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The transaction's essential things Essentiālia negōtiī transactions' essential things Essentiālia negōtiōrum essential things of the transaction Essentiālia negōtiī essential things of the transactions Essentiālia negōtiōrum negōtia essentiālia trānsāctiōnis "Essential affairs of the transaction" negōtia essentiālia trānsāctiōnum "...


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EDIT: Note that this answer applies to an earlier version of the question; see the revision history for details. The genitive in (Classical) Latin is, in fact, never accompanied by an article—because Latin has no articles at all! Like in (Ancient) Greek, the Latin genitive is marked by a special ending on nouns and adjectives. This ending varies by ...


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The prosaic word order in Latin—that is, the ordinary, normal, unremarkable word order—goes like this:       noun modifier The noun comes first, and the modifier comes right after. The modifier can be any of: an adjective, as in canis ruber (a red dog); a noun in the genitive case, as in canis Georgii (George's dog); (rarely) a noun in the same case, as ...


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To answer the question from the title, after is somewhat more common than before, but both are perfectly acceptable. Most authors choose the order based on what sounds better, or what they want to emphasize. (Putting the adjective first puts more emphasis on it.) To answer the question from the body, though: syntactically, there are no adjectives in this ...


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My first response would be "yes, the gender is the same as in Greek", but that rule definitely has exceptions. I wouldn't say that the general topic is very simple: I think that although there is a straightforward equivalence for many words, the words that show change or variation in gender are somewhat complicated to explain. One exception that I know of ...


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Other muscles with several enumerated parts seem to use primus, secundus, tertius, ..., this is, the masculine nominative of ordinal numbers (masculine because musculus is masculine). This is consistent with the answers in your other question. Examples of such use are: extensor pollicis adductor trochanter: peronaeus (the latter two taken from here) ...


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Where is the correct position for the Latin words for left and right for a muscle or bone name and is there a general rule where to position this word? In modern (English) usage, the Latin for left and right is not commonly used. Nevertheless, I think we can deduce a general rule by (1) looking at early anatomy books and (2) extrapolating from the use of ...


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It seems usage of Latin name for muscles many times does not specify the side of the body in Latin. Instead, they use English (or other languages), e.g. "left/right latissimus dorsi" (e.g. left here). However, the Latin for right and left are still used in some cases. Most of the cases I could find (without attempting to provide an exhaustive statistical ...


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