New answers tagged

5

There are a few Latin verbs ending in -izare, and they are almost all Greek loanwords. (This list was generated by using the search for “words ending with …” on the Perseus server—do note that it contains a few false positives, some of the entries are no verbs at all.) And this is not surprising, as -ῐ́ζω is a common suffix in Greek used for forming verbs ...


2

I don't have a source other than Lewis & Short, but possibly the classical convallis or vallis could be put to use.


3

Latin speaker here. This is a great question, and I am asked this question all the time. I taught myself to speak Latin while I was in middle and high school (mainly eighth through eleventh grades). My main reason for doing so was that I enjoyed Latin as a written language so much (our classes were mainly reading and translating, with some reading out ...


4

The most suitable words seem to be negotium, opera (feminine), opus (neuter, plural opera), and labor. All are classical words that can be used for that purpose, but work in the sense you describe appears not to have been a set concept in the ancient world. Different situations might call for different words, but the best general match in the setting you ...


1

Several reasons: As a lingua franca. Since it's not spoken by anybody, it has no specific allegiance (except maybe to the Christianity, but that's universal enough as to be a non-issue). As a result, you can use it without offending anybody. For long-term archival. Since it's generally only used in writing, it has not really evolved; you don't have "do" and ...


1

Aside from Latin as a language to speak, Latin word-formation is used in medical sciences, and for example many drugs are given official names in English, French, Spanish, and Latin, and the Latin word is used in several languages as the official name in that language.


3

It is a 'dead' language. That might sound negative but it conveys a very important benefit which is that it nolonger changes in the way that current living languages do. So if you read or write something today it will have the same meaning when the next generation come to read it unlike something written in a 'living' language like English which mutates ...


2

Latin and chess are amongst the finest trainings, for the mind, I have come across. Both of these compel the student to think, think & think again--still, the answer may be wrong! The frustration; the fury; the expletives; the delight, when, occasionally, the answer is correct. There are, of course, other intellectual challenges: Times Crossword (...


6

Why would anyone speak Latin in 2020? Because at least there are parts of it we all readily understand & it gets the idea across succinctly. Take this comment ... we constantly optimize our way of communicating, EG: "Do not" -> "Don't", "Thomas A Swift's Electronic Rifle" -> TASER ... The "EG" is Latin exemplī grātiā, less verbose than “for the ...


8

The Corpus Iuris Civilis is in Latin. To the extent that Roman civil law applies or has been adapted in a given country, it's useful to have recourse to specific Latin phrases that may not have precise equivalents in modern languages. The same can be said of both Latin and ancient Greek when it comes to, say, philosophical and theological discourse, or the ...


15

Expanding on brianpck's comment above, as a 'dead' language anything you read or write in Latin now will likely be just as readable in another 1000 years. Something written in English, French, German, or any other language, will probably not be as easily read after that much time. Latin incorporates some new words, but the basic language and its utility ...


42

The actual set of reasons varies from person to person, but here are some: It's a hobby. Why do people still shoot arrows with bows? Surely it's not a very efficient way to attack prey or anything else. Some people like archery, and few of them can or feel a need to point to a specific benefit gained from it. Similarly, some people like Latin. This might ...


Top 50 recent answers are included