20

The source of this Latin ATM message, as confirmed is a few profiles (such as this one from the Catholic Herald and this one from The Telegraph) is the lately-deceased Reginald Foster, who was arguably one of the greatest Latin speakers of the past century. The Vatican Diaries, pg. 196 quotes Foster's own translation: The elevator whirred quietly to the top ...


16

You seem to be addressing several issues in this question. To start from the bottom line: Latin is already being used right now as a daily casual language. Not even a small reserve about this statement. The external world changes, and new words are born. It happens in every language and Latin is no exception to that. New words are finally integrated into the ...


16

Vaccinate is already a Latinate word, so to go back into Latin is very easy. The -ate ending should indicate to you that the word is first conjugation: vaccino, vaccinare, vaccinavi, vaccinatus This makes etymological sense, because it's ultimately derived from a Latin word, vacca meaning "cow." The adjectival form of vacca is vaccinus, -a, -um (...


15

Welcome to the site! Non ministrari, sed ministrare (VG Mt 20,28) Is a well-attested phrase with that exact meaning. It literally means not to be served but to serve. The context is Jesus in the Gospel of Matthew saying that He (the Son of man) came not to be served but to serve. Update: it is (arguably) a common choice for mottos. Besides the American ...


14

A good source for election-related vocabulary will probably be the Commentariolum Petitionis, written by Quintus Tullius Cicero for the benefit of his more famous brother Marcus ahead of the latter's successful bid for the consulate (presumably, but the authenticity is questionable—it is possible the text was actually written by an unknown post-Augustean ...


13

Latin is used regularly within the Vatican and Catholic Church, so depending on what you mean by daily usage I think that fulfills that requirement. There are also a lot of loan words that make their way into modern Latin, both historically and currently. For example, Vicipaedia, the Latin version of Wikipedia. Latin is also used regularly on this site for ...


13

Although the English word comes from Latin (through the Romance languages), Latin uses a different word. The Latin word actually does appear in English, but in a different meaning. The starting point is the verb ambire, literally "to go around". (Although derived from ire, this verb seems to follow the fourth conjugation.) It is used very commonly ...


12

Manuductio (verb: manuduco) is a late Latin word that literally means, "leading by the hand." See, for instance, "Mind Forming and Manuductio in Aquinas" (pay-wall protected), which discusses the word in the works of Thomas Aquinas. The Dictionnaire latin-français des auteurs du Moyen-Age gives as its earliest citation a work by Thomas ...


12

Although I believe that tony's suggestion of vir ingeniosus would work pretty well, I do think one would want to use the superlative degree of the adjective (vir ingeniosissimus or vir maxime ingeniosus), since 'genius' goes beyond garden-variety cleverness or talent that the positive degree suggests. Another, related possibility is to use a noun phrase such ...


11

My first thought was exhaurire and indeed in his Epistulae Seneca writes to Lucilius: Librum tuum quem mihi promiseras accepi. [...] exhausi totum. I've received your book you had promised me. [...] I've exhausted it all.


10

I would suggest simply: Ede, bibe, gaude! Or to several people: Edite, bibite, gaudete! I prefer to keep something like this simple and avoid prefixed verbs or other unnecessary detours. I like making a holiday greeting as accessible as possible to everyone with a limited knowledge of Latin. For eating and drinking the simplest verbs are edere and bibere. ...


10

"Is this just a phonetic thing in this word, rather than a semantic one?" Yep. In fact, as Smyth says, αἰδώς is the only such "-οσ- stem" word in Attic. (In Homer you will also find ἠώς "dawn", which in Attic declines as an "Attic declension" noun, on which see below). So it might as well be considered irregular. The ...


10

Oxford gives "genius" = "vir ingeniosus" (English-to-Latin); checking the corresponding (Latin-to-English), adjective, "ingeniosus" = "clever", "ingenious"; "naturally suited to...".


10

Fortunately, almost all Classical Latin texts are in the public domain, since almost all Classical Latin authors have been dead for about two thousand years. Translations and commentaries are a different matter, but to the best of my knowledge, the exact words of Cicero and Vergil as transcribed from a manuscript are not under copyright anywhere in the world....


10

One option is ceterum, used famously by (some who paraphrase) Cato: Ceterum censeo Carthaginem esse delendam. Anyway, I think Carthage should be destroyed. Some would translate it as "furthermore" or "moreover" here, but "anyway" works too.


9

I would suggest vas, -is, which has the somewhat unusual plural vasa, -orum. The first thing I thought of when I heard the word "vessel" was II Corinthians 4:7. Here, St. Paul speaks of how an immaterial gift ("the light of the knowledge of God's glory") is received in our fragile bodies: But we have this treasure in earthen vessels, ...


