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3

Here's some context: Seemingly nothing much had been done in the matter of Daffodil. And the Chief Constable, who had hard-worked officers to protect, was pretty stiff with Caroline. Not at first: I gather he tried heading her off by explaining some of the jobs he had on hand, and letting her in on a harmless wartime secret or two. But Caroline, who is ...


1

Asphodelus -i (m) appears to be a kind of lily that the Greeks closely associated with death. Specifically, in Greek and English literary use, it references the Elysian meadows (the good place where fallen Heroes go). I'm not an expert on this subject-- this is where I got the information: https://www.etymonline.com/word/asphodel. It appears to be ...


5

In addition to Mitomino's excellent answer, I would just like to note that partitive use of adjectives exists in English too and is no less ambiguous than in Latin. OK, we do not say “the top mountain” in English. But we do say: the southern United States (really: the southern part) the late twentieth century (really: the late part) the lowest ebb (really: ...


2

As pointed out by Joonas, it is VERY important to give the relevant/full quotes (at least, in these cases). Otherwise, the poster can receive contradictory feedback. For example, Joonas answered as Cicero would probably did. Indeed, in Classical Latin the only interpretation/analysis of the first example is the one given by Joonas. However, it is the case ...


5

I'm afraid I don't have good news for you. In Latin one can only use meaning & context to know if the adjective/participle is used "dominantly" (NB: for a relevant terminological remark, please see TKR's comment above). Note that your first example is ambiguous between a predicative/"dominant" reading ('the highest point of heaven') and an attributive ...


3

The verb veniunt doesn't work as directly with the gerundive (future passive participle) as you think. Omnia consideranda is "everything that must be considered", so it should be more along the lines of: [These] come before everything that must be considered. You can argue that the meaning is practically the same, but I think there is a meaningful ...


5

The missing neutral noun is praestari. Infinitives can act as nouns. They are neutral and undeclinable. They are often objects but can also be subjects: Errare humanum est. To err is human. When they are the subject, they rarely have a subject. But it is possible, and in that case, their subject is in the accusative. Te venire pergratum est. Your ...


4

"Possibile & aequissimum erat" is an impersonal sentence, which can be translated in English as "it was possible and most fair", but which needs no such pronoun in Latin. What was 'possible and most fair' is here expressed as an accusative-infinitive, with quam (indeed referring back to legem) and praestari. So "... legem posuit, quam praestari ... ...


6

Like fdb said, it should be 'profitentes' instead of 'profites'. Nicolaus Cusanus cited Ketton's translation like this: "Profitentes etiam se suae caedis authores cordibus suis non minimam ambiguitatem inde gerunt, [sed eum nullatenus interfecerunt]" (https://books.google.nl/books?id=mQ-KDwAAQBAJ&pg=PA46). Translation by Hagemann and Glei: "Selbst wenn ...


4

Presumably you have looked at this: وَقَوۡلِهِمۡ إِنَّا قَتَلۡنَا ٱلۡمَسِيحَ عِيسَى ٱبۡنَ مَرۡيَمَ رَسُولَ ٱللَّهِ وَمَا قَتَلُوهُ وَمَا صَلَبُوهُ وَلَـٰكِن شُبِّهَ لَهُمۡ‌ۚ وَإِنَّ ٱلَّذِينَ ٱخۡتَلَفُواْ فِيهِ لَفِى شَكٍّ۬ مِّنۡهُ‌ۚ مَا لَهُم بِهِۦ مِنۡ عِلۡمٍ إِلَّا ٱتِّبَاعَ ٱلظَّنِّ‌ۚ وَمَا قَتَلُوهُ يَقِينَۢا “profites” does not make any sense to me. ...


2

With gerunds & gerundives "ad + accusative" = "for the purpose of": the gerund: "paratus ad regendum" = "prepared for the purpose of ruling"; the gerundive: "nos ipsos paremus ad domum aedificandam." = "let us prepare ourselves for the purpose of building the house." Here: "quae ad fidem concipiendam et conservandam necessaria est, facere." = "...


3

Paratus fuit means the same thing as paratus erat, it's a pluperfect passive (God had been prepared). And yes, most first year textbooks I've seen prefer erat over fuit in this case, but fuit is far from uncommon. Concipendam and conservandam are gerundives which modify gratiam. But since they are gerundives, they are not just adjectives, they still have a ...


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