18 votes
Accepted

Why isn't "Puto deus fio" grammatically incorrect?

In this case I would read puto more as a side remark to the clause deus fio. You could emphasize this with punctuation: Puto: deus fio. I think: I'm becoming a god. The verb puto is indeed ...
13 votes
Accepted

Can a gerund introduce a subordinate clause?

It has been my experience that gerunds can pretty freely introduce subordinate clauses. For example, in Livy, Ab urbe condita 3.39.2, the ablative of the gerund introduces an indirect command (as in ...
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7 votes
Accepted

On the syntax of 'Cogitate quantis laboribus fundatum imperium (...) una nox paene delerit' (Cic. Cat. 4, 19)

Summary: the reason why this sentence seems unusual after translation is only because of the limits of English syntax, not because anything odd in the Latin. A short form of expression combining two ...
  • 19.1k
7 votes
Accepted

Fieri potest with final ut or explicative quod

I've never seen fieri potest, quod. I find however several examples of fieri potest, ut subjunctive in the corpora; the first two are: Si hoc fieri potest ut in hac civitate quae longe iure ...
7 votes
Accepted

A type of subordinating construction governing the dative?

Yes, I would by all means supply est. The phrase fas est is a fixed combination either introducing an a.c.i. or governing a complementary/supplementary infinitive plus the latter's arguments. The est ...
  • 19.1k
6 votes

Choosing conjunctive tenses in a clause subordinate to a subordinate clause

This is what Adolf V. Streng (Latinan kielioppi, 5th edition, 1936) says in §161.2: Finnish: Toisen tahi kolmannen asteen konjunktiivinen sivulause mukautuu predikaattinsa tempuksen puolesta sitä ...
6 votes

Consecutio temporum et praesens historicum

In English, your consecutio temporum is usually called the ‘sequence of tenses’. There is a general rule that in the principal sentence (i) a primary tense is followed in the subordinate clause by a ...
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6 votes
Accepted

Subjunctive with adverb “quam”

This is an indirect question and indirect questions always use the subjunctive (also known as conjunctive) mood. If you want more examples and details, please the linked discussion in Allen and ...
5 votes
Accepted

Why does this sentence have an ablative subject for an indirect subordinate clause?

The accusative subject of the sentence you highlight is actually tot miracula. Let's go through it step by step: Vix scit... He hardly knows that... [setting us for an accusative + infinitive] ...
  • 37.3k
5 votes
Accepted

Can Latin "inde" introduce a temporal clause?

Regarding the question in the title, Lewis and Short (seemingly this community's favorite dictionary) lists among the meanings of inde the following: from that time, thenceforward, since, after that, ...
  • 10.7k
5 votes

Choosing conjunctive tenses in a clause subordinate to a subordinate clause

If we have a subordinate clause depending on superordinate conjunctive clause, we must consider the tense of the conjunctive: (A) present or perfect "logic" (assimilable to a present), it should be ...
  • 2,886
4 votes

Superlatives In Subordinate Clauses

Their “superlative” here is just a convenient way of saying “the word primus”. Or, you might well think, an unnecessarily elegant way of saying it. It is not the superlativeness of the word which ...
4 votes
Accepted

Deploying "Ut"/ "Quod"/ "Quin" plus Subjunctive

non quidem est dubium quin ceteros duces aspernandi causa hoc dixerit... "There is indeed no doubt that he said this in order to upset the other generals." You could translate it thus, but a (...
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4 votes

Jenney's Second Year Latin, Lesson 12, exercise E: Ut clauses and how to translate English infinitives

Here are some comments: 1a: The infinitive cannot express purpose in Latin like it can in English. See this earlier question, for example. 1h&i: The rules of consecutio temporum require that a ...
4 votes

Is ūnō a relative pronoun in this sentence?