9

There would of course be many possibilities, but I believe the verb sinere comes closest to “let.” It can be used in various ways – with an AcI, with ut – but the most compact form would be a bare subjunctive. “Let me love” then would be: Sine amem – and while I did not find that specific expression in the literature, I did find in Plautus' Casina (2,2; ...


9

Almost correct. The most common spelling of "never" in Latin is numquam. Fecit is the third-person, to get the first person just drop that t: feci Together you get: Numquam feci. Now, this corresponds to the act of making something. If you had a fuller sentence, we would be able to tell you if this is the correct idiom to use. Remember that ...


9

See: Does "Ego Peccator" mean "I'm Sinner"? For the plural, it would be peccatores. Scelesti is more "the wicked," which is not the same as peccatores in Christian theology. In Romans 3.23, for example, Paul writes that: omnes enim peccaverunt For all have sinned Scelesti however would be a sinner without redemption, ...


9

@TKR is right about the specific case of αἰδώς and mentioned the Attic declension, but there's more to say: there is a good number of Greek nouns ending in -ως even outside the Attic declension, and the question of whether it's a meaningful suffix for forming words out of other words there is worth asking. Going through Wiktionary's list of Greek nouns and ...


9

Yes, μαθητεία is a word that would certainly be understood in this context, though in practice it was usual to talk about someone being a μαθητής to someone rather than about μαθητεία in the abstract. This applies not just in the context of manual craftsmanship but for any τέχνη, including e.g. rhetoric.


9

The two words in the Vulgate are very literal translations of the words in the Greek original, which has ἐκ τῶν μνημείων [ek tōn mnēmeiōn] in 27:53 and ἀπέναντι τοῦ τάφου [apenanti tou tafou] in 27:61. Since μνημεῖον [mnēmeion] is etymologically related to μνήμη [mnēmē, "memory"], it is translated monumentum ["tomb, memorial", from moneo],...


9

According to Döderlein's Hand-book of Latin Synonymes (also here), canere is the more general term for music (and thus may be used for singing), whereas cantare usually is used more specifically to refer to vocal music: Canere (from καναχεῖν) means, in the most general sense, to make music, voce, tibiis, fidibus, like μέλπειν; cantare, with vocal music, ...


9

You'll have to choose different words for precise meanings. One option is to use the intensifier ipse (which is functionally what "very" is doing in your third example). The dictionary gives a good analogue to your examples: ea enim ipsa hora acceperam tuas litteras, "For it was at this very hour that I received your letter." (Cic. Fam. ...


9

Scaena, though it really means 'the background...against which a play...is performed' (Oxford Latin dictionary), is used by extension to refer to the location or setting of a play, because, after all, the background (even if it consisted of just 3 doorways in the wall at the back of the stage) represented that location. For example, in my Oxford edition of ...


9

The word order that is considered somewhat standard would be: Curia iura novit So, yes, I would say that the word order probably reflects a certain emphasis. This is explained by Thomas K. Arnold: The degree of prominence and emphasis to be given to a word is that which mainly determines its position in the sentence. And: The two emphatic positions in a ...


8

An urbs is a city, an oppidum is a town. It is quite common to use urbs to refer specifically to Rome, and the linked dictionary entry even says that oppidum is used for other cities than Rome. You could say that urbs is a capital and oppidum is a regular city. There are a number of ways to phrase and see it, but the crux is: urbs is bigger (in size or ...


8

I would say, in a sense, tandem is little different from the rest, as tandem tends to imply pressure that was accumulating and being released, or something that was expected and finally happens (i.e. Not necessarily after sequence of events). Thus, you can see tandem used to intensify a question to indicate asker's stress. Practically speaking, in the title ...


8

It is indeed ἡμι- 'half' + ὅλος 'whole', but there's a third component, -ιος, which forms adjectives, usually but not exclusively out of nouns, indicating the possession of a characteristic of the prototype word (as in e.g. ἀρχή 'beginning' → ἀρχαῖος 'primeval', θάλασσα 'sea' → θαλάσσιος 'maritime', Λέσβος 'Lesbos' → Λέσβιος 'Lesbian', &c.), as ἡμιόλιος ...


8

Ancient Greek plays weren't exactly divided into "acts" in the modern sense; they had a more complex structure, based largely on alternation between dialogue scenes and choral odes. A basic description of the overall structure of a tragedy can be found, for example, here (under "Divisions of a play"). [ETA: as C.M. Weimer points out in ...


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