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Wiktionary has over 350 reconstructed terms for Latin. Each of these have been proposed by linguists based on etymological evidence. Each page for these terms is described as follows: This Latin entry contains reconstructed words and roots. As such, the term(s) in this entry are not directly attested, but are hypothesized to have existed based on ...


11

I would go with Mors humanae gentis inimicis. This is a literal translation that follows the original pretty closely: mors "death", humanae gentis "of the human race, of mankind", inimicis "to the enemies". Latin word order is flexible; this order sounds best to me, but others would be grammatically correct too. (Note that if you ask Google Translate, ...


11

A good word for "liar," which can be used either as an adjective or as a noun alone, is mendax, -cis. Here's Plautus in Truculentus: D. Redin an non redis? A. Vocat me quae in me potest plus quam potes. D. Vno verbo A. Eloquere. D. Mittin me intro? A. Mendax es, abi. unum aiebas, tria iam dixti verba, atque ea mendacia. My quick translation: ...


8

According to L&S, the adjective mendax was used as a noun to mean liar: I.given to lying, mendacious; subst., a liar. I. Lit.: “mendacem esse adversus aliquem,” Plaut. Poen. 1, 2, 188: “cum mendaci homini, ne verum quidem dicenti, credere soleamus,” Cic. Div. 2, 71, 146: “Carthaginienses fraudulenti et mendaces,” id. Agr. 2, 35, 95: “...


6

It depends on the exact word they'd be trying to borrow. Proto-Germanic was spoken in the first centuries CE and the Proto-Germanic word reflected as English dune is reconstructed as *dūnǭ or *dūnaz; the latter would be a straightforward dūnus (compare e.g. rattus 'rat' < PGmc *rattaz), the former likely dūnō (third declension, like sāpō 'soap' < PGmc *...


5

The selenographical names can perhaps be viewed as appositions and would as such not be ungrammatical (Latin appositions may be incongruent in number or gender, like urbs Athenae). In that case both parts would have to be declined in parallel, e.g. Videsne Montes Agricolam? In my opinion one should take this as scientific terminology based on Latin, not ...


5

The fact that all Romance languages (even Romanian) have borrowed forms of the Germanic "dune" suggests that the Romans did not have a word for it.


4

It means you shouldn't do it. My four favorite Latin dictionaries, Lewis and Short, Traupman, Chambers-Murray, and Stelton all let me down on the meaning of non oportet, but I finally found an answer in Woodcock's New Latin Syntax, Number 123. He cites Non te oportebat illi argentum reddere (you ought not to have paid him the money) and, in Livy 5,4,9, non ...


4

The list is probably very close to this: ἄγνυμι ἄημι βίβημι δάμνημι δίδημι δίδωμι δαίνυμι δείκνυμι εἰμί εἶμι ἕννυμι εἵργνυμι ἔργνυμι ζεύγνυμι ζώννυμι ἵημι ἵλημι ἵστημι κίδνημι κίχρημι κεδάννυμι κεράννυμι κορέννυμι κρεμάννυμι κρήμνημι κτίννυμι μίγνυμι μείγνυμι οἴγνυμι ὄλλυμι ὄμνυμι ὀμόργνυμι ὀνίνημι ὀρέγνυμι ὄρνυμι πέρνημι πήγνυμι πίμπλημι πίμπρημι πίτνημι ...


4

It's a bit silly, but you have to remember that most Latin-English dictionaries are somewhat archaic in their writing. So depending which dictionary WordHippo is backed by, you may have to try a few different English synonyms, especially fancier-sounding or more literary ones. The verb I'd recommend is lacrimāre, which Lewis and Short (one of the classic ...


3

Although the word terra is the usual way of speaking of the Earth, some form of tellūs is also a possibility. The latter is used in this sense most commonly in poetry. According to the lexicon of Lewis and Short, it is defined as: tellus — the earth, opp. to the other planets or to the sea, the globe (a word belonging almost entirely to poetry). My ...


3

Lectio cithara canendi. Your answer is fine, except that cithara should be in the ablative to go with canendum. But I will humbly suggest lectio rather than instructio, not because instructio can't work (it can), but because lectio is the medieval and neo-latin word for "lesson". Indeed, it would be more correct historically to say that "lesson" is the ...


3

A quick translation of that phrase could be something like: "Moriendum Hostibus Hominum" This is a straightforward translation of what you're looking for. Many words could replace moriendum in this phrase, like fatum, letum, exitium, mors etc. I chose moriendum because it rounds out the phrase with a starting -um and an ending -um. That sentential symmetry ...


2

There are a lot of good answers here, but the one I like best is in the OP's question, minister and ministra. It is true that minister has a somewhat broader meaning than "waiter", but if you are in a restaurant setting, I don't think there will be any ambiguity. I also note that John Traupman's dictionary lists minister when you look up "waiter" in the ...


2

The Irish word "dún" means a "fort" and has meant that since the Early Irish period as far as I am aware, also Modern Welsh "dinas" means a city (Old Welsh "din"), both the Irish and Welsh words appear in placenames usually suggesting a fort, or fortified hill or promontory. I wonder if the Gaulish word "dunom" generally meant 'fort' too during the Roman ...


1

You mentioned that you are using Wiktionary and Wordhippo as dictionaries. Unfortunately neither of them is very good. A good dictionary would not only explain the translations but also give enough information to find all the forms of the word. A single headword is not enough. Wiktionary is the better one of the two. Our site has a list of freely available ...


1

How about "they shall die" - moriuntor hostis humanitatis


1

Some examples from the Vulgate: 2 Kings 3:15 nunc autem adducite mihi psalten cumque caneret psaltes facta est super eum manus Domini et ait But now bring me a minstrel. And it came to pass, when the minstrel played, that the hand of the Lord came upon him. (In modern Welsh, the word "canu" means "to sing", but it is also used to say playing an ...


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