The adjective contentus (satisfied, content) can be modified with ablative. For example, viro contentus means "satisfied with a/the man". In your case the attribute has two words: unus vir (uno viro ...
4 votes
Accepted

What is the difference between cum, quia and quod in a causal clause?

This is only a partial answer and in need of further substantiation, but I'll post it for what's it's worth. First, as to the difference between quod and quia. Though these are often treated as ...
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4 votes
Accepted

(Informal) Indirect Speech

No, that does not explain the subjunctive, because no reason or explanatory fact is introduced by the quod. Therefore Allen & Greenough's § 592 does not apply. Please note that the section you ...
4 votes

Why does this sentence have an ablative subject for an indirect subordinate clause?

In this sentence, hoc anno is not the subject of esse. The subject of this infinitive is tot miracula (Acc. pl.). I'm afraid what you're missing is the following fact: you should not expect ...
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3 votes

Why isn't "Puto deus fio" grammatically incorrect?

As Joonas noted, puto is parenthetical. I'll just add, by way of comparison, that Claudius's ultima vox in Seneca's Apocolocyntosis was 'vae me, puto, concacavi me.'
  • 18.3k
3 votes
Accepted

Confusion between Direct Speech / Subordinate Clause(s) / Indirect Speech

I am not sure whether you mean that these words are uttered by Pilate or a narrator. Let us build the sentences in both cases. Whichever you intended, I hope the differences are illuminating. I will ...
3 votes

Can Latin "inde" introduce a temporal clause?

What your question really seems to be about is whether inde can serve as a subordinate conjunction, like dum, cum, etc., introducing a subordinate clause, to be translated as "when" or "while". You ...
  • 19.1k
3 votes

A type of subordinating construction governing the dative?

In addition to Cerberus' answer, I would rather make the following slicing: fas [est] nulli casto insistere limen sceleratum As far as I know, it is very common to omit esse in Latin: e.g. some ...
  • 2,242
2 votes

Is active periphrastic conjugation compulsory in consecutio temporum?

Just came across this, sorry to see no answers. From my reading only the indirect question takes a periphrastic future in the subordinate,. Fear, Purpose and Final classes mostly take incomplete ...
2 votes

Consecutio temporum et praesens historicum

Tuomo Pekkanen's Ars Grammatica – Latinan kielioppi (§116, lisäys 3) mentions that the historical present can be treated as either a present tense or as a past tense when consecutio ...
2 votes

What is the difference between cum, quia and quod in a causal clause?

The best answer that I can give is to adapt the notes I made years ago during instruction in prose composition [which I am doing by inserting comments in square brackets]. ADVERBIAL CLAUSES — CAUSAL ...
  • 17.7k
2 votes

Is ūnō a relative pronoun in this sentence?

I suspect one of the things that's throwing you off is the word order: it would have been much easier if the sentence had been uxor quae bona est contenta est ūnō uirō. However, that order feels ...
2 votes
Accepted

How to choose tense of conjunctive in a clause subordinate to an accusativus cum infinitivo structure?

When a clause is subordinate to a nominal form of a verb (anything that does not have a grammatical person), the conjunctive predicate of the subordinate clause follows the predicate verb of its main ...
2 votes
Accepted

Why the Perfect Subjunctive?

Tense The perfect conjunctive (= subjunctive) of reverti would be reversi sint, not reversi fuerint. The perfect forms of deponent verbs are typically formed with present and imperfect forms of esse, ...
2 votes

On the syntax of 'Cogitate quantis laboribus fundatum imperium (...) una nox paene delerit' (Cic. Cat. 4, 19)

There is little to add to the wonderful answer by @Cerberus, but I though it might be useful to add another possible way of translating this sentence into English by rendering the occurrences of ...
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1 vote

Oblique cases and 'si quis'

I found this statement in an Oxford Latin Syntax Volume I, 11.137 "the anaphoric pronoun is": For the anaphoric pronoun a distinction must be made between the oblique forms and the ...
  • 1,401

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