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1

In addition to the existing answers, I think it is worth adding that the term mora was used by Johannes Kepler in the early 17th century to denote basically the duration or time. William H. Donahue, who translated his great work Astronomia Nova, found it noteworthy to add entry on the term mora in the glossary; there he writes Mora is "literally delay&...


4

I will remark on the OP's entire comment: Would you accept a translation such as : " duration is the lasting or permanence of things in being/ essence "? . I cannot find any other equivalent, but this sounds a bit like a tautology. dūrātiō appears to be completely unattested before the 14th century, and is strictly a piece of late medieval ...


2

The Eustache de Saint-Paul expression I would translate as DURATION, that can mean the permanence or span of time for that a thing exists. This sounds tautological, but since you are translating a lexicon entry, you should keep in mind that the text is meant for a reader who does not know what "DURATIO" means, or is in search of a better ...


7

The meaning "duration" or "space of time" was already there in Classical Latin: see Lewis and Short, section IIB.


4

Mittimus Vobis, writes [rector] B., hominem crassioris pituitæ, hebetioris ingenii et fallacis nimium labilisqve memoriæ, sed cetera non improbum, non perversum, non malitiosum This is translated as: We send to You a man of rather thick phlegm, dull mental faculties, and a memory far too faulty and slipping, but otherwise not wicked, not perverse, not ...


4

As pointed out by Cairnarvon (see his/her comment above and the useful link), this seems to be a Greek accusative, which is also referred to as "accusative of respect" (see cmw's comment below and related questions: question1 and question2). The following relevant information/confirmation can be found here: "Ennius in his Annals ventured on ...


10

Gildersleeve & Lodge, Latin grammar, section 254.2 (in the discussion of the indicative mood) states: The Impf. as the Tense of Disappointment is sometimes used in these verbs [= verbs that denote possibility and power, obligation and necessity, and also other expressions of the same, such as the passive periphrastic] to denote opposition to a present ...


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