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You could use lectualis or lectuarius, "of or belonging to the bed". Lewis & Short: lectŭālis, e, adj. [2. lectus], of or belonging to the bed: "morbus", which confines one to his bed, Spart. Hadr. 23 dub. (al. letalis). lectŭārĭus, a, um, adj. [id.], of or belonging to the bed, bed- (late Lat.): "lectuaria (lecticaria) sindon&...


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If you want something more literally similar to English, here is a suggestion. I want to get an adjective derived from "couch" and a noun for "surfer", as I find that to be the best Latin equivalent of English noun adjuncts. A couple of words for a couch come to mind after consulting dictionaries: lectus, lectulus, torus, stibadium, ...


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In this case, and in many other cases, the details of obstare are given in a subordinate clause. That subordinate clause, introduced here by quominus, has bellum as its subject. But the grammatical role of bellum could be anything, depending on how the subordinate clause is put together, and this has nothing to do with obstare. Bellum is not an object of ...


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I am a nonbinary latin student and I do sometimes use masculine, but mainly neuter terms. I realize it is not typically used for humans, but language is made to be adjusted to the people's needs. I think it depends on the individual, but I think most of us use neuter. It doesn't matter if you think it's dehumanizing as long as the nonbinary person is okay ...


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As Allen & Greenough (§499) points out, one nuance that this participle can express is 'likelihood or 'certaintly.' Sometimes, this certainty is so strong, that it even seems to approach inevitability or 'destiny.' One example that comes immediately to mind is letter 6.16.2 of Pliny, the first of two letters to Tacitus about the eruption of Vesuvius: ...


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In A Grammar of the Latin Language, Karl Gottlob Zumpt says, But by the combination of the participle future active with the tenses of esse a really new conjugation is formed denoting an intention to do something. This intention may arise either from the person's own will , or from outward circumstances, so that, e. g., scripturus sum may either mean “I ...


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The periphrastic future tenses are often used to convey the subject’s intention at the time of the auxiliary verb. venturus sum = I intend to come venturus eram = I was intending to come But you are right in that is can also be used as equivalent to simple future.


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