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10

This is all about how thousands work in Latin. The singular mille is an undeclinable adjective, the plural milia is a third declension noun. When you are counting the youth, with mille the young are in whatever case you need and with milia it is milia that is in the correct grammatical case and the young are in the genitive. In the singular the number is the ...


9

You can translate this word by word: Non - No minus - less stultum - stupid quam - than impium - wicked So it means: "No less stupid than wicked." Who ever said Latin was difficult?


5

Another howler (to go with the carrots perhaps): Sacrificium laudis → Ham Credit where it is due, this one was discovered and pointed out on Twitter by John Byron Kuhner. As of this writing, it can still be reproduced. What it really means is "sacrifice of praise," and it comes from Psalm 49:14 (Psalm 50 in English bibles). I have no idea how ...


3

When I said that mihi placet can't be used like that, I didn't mean to say it can't stand alone - it absolutely can when the context is sufficient to identify the thing that evokes the emotion. Even English allows some ellipsis colloquially, eg. "(d')you like?". I meant only that it can't be used as a greeting in the same way "I like" can'...


9

Per tweet, it seems (and verified) Google Translate renders Latine as English. https://translate.google.com/?sl=la&tl=en&text=Ego%20Latine%20loquor%20&op=translate


2

I see my issue now. My translation was The Lord has handed over to you the souls of the redeemed, to be placed in supernal happiness But the comma should not be there. It gives the impression (to me at least) that Michael is the one who is to place the souls (quasi "animas redemptórum, ut locentur ..."). Without the comma, it is clearer (again, ...


9

As Draconis and I mentioned in the comments, your translation is fine. If I might break it down: tibi trádidit Dóminus ánimas redemptórum in supérna felicitáte locándas The subject is dominus in the nominative. The main verb is tradidit, in the perfect tense, and its direct and indirect object are animas and tibi respectively. The basic sentence is &...


6

Oh wow, it's almost like this question was made just for me. I was writing a Latin crossword exercise, where the clues and answers were both in Latin. I wrote the clue "Semper dicebat Carthaginem esse delendam" ("He was always saying Carthage must be destroyed", the answer being "Cato Maior"). I decided to put this clue into GT ...


7

So I'm just gonna go ahead and post the answer that started it. While translating "sheperd" via Google translate yields "pastor" as expected, translating "goatherd" does not yield the expected "pastor" but rather "unus caprimulgus" which back-translates as one of a kind of bird named for its myth of drinking ...


10

Audiatur et altera pars is translated "let the other party", reminiscent of "let them eat cake". This is also verified by Google Translate contributors. Isn't there some Latin.SE API so Google Translate can tap into the knowledge here? Edit: per user2357112 supports Monica's comment, the phrase means "let the other side be heard as ...


16

This one was mentioned in the linked question and appears to be still valid: dolor sit amet > "carrots" This translation is marked as verified by community and no other options are given. These three Latin words are from the nonsensical lorem ipsum text often used for placeholders. The words are all valid Latin but don't make a sensible ...


4

I agree with all Hugh's comments, but there are a few other small points in your translation that could be changed a bit. Here's a full translation: Octavius Durantes, distinguished in humane and theological subjects, labored with extraordinary skill and in most beautiful [style] on volumes by which he rendered himself useful to his contemporaries and ...


5

Is it posible that Quibus are the Volumina 'by means of which (volumes)' ? and the other two would then be datives "by means of which he rendered himself useful to the present (generation) and well-known to the those about to be." Ainsworth in the classical section gives scloppus, or sclopus as 'a sound made with puffing of the cheeks' ---Nec ...


8

Quod is definitely a correct and idiomatic way to express rules that would be rendered with “that which ⋯” in English. As you have found out, machine translators for Latin are useless. But open any anthology of Latin proverbs and quotations at the letter Q, and you will find examples like: Quod nocet, docet. (That which hurts, teaches.) Quod licet Jovi, non ...


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