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Translating "Nocte volat caelī mediō"

As an adjective, indeed, medius, -a, -um does not take a genitive. However, there is a noun, the substantive medium, -i, which also means "middle" or "midst." Referring to a ...
cmw's user avatar
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12 votes

Why can "bubo" ("owl") be feminine or masculine?

The relevant passage is this one, from Aeneid IV.462-3: sōlaque culminibus fērālī carmine būbo saepe quer' et longās in flētum dūcere vōcēs And the lone owl on the rooftops would cry out its mournful ...
Draconis's user avatar
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12 votes
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Omnia vincit amor: vincere or vincire?

As a first point, you are certainly not the first person to recognize this. I found a delightful little poem composed in the 19th century by a certain Piré that uses this same word-play: Omnia Vincit ...
brianpck's user avatar
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11 votes

Potentially Ambiguous Subject for a Verb in the Aeneid

Grammatically, the subject must be the bough, because qui, the relative pronoun that refers to ramum, is nominative. In the clause 'which she was hiding', 'which' is the direct object; so the ...
cnread's user avatar
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10 votes
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Length of i in Vergilius' "ferentis"

ACC.PL. is fĕrĕntīs. The final syllable is superheavy, i.e. it consists of three morae. FYI, the latest Teubner edition of Aeneis (Conte 2009) uses "ferentis", and so does Mynors 1969: aut ...
Alex B.'s user avatar
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9 votes

Negative Future Imperatives

Negative future imperatives do indeed exist. A great many can be found in the laws of twelve tables. Example: Hominem mortuum in urbe ne sepelito Do not bury a dead person in the city Judging ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
9 votes

Potentially Ambiguous Subject for a Verb in the Aeneid

English is unhelpful here, as "hide" can be transitive or intransitive. However, the verb lateo, latere is intransitive. It doesn't mean to hide something, but rather to lie hidden or to be hidden. It'...
cmw's user avatar
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9 votes
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Extra initial Aeneid lines in 1662 M. de Marolles version

Fascinating question! I've found some editions of the Aeneid with these extra lines included, and some (most) without. It seems that they aren't found in any of the oldest manuscripts of the Aeneid (...
Draconis's user avatar
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9 votes
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Meaning of a present participle in a verse of Vergil's Eclogue 8

It is a typical feature of Latin that participles are used instead of finite verbs, even where we would not expect that in our own languages, or it would sound stilted. This is frequently encountered ...
Sebastian Koppehel's user avatar
8 votes
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What is the opposite of "aegrescit medendo"?

The reference from Virgil is to Aeneid XII, 46, aegrescitque medendo (in the combat between Aeneas and Turnus). The opposite is easily and exactly rendered as convalescit medendo. There may not be a ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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8 votes
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Can a supine verb have arguments?

Looking at it, I don't think me is ablative; it's more likely an accusative as the subject of an indirect statement with credere. Discessu here is not a supine, but a fourth-declension noun, discessus....
cmw's user avatar
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8 votes

Length of i in Vergilius' "ferentis"

It's definitely long, because the vowel of that i-stem acc. pl. ending, -īs, is always long, as any good grammar will tell you. (If the form was gen. sg., of course, it would be short, but that doesn'...
TKR's user avatar
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8 votes

Why is the subjunctive used in Vergil's Georgics, 3,250?

It's an indirect question following the interrogative ut, which takes the subjunctive: Surely you see how... For ut used in this way, see its Lewis & Short entry.
cmw's user avatar
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7 votes

Is -um (instead of -ōrum) a typical genitive plural ending outside of poetry?

I believe it is also used in prose with certain words, like deum and virum, although it is indeed less common. Livius, Ab Urbe Condita V 14.4: ... pestilentiam agris urbique [esse] inlatam haud ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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7 votes

Translation of Lines 333–336 of Vergil's Aeneid Book 4

Your second translation is pretty close to the mark. Let's go through the translation step by step. Let us first recall to mind the context: Dido has just finished a long harangue (4:305-330) ...
brianpck's user avatar
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7 votes
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A type of subordinating construction governing the dative?

