49 votes
Accepted

Why is "ille" used in Winnie ille Pu and Hobbitus Ille?

It's true that in Classical Latin, ille is a demonstrative pronoun (corresponding to that), not an article; indeed, articles as we know them in English do not exist in Classical Latin. However, that'...
user avatar
15 votes
Accepted

Why was ante tribus translated as "fifteen years ago"?

Lustrum has several meanings, but that which applies here is the period of five years which elapsed from census to census. The phrase is actually lustris ante tribus, or 'three lustra ago'. A good ...
user avatar
  • 17.5k
13 votes
Accepted

Ave Verum Corpus: why ablative?

The subject is latus. Definition 6 in OLD is most relevant here: 6 (of solid objects, usu. w. abl.) To be bathed or soaked (in a fluid specified or implied), run, stream, overflow, etc.) For ...
user avatar
  • 17.6k
12 votes
Accepted

'idem hercle esset' meaning?

"By Hercules!" "Indeed!" - Common in classical and post-classical Latin. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/hopper/text?doc=Perseus%3Atext%3A1999.04.0059%3Aentry%3DHercules
user avatar
  • 15.7k
12 votes
Accepted

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

You are confusing two words: The noun medium means "center". The adjective medius means "central". In this idiom one goes into "central things". The word res is feminine (the singular nominative and ...
user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

Why is "Onus" in the Dative Case?

The oneri is a dative of purpose or dativus finalis. A simple example of such a dative is id mihi usui est, "it is of use to me". There are often two datives: the beneficiary and the ...
user avatar
12 votes
Accepted

How should "Haec Fracastorius." be translated?

Haec is neuter plural, and there is an implied dicit: Haec dicit Fracastorius, "F. says these things". I don't read "So much for Fracastoro" as necessarily dismissive: it's just a ...
user avatar
  • 27.9k
11 votes
Accepted

Ars gratia artis

"Art for the Sake of Art" This phrase, quite conveniently, uses the same word order in both English and Latin. Ars, artis (artium) is a third-declension feminine noun. It can mean "art&...
user avatar
  • 50.6k
11 votes
Accepted

How do you parse "futurum est" in Matthew 2:13?

Futurum est is a future active periphrastic form. It is built from futurum, the future active participle of sum (here in the neuter), which by itself means "going to be, about to be". With the ...
user avatar
  • 27.9k
11 votes
Accepted

"Esto mihi in rupem praesidii et in domum munitam..."

This is most certainly a Hebraism. Compare to 2 Sam 7:14: ego ero ei in patrem et ipse erit mihi in filium In the Hebrew, we have: אֲנִי֙ אֶהְיֶה־לּ֣וֹ לְאָ֔ב וְה֖וּא יִהְיֶה־לִּ֣י לְבֵ֑ן ...
user avatar
  • 36.5k
11 votes
Accepted

How to translate these few lines? Met. 1.94–96

Let me offer a translation attempt piece by piece. My translations are not perfectly literal, but the way I build it up should clarify what it each Latin word does. I reordered the words to make the ...
user avatar
11 votes
Accepted

How to say "I am falling in love with this language"?

Latin has an inchoative suffix -sc- which indicates that a certain state is beginning, and which is quite productive (rubesco, senesco, reconvalesco, ...). And indeed, there is the verb amasco – "...
user avatar
  • 2,781
11 votes

How to say "I am falling in love with this language"?

Oxford [English-to-Latin section (under "fall")], offers "adamo" = "to fall in love with", taking the accusative case. (In the Latin-to-English the definition of "...
user avatar
  • 6,940
11 votes

"Audi nos" translation problem

Nos can be either "we" or "us." The nominative and accusative for it are the same. It's not that different from the English "you", which can be the subject (vos auditis, &...
user avatar
  • 38.9k
10 votes
Accepted

Translation: «impulsi sunt et ipsi Christi amore»

This is the big question! Genitives can be either subjective or objective, and sometimes it's impossible to know which one a genitive is. Subjective genitives are the subject of the genitive. If this ...
user avatar
  • 38.9k
10 votes
Accepted

Is the Spanish translation of the "Exultet" chant literal?

