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5

The selenographical names can perhaps be viewed as appositions and would as such not be ungrammatical (Latin appositions may be incongruent in number or gender, like urbs Athenae). In that case both parts would have to be declined in parallel, e.g. Videsne Montes Agricolam? In my opinion one should take this as scientific terminology based on Latin, not ...


4

I think I may have an answer to my own question. Adams in "Social Variation and the Latin Language" says that there were two independent developments - 'au' was pronounced 'o' in certain rustic Latin words during the Classical period but in general 'au' remained the pronunciation, then there was a later development where words from Latin containing 'au' ...


1

I would analyse non obstante eo quod as “in spite of the fact that …, the fact that … notwithstanding” etc. (literally: “with it not hindering that …,” i.e., it is an ablativus absolutus). And why the subjunctive? I would say it is another case of the dreaded quod cum coniunctivo. I think you got the first part right but started stumbling at siue denique, ...


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