Yes, I would by all means supply est. The phrase fas est is a fixed combination either introducing an a.c.i. or governing a complementary/supplementary infinitive plus the latter's arguments. The est ...
Cerberus's user avatar
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7 votes

Why can "bubo" ("owl") be feminine or masculine?

Since the Virgil's passage in question happens to start with 'Tum' I have to contribute something... (This is not an answer but I see no way of putting this as a comment due to formatting issues.) ...
tum_'s user avatar
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7 votes

Vergil Book XII, Line 756 | Meter Question

First, let us check all vowel lengths: tŭm vērō ĕxŏrĭtŭr clāmŏr rīpaequĕ lăcūsquĕ A syllable with a short vowel ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
6 votes

George Duckworth's Vergilius?

The full citation is: Duckworth, G. W. 1940. "Turnus as a Tragic Character." Vergilius 4: 5-17. This is the fourth volume of the journal and was published in 1940. It seems the article is not ...
cmw's user avatar
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6 votes

Can a supine verb have arguments?

The second supine (ending with -u) can only be combined with adjectives, or with fas and nefas. Examples: iucundum cognitu atque auditu nefas est dictu A second supine verb never has an object, but ...
piscator's user avatar
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6 votes
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Fifth spondee in Aeneis I.690

The name Ĭūlus is trisyllabic. It's listed as such in dictionaries, e.g. L&S, and there's ample metrical evidence for this, though much of it is indirect. A search for forms of Iūlus in the ...
TKR's user avatar
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5 votes
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Can Latin "inde" introduce a temporal clause?

Regarding the question in the title, Lewis and Short (seemingly this community's favorite dictionary) lists among the meanings of inde the following: from that time, thenceforward, since, after that, ...
Rafael's user avatar
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5 votes
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Is -um (instead of -ōrum) a typical genitive plural ending outside of poetry?

@Cerberus is right that it does appear in prose in limited circumstances. In addition to deum and virum, genitive plurals of second declension nouns denoting money or measure often end in -um: Nam ...
Joel Derfner's user avatar
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5 votes

Translation of Lines 333–336 of Vergil's Aeneid Book 4

You might enjoy Dryden's famous — but magnificently erratic — translation, completed in 1697 : . . . and thus at length replies, / "Fair Queen, you never can enough repeat / Your boundless favours, ...
Tom Cotton's user avatar
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5 votes

George Duckworth's Vergilius?

I found this is the Cambridge University Library catalogue: Title: Vergilius. Other Entries: Vergilian Society. Published: Atlanta, GA: Vergilian Society, 1956- Publication history: Began with vol. 1,...
fdb's user avatar
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5 votes

Parsing "oblita carmina"

Lewis and short cite this very passage as an example of oblisci being used passively. So there's your answer, "forgotten songs": http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%...
Figulus's user avatar
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5 votes

Parsing "oblita carmina"

The practice of using deponent participles in a passive sense occurs with other verbs besides obliscor, as noted by Ethan Allen Andrews and Solomon Stoddard in A Grammar of the Latin Language: For the ...
Expedito Bipes's user avatar
4 votes
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Does the avenger arise from bones or ashes?

Perseus offers two English translations of Aeneid, including your passage. Theodore C. Williams, 1910, writes: Arise, Out of my dust, unknown Avenger, rise! John Dryden writes: Rise some ...
Joonas Ilmavirta's user avatar
4 votes

Parsing "oblita carmina"

Accepting the kind invitation by Ben (Sententiam tuam de passiv[a] resultativ[a] audiendi studiosus sum), here is my opinion on how to analyze oblita carmina (sunt is omitted) in this example. As I ...
Mitomino's user avatar
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4 votes

"Omnia vincit amor, et nos cedamus amori" -- why "et nos" and not "nos et"?

As this website explains: On occasions, Virgil permits himself a certain licence in his metrication, when he lengthens syllables at the end of words which would normally be short both by nature and ...
alphabet's user avatar
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