You are correct to say that this is not a 'literal' translation. Turba is a feminine singular noun, and exultet is rightly singular. I'm not sure coro is the right word, though. Interestingly, turba ...
user avatar
  • 38.9k
10 votes

Is Thomas Hobbes' translation of "nosce te ipsum" as "read thyself" valid?

As @Cerberus says, it's an unusual but valid translation. I think, however, it becomes clearer when one adds the beginning of the paragraph, so that it reads: There is a saying much usurped of ...
user avatar
  • 15.9k
10 votes
Accepted

Help me understand this Latin "Dad Joke"

In a footnote to his 1891 translation of the relevant sentence (page 294), J. S. Watson says this: 2 Video me a te circumveniri. Toup, in his Appendix to Theocritus, suggests that we should read ...
user avatar
  • 17.6k
9 votes
Accepted

"Stantes erant pedes nostri..."

Forgive me if I'm missing something, but: I think your issue here may be with the English rather than the Latin. To say that something "was wont to do" something ("wont" with an o and no apostrophe ...
user avatar
  • 15.9k
9 votes
Accepted

Dominus illuminatio mea

The verb est is omitted but implied. The motto is taken from the start of Psalm 27 (or 26): Dominus illuminatio mea et salus mea; quem timebo? Dominus protector vitae meae; a quo trepidabo? The Lord ...
user avatar
  • 14.4k
9 votes
Accepted

What would "agenda" be in Ancient Greek?

The closest Greek equivalent to a Latin gerundive is one of the verbal adjectives ending in -τέος (formed on the aorist passive stem). Both ποιέω and πράττω – unlike ἄγω, as you note – are generally ...
user avatar
  • 17.6k
9 votes

Why is "sic semper erat, et sic semper erit" translated this way?

Translation generally isn't a one-to-one mapping between Latin words and English words. While sīc is often glossed as "thus", you might also translate it as "like this", or "...
user avatar
  • 50.6k
9 votes
Accepted

Unsure why the accusative relative pronoun is used? [Tacitus Annals 2.24]

I think corpora equorum must be the subject of the clause, with quos its object, and the verb tolerare being used with the following sense per Lewis and Short: Transf., to support a person or thing, ...
user avatar
  • 20.9k
8 votes
Accepted

How does "recte admones" mean "you do well to remind me"?

Recte far more often means "rightly." As Lewis & Short puts it: Trop., rightly, correctly, properly, duly, suitably, well, advantageously, accurately (very freq. in all periods and styles): ...
user avatar
  • 38.9k
8 votes
Accepted

'Unde' and 'fit ut' meaning in this context

A very literal translation: Whence it comes that the beginning which they see natural things possess, they attach to substances. A more natural translation: This is why they ascribe to ...
user avatar
  • 27.9k
8 votes

Why *In medias res* and not *In media res*?

Medias is not a noun but an accusative of the adjective medius (middle or central) in agreement with the plural res. This is standard idiomatic usage, not just for this phrase. A spatial portion is ...
user avatar
  • 181
8 votes
Accepted

Fore or not Fore?

You need the subordinate idea ('to resist to the death') to be cast into the future (because the confederates didn't bind themselves to have resisted earlier or to be resisting right now). Normally, ...
user avatar
  • 17.6k
8 votes
Accepted

What are the meaning of these sentences? Christiani victores obsessi

Here's a literal translation of the four chapter titles: Christiani victores obsessi The Christian victors [are] besieged N.B. "obsessi" is the past participle of obsideo. Enumeratio ...
user avatar
  • 36.5k
8 votes
Accepted

Why is Certainty to be Expressed by the Present Subjunctive?

It is an indirect question. The question words are quantae and quam. The direct version would be: How great are the forces of the enemy, and how impregnable is their position? Quantae sunt hostium ...
user avatar
8 votes

How to say "I am falling in love with this language"?

Although the inchoative suffix -sc- is productive, I would advise against using it in everyday speech unless the verb is already a common one. I could say "pugnasco" (unattested) or "...
user avatar
  • 36.5k

Only top scored, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible