The Greek word that means briny is ἁλμυρός and appears in both Homer and Hesiod. For example: Grant lovely song and celebrate the holy race of the deathless gods who are for ever, those that were born of Earth and starry Heaven and gloomy Night and them that briny Sea did rear. (Hesiod, Theogony, 106-108) However it doesn't appear as a description of the ...


5

As pointed out in the previous answers, it seems quite clear that plus...operae is an argument of the verb poneremus. I found that some philologists corrected the text as follows: in agendo plus quam in scribendo operam poneremus (e.g. see here), which led me to misinterpret the syntax of this example (see the relevant comment by cnread, who alerted me of ...


4

No, this construction is impossible because it has nominal syntax (hoc domūs tēctum "this house roof") like the English gerund, while the Latin gerund has verbal syntax (not *in hōc scrībendō "in this writing") and governs the same case as the verb (not *epistolārum scrībere "to write of-letters"). With verbs that govern the ...


3

I group the words in the Cicero passage this way: (in agendo plus quam in scribendo) (operae poneremus) This makes operae some sort of object of poneremus—I can't tell if it's dative or genitive. Some googling suggests that aliquid operae pono is an idiom for "I put effort into something." Loeb Classical Library gives this translation (by Walter ...


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