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Id agendum est… This is a construction called the gerundive of obligation. Literally, this means "it must be done" or "it should be done"; the "it" here is somewhat generic, and could be translated into English as "things" or "something". (Side note: the plural of agendum is agenda, which was borrowed ...


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The second motto is an embarrassing typo for a similar phrase. Ex Unitate Vires literally means, "From Unity, Strength." "Ex unitae vires" doesn't make any grammatical sense. Why someone would impress such a solecism on 1 oz of gold, without checking for typos, is beyond my ability to comprehend. "Ens causa sui" means, "A ...


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There was a reference to Rotary in one of the early episodes. Rotary International’s motto is “Service Above Self.” Possible connection?


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The slogan nihil labore difficile is grammatically correct, but ambiguous and unclear. But being ambiguous and unclear is not at all unusual for a motto. If we read labore as an instrumental ablative, the slogan means "nothing is difficult with work", as intended. I will return to this phrase in a moment. If we read labore as an ablative of respect,...


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I would take it as ablative showing cause, so that it just anticipates the causal quod that follows. Therefore, eo, quod means something like 'for this [very] reason, namely because' or simply 'because.' One classical example of this use of eo quod is found in Cicero, Philippics 13.23: '<A senatu> iudicatum hostem populi Romani Dolabellam eo quod ...


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It sounds like you're asking about these two lines in particular? Præsta, Pater piíssime, Patríque compar Unice, The words here are in a somewhat unusual order, to fit the meter and the rhyme. A more usual ordering would be something like: Pater piisime, Unice-que compar Patri, præsta… I would translate this as "o most pious Father, and o One like ...


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The description on the website you linked is mistaken. (I believe the illustration on that site is correct, but it is too small to tell for certain. The illustration used by Wikipedia is big enough but is also incorrect.) The coat of arms of the University of Nottingham really says: QUÆRENTI OSTIUM … which means: an entrance for the seeker [of knowledge, ...


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