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17 votes
Accepted

Why "impressa" in Æneid IV.659–60?

Virgil is imitating a Greek construction here, or rather two Greek constructions: the middle voice and the accusative of respect. Greek had a "middle" voice, which in most tenses was formally ...
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15 votes

Translating "Nocte volat caelī mediō"

As an adjective, indeed, medius, -a, -um does not take a genitive. However, there is a noun, the substantive medium, -i, which also means "middle" or "midst." Referring to a ...
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12 votes
Accepted

Allecto's cerulean hair in *Æneid* VII.346-7

Allecto, one of the Furies, is commonly associated with dark colours and snakes (see Pauly–Wissowa on the Furies). Furies often have snake hair too, and snakes are often blue; they don't look like ...
  • 19k
11 votes

Potentially Ambiguous Subject for a Verb in the Aeneid

Grammatically, the subject must be the bough, because qui, the relative pronoun that refers to ramum, is nominative. In the clause 'which she was hiding', 'which' is the direct object; so the ...
  • 18k
10 votes
Accepted

Length of i in Vergilius' "ferentis"

ACC.PL. is fĕrĕntīs. The final syllable is superheavy, i.e. it consists of three morae. FYI, the latest Teubner edition of Aeneis (Conte 2009) uses "ferentis", and so does Mynors 1969: aut ...
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10 votes
Accepted

What is the etymology and origin of the name of Dido's sister Anna?

The entry for Anna in Wiktionary certainly states that it derives from the Hebrew Hannah. And this is how Augustine uses it in The City of God against the Pagans, in book 17, when referring to Hannah,...
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10 votes
Accepted

Extra initial Aeneid lines in 1662 M. de Marolles version

Fascinating question! I've found some editions of the Aeneid with these extra lines included, and some (most) without. It seems that they aren't found in any of the oldest manuscripts of the Aeneid (...
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9 votes

Negative Future Imperatives

Negative future imperatives do indeed exist. A great many can be found in the laws of twelve tables. Example: Hominem mortuum in urbe ne sepelito Do not bury a dead person in the city Judging ...
9 votes

Potentially Ambiguous Subject for a Verb in the Aeneid

English is unhelpful here, as "hide" can be transitive or intransitive. However, the verb lateo, latere is intransitive. It doesn't mean to hide something, but rather to lie hidden or to be hidden. It'...
  • 41.7k
8 votes

Length of i in Vergilius' "ferentis"

It's definitely long, because the vowel of that i-stem acc. pl. ending, -īs, is always long, as any good grammar will tell you. (If the form was gen. sg., of course, it would be short, but that doesn'...
  • 28.7k
8 votes
Accepted

Can a supine verb have arguments?

Looking at it, I don't think me is ablative; it's more likely an accusative as the subject of an indirect statement with credere. Discessu here is not a supine, but a fourth-declension noun, discessus....
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7 votes

Translation of Lines 333–336 of Vergil's Aeneid Book 4

Your second translation is pretty close to the mark. Let's go through the translation step by step. Let us first recall to mind the context: Dido has just finished a long harangue (4:305-330) ...
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7 votes
Accepted

A type of subordinating construction governing the dative?

Yes, I would by all means supply est. The phrase fas est is a fixed combination either introducing an a.c.i. or governing a complementary/supplementary infinitive plus the latter's arguments. The est ...
  • 19k
7 votes

Is this translation for “If I cannot move Heaven, I will raise Hell.” correct?

The last word is wrong, it should be movebo. Then it is an exact quote from Vergil's epic Aeneid (liber VII, 312), one of the most famous works in the Latin language, and in world literature. It does ...
6 votes

What is the etymology and origin of the name of Dido's sister Anna?

Just to come back to part of the original question, Virgil did not come up with this part of the story himself. Anna as sister of Dido already occurs in Naevius and Varro; this does of course not ...
6 votes
Accepted

Why is Virgil's Aeneid considered incomplete?

I compiled this list of mistakes with the help of the commentary accompanying the Finnish translation by Alpo Rönty. I do not claim that the list is complete, but I hope it gives something ...
6 votes
Accepted

Fifth spondee in Aeneis I.690

The name Ĭūlus is trisyllabic. It's listed as such in dictionaries, e.g. L&S, and there's ample metrical evidence for this, though much of it is indirect. A search for forms of Iūlus in the ...
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6 votes

Can a supine verb have arguments?

The second supine (ending with -u) can only be combined with adjectives, or with fas and nefas. Examples: iucundum cognitu atque auditu nefas est dictu A second supine verb never has an object, but ...
  • 521
5 votes
Accepted

Can Latin "inde" introduce a temporal clause?

Regarding the question in the title, Lewis and Short (seemingly this community's favorite dictionary) lists among the meanings of inde the following: from that time, thenceforward, since, after that, ...
  • 10.6k
5 votes

What is the etymology and origin of the name of Dido's sister Anna?

Penelope's survey of available evidence seems to be virtually complete. I chiefly want to observe — with no detriment at all to Penelope's answer — that it relies wholly on mythology, which is really ...
  • 17.6k
5 votes

Translation of Lines 333–336 of Vergil's Aeneid Book 4

You might enjoy Dryden's famous — but magnificently erratic — translation, completed in 1697 : . . . and thus at length replies, / "Fair Queen, you never can enough repeat / Your boundless favours, ...
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5 votes
Accepted

Does "Iulus" predate Vergil?

Here is the article Iulus in "The New Pauli": In the tradition set by Virgil I. is the only son of Aeneas and Creusa of Troy, progenitor of the Roman gens Iulia; in Troy he is called Ilus, ...
  • 16k
5 votes
Accepted

How does one know when adjectives and participles are used dominantly?

I'm afraid I don't have good news for you. In Latin one can only use meaning & context to know if the adjective/participle is used "dominantly" (NB: for a relevant terminological remark, please ...
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5 votes

How does one know when adjectives and participles are used dominantly?

In addition to Mitomino's excellent answer, I would just like to note that partitive use of adjectives exists in English too and is no less ambiguous than in Latin. OK, we do not say “the top ...
4 votes

Structure of the Aeneid

Looking at Niklas Holzbergs list of publications seems unproductive for this. His Sammlung Tusculum book does not look like what you want. This seems to be a mixup: Nicholas Horsfall has published on ...
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4 votes

Why is Virgil's Aeneid considered incomplete?

By chance I came across this passage on teaching Virgil, and other Classics in p. 32 [on-line 47/171]The Seven Liberal Arts, Paul Abelson, 1909. Bernard of Chartres, for instance, who taught John ...
  • 8,475
4 votes

Why is Virgil's Aeneid considered incomplete?

There is much evidence on the composition of the Aeneid to support the tradition that it was left incomplete and unedited at the poet’s death and, further, that his will required it to be destroyed ...
  • 17.6k
4 votes

Length of i in Vergilius' "ferentis"

This is so old a question, and this well-known line has so often been critically examined, that a definitive reply about the spelling appears out of the question. Wherever you consult a copy of the ...
  • 17.6k
4 votes
Accepted

Does the avenger arise from bones or ashes?

Perseus offers two English translations of Aeneid, including your passage. Theodore C. Williams, 1910, writes: Arise, Out of my dust, unknown Avenger, rise! John Dryden writes: Rise some ...
3 votes

A type of subordinating construction governing the dative?

In addition to Cerberus' answer, I would rather make the following slicing: fas [est] nulli casto insistere limen sceleratum As far as I know, it is very common to omit esse in Latin: e.g. some ...
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