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How to parse "in eo quod"?

How to parse "in eo quod"? It appears that in eo quod is not a syntagma, but rather that the preposition in goes with manent to form a different syntagma. The syntagma maneō in quōd is ...
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5 votes

How to parse "in eo quod"?

quod facta sunt, in eō manent = what they [= entities] have been made (as/into), they remain in that state/as that thing. The singular is needed because quae facta sunt (as in the first clause) means ‘...
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How to parse "in eo quod"?

Here is the translation offered by the Works of Saint Augustine: Because when the things that have been made remain as what they were made, to the extent they received it, like those things that have ...
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6 votes

Help with two very simple but opaque gobbets of neo-Latin

For your first question: You understand the syntax correctly. habitus ac positiō is the 2-for-1 translation equivalent of the single Aristotelian ἕξις héxis. A lucid explanation for why this is ...
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Help with two very simple but opaque gobbets of neo-Latin

Given the context, I'd take the second passage to mean: "that which is to be done shortly/soon/next, should be considered as having been already done". The thrust of the paragraph is ...
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3 votes

Is "Apex Saecula" a correct translation for "The pinnacle of the ages/centuries"?

Summum, a synonym of apex and the root of English "summit" and French "sommet", might be a better translation from a purist standpoint, since I think summum is more often used in ...
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Is "Apex Saecula" a correct translation for "The pinnacle of the ages/centuries"?

You need the plural genitive of saeculum (an age, a century), which is saeculorum, "of the ages". I think apex saeculorum is fine. Most educated people from European countries will instantly ...
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